Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2607503 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 19, 1952
Filing dateMar 4, 1946
Priority dateMar 4, 1946
Publication numberUS 2607503 A, US 2607503A, US-A-2607503, US2607503 A, US2607503A
InventorsRudolph Sonnenberg
Original AssigneeMid West Bottle Cap Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bottle closure
US 2607503 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 19, 1952 R. SONNENBERG BOTTLE CLOSURE Filed March 4, 1946 2 Sl-IEETS-Sl-IEET 1 I z Inventor Aug. 19, 1952 R, SQNNENBERG 2,6D7,503

BOTTLE CLOSURE A Filed March 4, 1946 2 SHEETS-WET 2 I nu Inventor Atiivs Patented Aug. 19, 1952 r I BOTTLE CLOSURE 1 Rudolph. Sonnenberg, Belvidere, 111., assignor t Mid-West Bottle Cap 00 7 poration of Illinois Belvidere, 111., a cor- Application March 4, 1946, Serial No. 651,741

, 1 This invention relates-to :bottle caps of the type employed for the closing of conventional dairy bottles of the type commonly used for the purpose of distributingireshmilk and cream,

I pressed down against the cap seat. As the art progressed this type of cap was in partreplaced by so-called hood caps formed of impregnated paper which the paper-came out over the pouring lip 'ofthe-lbottle and in someinstaneesdown around the bead on the outside ofthe bottle for the'purpose oflpreventing the'pou'ring lip from becoming icontaminated in handling, These so-called hood caps have not beenentirely'satisfactory,-and-continued experiment in theindustry I has resulted in the production of metal caps which have certain definite advantagesover the paper hoods, but a number of di'fiic ulties are also encountered with the use of metal caps, among. these disadvantages the tendency of the contents'lof the'bottle to creep outaround the cap along the interface betweenthe metal and the bottle. This is proibaiblyin part due to capillary action, and also probably due to expansion of the contents of the bottle which forcesthe airat the top of the bottle out through the space between the cap and the bottle surfa'ceyithe air carrying a small-amount of theliquid contents with it. Whatever the cause,- it is found that with. metal hood caps a small amount of thecontents of the bottl will frequently-be found around the edge. of the cap. This condition'is aggravated in extremely warm weather, and no satisfacto-ryivay has heretofore been found of pre-' venting vthis-'creepage. Furthermore, some consumers object to the fact that the metal of the cap -is'brought into contact with-the edible contentsof the bottle, though there app-ears to be no scientific evidenc that this is at all detrimental to dairy products; r

,"I' he+.principal object of the inventionis the provision of aimetal cap constructed to prevent creenageof th contents of the bottle out along fileii iie'rface between'the' c'ap and the-bottle.

12 Claims. (01. 215-38) A further-object of the invention is the provision of a cap formed principallyof metal wherein the metal is prevented from making contact with the contentsof the bottle. a Q

A still further object of the invention is the provisionof a'capformedes'sentiaHy of metal or like non-absorbent material having means disposed between the metal hood and the bottle adapted to expand on contact with the liquid contents of the bottleso as to efiectively seal the space between the caap and the bottle against creepage of theliquid. I

I have also aimedto provide a cap formed of a plurality of'layers of sheet material cemented together' by a plastically deformable adhesive which is displacedinto the capillary openings along the pleats or folds to improve "the seal; 7

Another object of the invention is the pro vision of a cap of thecharacter described so'constructed as'to be capable of use in commercial capping'm'achines Without alteration and capable of formation'and sale as a pre-iormed hood.

Other objects and advantages will appear from the following description and accompanying dra'wingsjinWhich-f I 4 c Figure 1 is a side viewof a stack of nested hoods embodying theinve ntion;

Fig. 2 is a top view thereof; Fig.- 3- is a vertical section through the, head of a dairy bottle showing an intermediate step in the seating of a specific embodiment of: the invention on the head of a bottle;

Fig. 4 is a side elevation partly in section show ing the cap in seated position Fig. 5 is a fragmentary enlarged view of a seated cap; I r

Fig. 6 isan enlarged sectional view through a 7 section of the bottle and through a pleat;

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 3 ShOWillg a modified form of cap,and

Fig. 8 is a sideelevation-partly in section showing the cap of Fig. '7in seated position.

