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Publication numberUS2607347 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 19, 1952
Filing dateNov 5, 1949
Priority dateNov 5, 1949
Publication numberUS 2607347 A, US 2607347A, US-A-2607347, US2607347 A, US2607347A
InventorsJoseph J Kleiner
Original AssigneeJoseph J Kleiner
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Assembly for bacteriological tests
US 2607347 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' Aug- 19, 1952 J. J. KLEINR 2,607,347

ASSEMBLY FOR BACTERIOLOICAL TESTS Filed Nov. 5, 1949 IN V EN TOR.

Jase' l Kleiner BY l 9M M uw Patented ug. 19, 1952 UNITEDv STATES PATENT OFFICE ASSEMBLY Fon AcTEmoLoercAL TESTS Joseph J. Kleiner, Woodmere, N. Y. A Aspiration November s, 1949, sesamo; 125.828

' 'a claims. (c1. 12s-27s) y This invention relates to a structurally and functionally improved assembly for use with fluids-such as blood- Which are to undergo bacteriological tests.

It is an object of the invention to furnish a unitary assembly capable of being readily used by a physician or technician and by means of which the involved procedure heretofore followed in the taking and testing of such samples a hypodermic syringe is avoided. Accordingly. aside from the savings which are effected, both in time and expense, and the convenience to the user, the danger of faulty results occurring is reduced to a minimum. Y,

A further object is that of providing an assembly embracing relatively few and rugged parts, which may be economically produced and the use of which will involve a simple procedural technique. y

With these and other objects in mind, refer- 4ence is had to the attached sheet of drawings illustrating one practical embodiment of the invention and in which:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a receptacle forming a part of the present assembly with "the cap broken away to disclose underlying construction; Fig. 2 is an elevation of a tube unit forming a part of the assembly and which mounts at its opposite ends piercing cannula, the enclosing structures for which have been shown 1n section;

Fig. 3 is a sectional View of the upper portiony of the receptacle together with its stopper and showing the piercing cannula for the latter extending therethrough; and Y n l Fig. 4 is a similar view showing that cannula in association with an adapter and further receptacle. Y I

Referring primarily to Fig. 1, the numeral 5 indicates the body of a receptacle preferably of glass. It should be transparent or semi-transparent. In many respects it is preferred to employ a receptacle or bottle having a capacityof about 4 fluid ounces. For exemplifying the invention, the receptacle will be considered as having a capacity of 100 cc. It may, of course, be larger or smaller. As hereinafter described, it is preferred that its neck mount a cap. 'I o this end, the exterior of the neck may be formed with a thread 6. The receptacle receives nutrient solution. That solution. according to the present invention, may lill its body to substantially 50 per cent.

In Fig. 1 the body of the solution has been indicated by the reference numeral 1. vSuch solution `mayembrace peptone soy broth, al-

though other nutrient may be employed. To this broth there is added-a gas which isppreferably soluble yor absorbable in, but does not react with. the nutrient. Such a gas is preferably CO2. According to the present teachings it is proposed that the volume of gas be from 3V to 5 cc. to furnish a total body of solution ofv 50 cc. within the receptacle'. The gas maybe added after the broth has been introduced into the receptacle and the interior of the latter placed under a substantial vacuum. The gas. under these circumstances, may be absorbed into the body ofthe broth;V f n K visible upon the exterior of the receptacle are indicia aembracing a series of graduations. Ac-

cording to the present invention these graduations may, as shown, be disposed inthe form of a group on the upper portion ofthe receptacle and intervening the upper 4surface of the contained solution 1 and the receptacle inlet. The graduations conveniently begin with 10 and end at 30; the upper level of the solution indicating 0 on the scale. Therefore it is obvious that measured 'amounts of additional liquid may be disposed within the interior of the receptacle under vthe control of the physician. Even if the maximum amount of blood or other biological fluid so added is on the order of '30' cc. there will be additional space existing between the 'upper level of the 'ientlire mass of liquid and the inlet of the recepac e.

The 'receptacle is protected from contamination of its upper lsurfaces by employing a cap 9. The latter may be of any suitable material and either lined or unlined. vDesirably it is formed with threads to cooperate with the thread 6.A In any event, it is formed with a bore I0 of relatively large diameter. lSterility is maintained and accidental movements of the cap with respectfto the receptacle is preventedI by a sealing strip II of Aplastic or other suitable material. This will overlap the skirt of cap 9, conveniently extending in contact with the lower edge of the Asame andengage the outer surface of the receptacle adjacent the base of its neck portion.

