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Publication numberUS2607344 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 19, 1952
Filing dateAug 1, 1951
Priority dateAug 1, 1951
Publication numberUS 2607344 A, US 2607344A, US-A-2607344, US2607344 A, US2607344A
InventorsBrown Frank E
Original AssigneeFrederick M Turnbull
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Syringe assembly
US 2607344 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 19, 1952 F. E. BROWN SYRINGE ASSEMBLY mqdAug. 1. 1951 iff BY Emili/amd Km Patented ug. 19, 1952` OFFICE SYRINGE ASSEMBLY Frank E. Brown, Burbank, Calif., assigner to Frederick M. Turnbull, Los Angeles, Calif.

Application August 1, 1951, Serial No. 239,782 6 Claims. VA(Cl. 12S- 218) This invention relates to a structurally and' functionally improved hypodermic syringe assembly. Y

'It is an object of the invention to provide a structure of this nature in which, without difliculty, air may beV vented from a syringe barrel as an ampule is fully projected into that barrel.

A further object is that of providing a structure by means of which this result may be accomplished and which structure may readily be furnished in an economical manner under quantity production procedure.

With these and other objects in mind reference ishad to the attached sheet of drawings illustrating-one practical embodiment of the invention and in which:

'Figl 1 is a sectional side'view of an assembly in its initial position;

Fig. 2 is a similar view of that assembly showing the parts in their nal position; and

Fig. 3 is a transverse sectional view in enlarged scale taken along the lines 3--3 and in the direction of the arrows as indicated in Fig. 2.

In these views the numeral 5 indicates the barrel of a syringe which may be formed of any desired materials such as a suitable plastic. This barrel has one end closed by a wall 6 from which a nose piece 1 may extend. A needle 8 which is double pointed is mounted by Wall 5 and nose piece l. Its inner end 9 extends within the 'bore of barrel 5. 'I'he opposite end of the barrel is open and may mount outwardly extending flanges I suitable for engagement with the fingers of the operator.

An ampule for use with this barrel maybe formed of a piece of glass tubing II. One end of this tube is closed by a piston type stopper I2. The opposite end may be closed by a pierceable stopper I3. Intermediate its ends ampule I I mounts a stopper I4. Thus its body is divided Into compartments, the rear one of which mayv receive a diluent of iiuid I and the front one of which may receive medicament as indicated at I6. A by-pass in the nature of a groove Il may be provided at a point beyond the initial position of stopper I4. 'Ihe length of this bypass is greater than the width of that stopper. All three stoppers of the assembly are conveniently formed of rubber or similar material.

As will be understood with an assembly of this nature a cap I8 may be initially mounted on nose Vpiece 'l and'enclose needle 8 to maintain the sterility of the latter. When the assembly is to be used an ampule II is introduced into the bore of the barrel as shown in Fig. 1. When needle end 9 has pierced cap I3 then stopper suitable vactuator which may comprise cap I8. In any event with lstopper I2 moved to the right as'viewed in Fig. 1, then stopper I4 will be similarly shifted to the zone of the by-pass I1.

Therefore uid Vmay ilow through that by-passY In a unit suclifas this it is desirable that anv aspirating action mayv occur. `Such action will be useful, for example, in determiningwhether the needle is lodged in a vein or not. To secure an aspirating function there is provided adjacent the inner end of the ampule II a packing or pistonwhich. slidably'contacts the inner face of the bore of vbarrel `5. Conveniently this piston mayv comprise an outwardly extending flange portion' I9 of stopper I3. It is apparent that by simply withdrawing the ampule II to a slight extent from within barrel 5 a condition of sub-atmospheric pressure will be created Within the space intervening stopper I3 and needle 9. Under these circumstances if the needle is lodged in a vein this will be evidenced by a drop or two of blood discharging from the inner end 9 of the needle. With such a construction it is. of course, apparent that as the ampule is projected within the barrel air will be vented through the bore of the needle. However, when the inner end 9 of the latter once embeds within stopper I3 then continued inward movement of the ampule will cause ra condition of pressure between the stopper and wall 6.

In order to relieve this a by-pass structure is provided in proximity to Wall 6 and the adjacent bore face of the barrel. This by-pass structure may take one of several different forms. However it is preferred that it embrace an inwardly extending rib 20. That end of the rib which extends ltoward the open end of the barrel presents an inclined edge portion. Thus asgthe ampule is projected to a point at which the inner end 9 of the needle penetrates stopper I3, the flange I9 or head of the stopper will ride onto this rib in the manner indicated in Fig. 3. This will furnish a space between the edge of the stopper head and the adjacent barrel surfaces. Through these spaces air may vent during the nal stage,

. IMS-plmjected. Such vprojection occurs by the use of a Y of projection of the ampule. Therefore a simple l tion a barrel formed with an open end, a; wall closing the opposite end of said barrel, a needle` extending through said wall intothe bore' of. said barrel, an ampule insertable through the open end of said barrel, means providing a piston carried by said ampule adjacent-its end4 open end of said barrel, a headed pierceable stopperl having its peripheral edge extending outwardly from said ampule adjacent the end of the latter and having wiping engagement with the face of the barrel bore and means forming a part of said barrel in proximity to said Wall and the adjacent bore portion to provide a passage for fluid flow past said piston as the latter is projected into the zone of said end wall.