The invention as herein shown in Figs. [1

through 5 is embodied in" aicap of the general type shown in S'onnenberg application Serial No. 343,407, filed July 1, 1940, now Patent No. 2,361,507, dated October 31,;1944, in which the hood is formed of thin metal foil asindicated at l0, such, for example, as aluminum orlead foil which serves to-provide an impervious hood member and also has such properties that" when the hood is folded it retains itself on the head of the bottle with sufiicientjrigidity to prevent its accidental removal but permits its removal without the' use of special tools. It will be understood that the metal in a cap of this character is of insufiicient rigidity to effectuate a complete seal in a manner analogous to that of so-called crown caps, and consequently there is a possibility of creepage along the surface of the cap. In this embodiment of the invention a two-piece cap is employed, one comprising the hood member in.- dicated generally by the'numeral 6, and the other a conventional diskas indicated at '7 adapted to seat on the top of the hood member and be forced down to a point adjacent the cap seat in the mam. ner shown in Figs. 3 andd. This specific em bodiment as described in said Sonnenberg'application is designed to present certain advantages in the feeding and in the mechanics of the capping operation which need not be further described here, the hood member having an annue larly flared skirt as indicated'by the numeral 8, a rim-engaging portion 9, a cap disk shoulder ll. upon which the cap disk l is placed as shown in Fig. 3, r m-meeainan rt cn 9 and t e. h w

l ac iuet e t r the. isk on. he hood. me

' when the i k. dumped h re n r n th cess stock for this purpose so thatthe seatin of the disk does not materially draw the metal in this ea an hus reduce. it i k ss an s h.- e skir sert qu s pr v ded: w t ennulefly ce o d in ludin pqrt onsa in-. dicat'ed at [3 disposed at an angle approaching right angles to the remainder of the skirt and these arcuate portions serving as cams to sepa: rate the hood members; by 'turning of; the lowermost o em r a taQkr. he m-en a ing porti n' is o de Witha plu a ity of ribs 15 whichiserve to strengthenthe metalin this area; and serve to absorb the excess metal thereby avoid the necessity for drawing themetal of the cap to excessive thinness, 'l he foilemployed in the formation of the hoodis-relatively thin,- and in most instances willhave a th ckness of about .0015. The thickness of themetal will vary somewhat with the severity; of the conditions in service, but in general metal from .001 170.0025" will be found satisfactory, but it should be. such that it can be readily distorted bythe bare fingers of the operator to an extent sufficient for the removal of the cap from the bottle without tools of any kind. While heavier section of metal may be employed, I find no particular advantage in increasing this thickness, because the cost of the cap increases with the increasing thickness.

According to the present invention, the hood member comprises a thin metal hood and a layer of paper or similar material of substantiallyzidentical configuration, theinner surface of" the hood being lined. with the layer ofi-paper as indicated.

at i6, the thickness of thispaper being of the duced by solvent separation from residual petrolatums. These waxes have a high degree of adhesiveness and consequently bond the foil and the paper together in a highly satisfactory manner. In addition, they are non-hydroscopic and consequently resistant to water. In addition, they have a high melting point, are not brittle, and ar'e ducti-le so as :to be capable of cold flow. One such wax suitable for'the purpose is that sold by Socony Vacuum Oil 00., under the name S/V Cerese. As will be seen particularly from Fig. 5, a layer of this adhesive wax is interposed between the foil and the paper, as shown in exaggerated form. atv 38.. Preferably, the paper i given an impregnation with wax to render the same relatively imperviousto moisture, and therefore in the preferred embodiment of the invention, the

paper consists of a layer of suitably waxed paper adhered to the inner surface of the hood.