The inlet or neck of the receptacle is closed by a stopper. This stopper is formed of air-impervious material 'such as natural or artificial rubber. It includes a head portion l2 and aplug portion I3. The diameter ol' the head is 'greater than the inner diameter of the pouring lip of the receptacle. Preferably vthe diameter of the plug I3 is slightly greater than the bore within which itis to be disposed.A Both 'the headand plug are formed in their outer faces with resealing properties of the stopper will be even more pronounced than would otherwise be the case. Y

As shown especially in Fig. 2, a length of tubing I6 forms a part of the assembly'. .This tubing. j should be formed of rubber or other suitable material so that it will be flexible. Additionally, it should be at least light-transparent so that an. observer may determine whether and how far within the tube bore biologicaliiuid such as blood is presentj, Piercing needles are secured-one to each ed'ofthe tube in any acceptable manner. In thi'sR/'i'vs'f the numeral II indicates the needle for VeniK-"pun'ctv Iihe'nurneral I8 indicates a similar' needlev hich; may be of shorter length and which is vi'ded adjacent its hub portion withf'a l'screw threaded `part I 9Y Yor other coupling surface." Aspackagled; vboth needles are pro- Atected by"coverings" conveniently. formed of fibrous material. .Oneof these coverings may, aShereina'fter described, also act as a lter. AIf a 'separate'element is desired in the latterconn ection then such an element formed .of suitable material may,'of course, be provided. Referring to Fig; `4; the purposof coupling I9 will become apparent in thatan adapter 2| may be formed with a cooperating coupling surfaoefso that this end of the tube. I6 may be connected therewith. The adapter2 I conveniently receives a tube orother vessel 22,l the interior of which is under vacuuxn'and the open end of which is closed by a stopper4 23. rlfhatV stopper is similar or identical [with the stopper heretofore -described. Both Stoppers and their relationship to the receptacles with which they are associated may be as taught I-in'my prior kUnited States Patent; v2,216.3(){641v onfBlood Collecting Apparatus, datedFebruary 1,1949.

Y VIn' usingan apparatiis of this nature, the physician will loosen cap 9 after breaking or removing the sealing strip II. 'Ihe patients arm will be prepared' intheusual mannerrafter which the covering elem-ent A20 will beremoved from needle II.' With'the latter a Veni-puncture will now be made. Thelnature of this puncture may be determined vby `the Yoperator observing the flow of blood through thev boreof tube I6. When the columnof bloodreaches a position within tube' I6 adjacent the needle I8 the operator may compress or pinch the tubeat that point to prevent a further flow." Cap 9 is nowcompletely removed." Covering gelexnentl ZUVisremoved from needle IB and thepoint of theA latter `is plunged through diaphragm'` I5. TheV compressing or bindingaction'on th-e tube is now released and due tothe vacuum existing within the receptacle 5 the blood 'will flw into the latter. According tothe desire of thev physician, for example, lO'to 30."cc. Amay be allowedto thus be introduced into the receptacle.` 'OrdinarilyLZO cc. Ywill'be the approXimate'amount desired a cult-ure.. In any event,theamountwill be indicated by the levelof the 'entire'bodyA of liquid within thereceptlacle aligning'withlthedesied graduation 8:-

If an anaerobic test is to be made which would include bacilli of the gas gangrene group (clostridia), anaerobic streptococci, anaerobic staphylococci, etc. then with the level of the liquid in the receptacle reaching the desired point, the tubing is again pinched so as to interrupt further ow. Needle I8 is withdrawn from the partition I5 or diaphragm portion of the stopper; the puncture being self-sealing. Needle I'I is withdrawn .fromrtheivein and cap 9 is remounted -upon the receptacle. The purpose of the bore I0 or recessed portion of the cap now becomes apparent in that the latter may be freely detached from-or applied to the receptacle without disturbing the sealing function of the stopper. In other words, the bore I0 is of ample diameter. so4 that it will not frictionally engage Vthe head 'I 2 or other'parts of the stopper.