4. A syringe assembly including in combination a barrel formed with an open end, a wall closing the opposite end of said barrel, a needle l extending through said wall into the bore of carried Vby rsaid 'ampule adjacent its end and Vsaid barrel, an ampule insertable through the open-end of said barrel, means providing a piston Y having wiping engagement with the face of the and having wiping engagement Vwith the Yface* of thepbarrel bore and means forming a part ofV said barrel in proximity to said Wallandv the. adjacent bore portion to provide a passage for' fluid `Vflow past'saidpiston as thelatter is pro.

jected into the zone of said end wall.

2. A syringe assembly including in combina-Y tion a barrel formed with an open end, 'a wall` closingrthe opposite end of said barrel, a 'needle extending through'said wall into the bore ofy said barrel, anY ampule `insertablel 4through the openr'end ofVv said barrel, means providing a piston carried by saidy ampule adjacent its end and `having wiping engagement withthe face of the barrel bore and means forming apart of said barrel i-n proximity to said wall and the adjacent bore portion to provide apassagefor fluid flow past' said piston as vthe 'latter is projected intorthe zone of said end wall; the. length of the needle portion extendingV into said bore being less than the length of. saidI passage.

3'. A syringe 'assembly including inv combination a barrel formed with an open" end, a wall closing the opposite end of said barrel, a needle extending through said wall into the bore of said barrel, an ampule insertable through the barrel bore anda' rib extending inwardly of said barrel bore in proximity to said wall, said rib engaging said piston means to provide a passage foruid past vthesameas the latter is projected Ainto the zone of ,said end wall.

5. In a syringe assembly a barrel formed with an open end, a wall closing the opposite end of said barrel, a needle extending through said wall ,into the bore of saidbarrel, and means.

forminganintegral part of said barrel and dis-V posedin. proximity to said Wall and the adja-v cent bore portion to provide a passage for fluid past aV pistongprojectible into the barrellgbore. towards said Wall. A Y l f 6. In a syringe assembly a barrel formedwith an openY end, a Wall closing the opposite end of saidflbarrel, aneedleextending through said wall into the bore of said barrel, and a rib form# ing an integral part of said barrel and extend.

ing into the bore ofthe same at a point adja-v cent said wall, said rib providing anl edgeportion to engage with Vpiston material as a piston is projected through vsaid barrel bore towards said wall.r

FRANK E. BROWN.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2788002 *Aug 22, 1955Apr 9, 1957Owens Illinois Glass CoMedicinal package
US3028052 *Jun 1, 1959Apr 3, 1962John E ArcherMold-filling device
US3091240 *Dec 29, 1958May 28, 1963Milton J CohenHypodermic syringe and ventable closure means
US3115136 *Mar 12, 1962Dec 24, 1963Sarnoff Stanley JCartridge
US3115137 *Mar 12, 1962Dec 24, 1963Sarnoff Stanley JAspiration seal
US3115875 *Nov 14, 1960Dec 31, 1963Edgar H WilburnCartridge syringes
US3187749 *Jan 4, 1962Jun 8, 1965Sarnoff Stanley JHypodermic cartridge
US3291128 *Jan 24, 1964Dec 13, 1966John G O'neilHypodermic syringe construction with sealable vent means
US3366103 *Jun 24, 1965Jan 30, 1968Becton Dickinson CoBlood collecting assembly
US3678931 *Jun 9, 1970Jul 25, 1972Milton J CohenSyringe
US3712301 *Jan 11, 1971Jan 23, 1973Survival TechnologyGun type hypodermic injector with rapid cartridge displacement within holder
US3878846 *Nov 22, 1972Apr 22, 1975Spad LabHypodermic syringe with parts disposable after use
US3896805 *Nov 2, 1973Jul 29, 1975Kendall & CoMulti-chamber syringe
US4067333 *Jul 27, 1976Jan 10, 1978Immuno Aktiengesellschaft Fur Chemisch-Medizinische ProdukteSyringe for storage and application of at least two injection media
US4192919 *Jul 18, 1977Mar 11, 1980Mpl, Inc.Blood sampling and culturing kit
US4599082 *Aug 13, 1984Jul 8, 1986Becton, Dickinson And CompanyTwo-component syringe assembly
US4685910 *Jan 21, 1986Aug 11, 1987Abbott LaboratoriesApparatus and method for delivering secondary fluids to a patient using an intravenous administration set feeding a primary fluid
US4968299 *Jun 28, 1988Nov 6, 1990Kabivitrum AbMethod and device for injection
US4994043 *Jun 15, 1988Feb 19, 1991Akzo N.V.Two compartment syringe
US5222948 *Sep 9, 1991Jun 29, 1993PathInjection port for single-use syringe
US6673035Oct 20, 2000Jan 6, 2004Antares Pharma, Inc.Medical injector and medicament loading system for use therewith
US7341575Dec 23, 2003Mar 11, 2008Antares Pharma, Inc.Medical injector and medicament loading system for use therewith
DE1491850B1 *Aug 6, 1966Jun 24, 1971Upjohn CoSpritzampulle
EP0172990A1 *Apr 16, 1985Mar 5, 1986Becton, Dickinson and CompanyTwo-component syringe assembly
EP0295337A1Jun 16, 1987Dec 21, 1988Akzo Nobel N.V.Two compartment syringe and method of manufacturing
EP0298067A1 *Jun 28, 1988Jan 4, 1989Kabi Pharmacia AbMethod and device for injection
EP1066847A1 *Jul 5, 2000Jan 10, 2001Nihon Chemical Research Co. LTD.Injection Syringe
WO1991010460A1 *Jan 18, 1991Jul 23, 1991Novo Nordisk AsA process and apparatus for mixing and injecting a medicine
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/125, 604/201
International ClassificationA61M5/24
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/2448, A61M5/3148
European ClassificationA61M5/24M