vIf' the blood specimen is to Ibe examined for the presence of aerobic organisms such as meningococci, brucella, etc., then., after the specimen hasibeen introduced in adequate volume into the interior ofthe receptacle, further flow is again interrupted by, for example, pinching thetubing lIat a point adjacentthebase or hub of needle I '1. This needle isznow removed from the patients arm. 'Thereupon a'filtering element such las 2,9 is applied to the needle and the compression on the tubing is released.l By this p rocedure'substantially all of the blood remaining Withinthe bore of the tube will be drawn into the receptacle. Atthe same time air will enter theY bore-of needle I'I and the bore of the tubing. This air flow will continue until air enters'the interior of the receptacle. As soon as this occurs, needle IB Amay be withdrawn from the diaphragm portionfl of the stopper and the receptacle mayhave cap 9 applied thereto. ".1 Y

It is obvious that if fluids other than blood are to be tested then a technique similar to that heretofore and'hereafter outlined may be followed. Under this latter grouping there might be Aincluded biological fluids, aswell as fluids generally and such as might be present in the processing of food products, etc..v e' l The laboratory technician, in case the biological fluid being tested isblood, will be able to'determine whetherY the Vspecimen is anaerobic or whether it has been collected by aerobic procedures by the color. Regardless 'of this he will be able. to determine the difference by tapping rthe bottle sharply. Underthos'e circumstances', if an anaerobic procedure has vbeen follwed a. denite and sharp click will behaard. Off .course if a test for facultative organisms ,-is'ftobernade, itis imfrnaterial'whichfof the two procedures afore'outlined is fc'illowedV because these organisms will grow under either condition. By preferably employingpeptone 4soy'bro'th, a medium suitable for generally universal use is provided. Carbon dioxide appears'to stimulate .growth of almo'stall bacteria. Itis necessary to the grfowth of certain bacteria.' By-ntrodcing it into the broth under conditions of vacuum it may be properly absorbed anddispersed. .e

If a separate blood sample'is to be drawn for a different type of ,test then it is v.apparent that needle I1 vmay be. left in position in thevein and ,needle .I8 may be withdrawn from the diaphragm I5. Under these v`circumstances a pinching of the tube may be resrted to to control the flow of blood as afore brought out. Threaded lportion I9 may nowbe coupledfto anadapter 2| as generally il- ,lusird iQFg-...rh ,Thereilnpm an evacuated .receptacle wel? 21S-22 mayfbe. employees@ which has its open end sealed by a stopper 23. This latter receptacle is associated with the adapter as shown so that the needle I8 may pierce the diaphragm of its stopper. Thereafter by permitting a flow of blood through the tube, receptacle 22 will be filled to the desired extent. After this a procedure may be followed such that air is or is not permitted to flow into receptacle 22 according to the decision of the physician. In any event needle I1 is withdrawn from the vein. As is also apparent fluid may be withdrawn from the receptacle 5 by inverting the latter and piercing the diaphragm l5 with needle l1. Needle It being associated with the adapter 2| and piercing the diaphragm of stopper 23 thedesired transfer may be effected. Similar procedures may be followed with fluids other than blood.

Thus, among others, the several objects of the invention as afore described are achieved. Obviously numerous changes in construction and rearrangement of the parts might be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined by the claims.

I claim:

1. In an assembly for testing blood, a hollow receptacle having a tubular inlet, a resilient stopp-er sealing said inlet and including a plug portion to extend in sealing contact with the bore defining said inlet, an enlarged head extending from said plug, said head being of a size to bear against the edge defining the entrance of said inlet and to arrest inward movement of the plug portion extending into the bore` of the same, both the head and plug portions being formed with recesses in their endv faces, an imperforate diaphragm separating the base portions of said recesses, said diaphragmwhen penetrated by a needle which is thereupon Withdrawn-being self-sealing, a nutrient solution and a gas within and partially filling said receptacle, said gas being soluble or absorable in but not reacting with said nutrient solution, the interior of said receptacle lbeing under less than atmospheric pressure and indicia associated solely with the upper part of the receptacle and visible on its exterior, said indicia being in the form of graduations intervening the upper surface of the nutrient solution and the inlet of said receptacle when the latter is supported in an upright position.

2. In an assembly for testing blood, a hollow receptacle having a tubular inlet, a resilient stopper sealing said inlet and including a plug portion to extend in sealing contact with the bore defining said inlet, an enlarged head extending from said plug, said head being of a size to bear against the edge defining the entrance of said inlet and to arrest inward movement of the plug portion extending into the bore of the same, both the head and plug portions being formed with recesses in their end faces, an imperforate dia- 6 phragm separating the base portions of said recesses, said diaphragm-when penetrated by a needle which is thereupon withdrawn-being selfsealing, a nutrient solution and a gas within and partially filling said receptacle, said gas being soluble or absorbable in but not reacting with said nutrient solution, the interior of Said receptacle being under less than atmospheric pressure and a flanged cap removably mounted on said receptacle adjacent the inlet thereof, said cap fiange having a bore substantially larger than the stopper head, whereby said cap may be disinounted Without disturbing the relationship of the plug and bore face.

3. In an assembly for testing blood, a hollow receptacle having a tubular inlet, a resilient stopper sealing said inlet and including a pierceable plug to extend in sealing contact with the bore defining said inlet, an enlarged head extending from said plug and of a size to bear against the edge defining the entrance of said inlet to arrest inward movement of the plug portion, a nutrient solution and a gas within and partially filling said receptacle, said gas being soluble or absorbable in but not reactive with said nutrient solution, the interior of said receptacle being under less than atmospheric pressure and indicia associated solely with the upper part of the receptacle and visible on its exterior, said indicia being in the form of graduations intervening the upper surface of the nutrient solution and the inlet of said receptacle when the latter is supported in an upright position.

JOSEPH J. KLEINER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,050,042 Sellar Jan. 7, 1913 1,389,659 Hollowood Sept. 6, 1921 1,168,270 Paisley et al Aug. 1, 1939 2,367,806 Shaw Jan. 23, 1945 2,388,634 DeWoody -Nov. 6, 1945 2,460,641 Kleiner Feb. 1, 1949 2,461,558 Meagher Feb. 15, 1949 OTHER REFERENCES Monograph on Systematic Bacteriology, A Compilation of Culture Media, by Max Levine and H. W. Schoenlein (1930) Published by Williams & Williams (Baltimore, Md.) p. 192, Formula 686 disclosing peptone soy broth. A copy is in Div. 63 of the Patent Office.

The Lancet for August 19, 1933, p. 433, Screw- Gapped Bottles in the Preparation and Storage of Culture Media, by I. E. McCartney. A copy is in Div. 63 of the Patent Office.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1050042 *May 13, 1912Jan 7, 1913William E MahoneyNeedle for hypodermic syringes.
US1168270 *Dec 14, 1914Jan 18, 1916Western Electric CoProtection device for electric circuits.
US1389659 *Oct 3, 1919Sep 6, 1921Hollowood Mathew JReceptacle for bacterial cultures
US2367806 *Aug 16, 1943Jan 23, 1945John E B ShawParenteral administration set
US2388634 *Dec 7, 1944Nov 6, 1945Ace Glass IncContainer for aseptic filling and dispensing of sterile liquids
US2460641 *Aug 14, 1945Feb 1, 1949Kleiner Joseph JBlood collecting apparatus
US2461558 *Dec 15, 1945Feb 15, 1949Meagher James ETransfusion apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2670740 *Sep 1, 1951Mar 2, 1954Cutter LabBlood transfer set
US2706702 *Feb 23, 1949Apr 19, 1955Baltimore Biolog LabMethod for culture of specimen
US2776242 *May 21, 1953Jan 1, 1957Asta Werke Ag Chem FabApparatus for providing fresh cultures of living micro-organisms
US2816545 *Jun 18, 1953Dec 17, 1957Jacoby George WFluid transfer apparatus
US3162195 *Jan 2, 1962Dec 22, 1964Peter DickVacuated body fluid collection vial
US3893892 *Feb 11, 1974Jul 8, 1975Becton Dickinson CoVenting assembly for the cultivation of microorganisms from body fluid
US3901765 *Feb 11, 1974Aug 26, 1975Becton Dickinson CoMethod for the collection, cultivation and identification of microorganisms from body fluid
US3904482 *Feb 11, 1974Sep 9, 1975Becton Dickinson CoMethod for the cultivation of microorganisms from body fluid
US3958572 *Dec 16, 1974May 25, 1976Corning Glass WorksBlood collecting and separating assembly stopper
US4246899 *Oct 23, 1978Jan 27, 1981Loseff Herbert SDrainage system for a collection of body fluids
US5102397 *Mar 24, 1989Apr 7, 1992Brunet Jean LouisSafety syringe for taking blood samples and for injections
US5478328 *Sep 2, 1993Dec 26, 1995Silverman; David G.For reducing risk of infection from material in hypodermic needles
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/577, 435/309.1, 604/148, 435/288.1
International ClassificationA61M1/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61M1/02
European ClassificationA61M1/02