In practice this paper lining is applied to the sheet foil prior to the formation of the hood member, and the hood member is; then formed between suitable dies by employing-the paper-lined foil stock to 'produce a, laminated: hood member, as

s 20mm iss- 1,. .v 3 and. B yof. ex-

ample, I haveused with satisfactiona 11 member formed from stock comprising metal foil of I .0015 gauge mounted on.20 lb. bond paper with 8 lb. of Cerese wax per ream of, paper. In this particular instance the. bond; members are sup-- plied tothe trade in; nested stacks as shown in Figure. 1, adapted to; be placed.- in the magazine ofa capping machinefrom-which they. are withdrawn in succession and dropped upon the head of a bottle in the manner shown. in Figs. 3; and '7, -W the r l de i nates. he. c of the bottle, the numeral [9, indicates; the bead,- the numeral 2| indicates the rim; of the, bottle. and thenumeral 22-the cap seat;

. In .the embodiment shown in Figs. li-iia disk 1 similar to the conventional disk cap is. then dropped onto the. hocd;-.t rest on the cap. disk shoulder II as shown in; Fig.3 Thereafter the, disk 1 is forced downward, bringing; the rimengaging portion. 9 of the hood memberzagainst. the rimof thebottle the: disk; thereafter moving 7 downward with respect to, the. hood. members the metal in heri ats; as indicatedat. 24.

(Fig. 4), the metal ofthe hood irising... in some instances, in additicnat ribsas indicated at 2.5, the size of these ribs depending-somewhat; on thecurvature of-thebead;

The skirt of-the hood is pressedi tightly against te c ofithe; bottle by. suitable capping means, such, for-example. as; by: a rubber Wall of a pneumatic cap so;as to,v tightly compact the folds and ribs. Because of the extra thick.- ness of material inthefolds: and-.ribareasthese are subjected to higher pressure than. the balance of the skirt and because;of-thisrhigher-pressure the intermediate layer of wax: is plastically displaced and caused to flow into the small cracks and crevices of the fold, as: illustrated diagrammatically in Fig, 6. Thus;.the layer of microcrystalline wax serves; noironlyi as an adhesive for secllringthe foiland thepaper together but this layer also serveszini the-sealing of the hood onto the mouth of the bottle because of its ductility and flowproperties. Thus, this layer of wax when displaced by the capping operation acts to .fill the small capillaries and openings which might otherwise be present alongthe folds or pleats, as :will be'apparentfrom Fig. 6. The bottle thus capped will normally have previously been filled with a liquid such, for example, as milk, and during this fillingoperation a small amount of milk is frequently left along the mouth of the, bottle and on the cap-seats, so that these parts of the bottle are frequently wet, and during the capping operation the paper liner of the hood memberfcomes into contact with these wet surfaces; While the paper, has been impregnated with wax, this impregnation is not suflicient to completely prevent'slowvabsorption of the moisture, and therefore the paper liner gradually absorbs this moisture and in doing so swells, so

that the thickness thereof is increased slightly as shown by the greater thickness of the liner at 26 in Fig. 5. Likewise the handling of the bottle tends to cause the liquid to come into contact with the depressed central portion 12 of the cap s as tofurther moisten the liner, also tending to expand the liner slightly after the cap has been seated. This expansion of the paper liner causes a sealing actlonto occur so as to seal the cap against leakage along the interface, and also serves to absorb the liquid on the wallsof the bottle'and on the cap seat. In this way creepage of the contents of the bottle out from under the cap is prevented. In addition, this action tends to cause the cap to be gripped more tightly in the mouth of the bottle due to th expansion, and the frictional contact is further increased by the moist state of the liner, which has a greater frictional resistance to slippage along the surface of the glass.- Furthermore, the liner serves the additional function of preventing the liquid contents of the bottle from coming directly into contact with the metal.

In the embodiment shown in Figs, 7 and 8 the paper lined foil stock heretofore described is preformed into a hood having a. flat mouth spanning portion 3| and an annular pleated skirt 32, the skirt 32 being substantially identical in form with the skirt 8, thepleats 33 being folded about the head of the bottle in a similar manner. It will be seen that in this instance the liquid contents of the bottle comes into contact with the lower surface of the portion 3| and the paper liner I6 absorbsmoisture in this area and along the mouth of the bottle as shown at 34 to facilitate sealing as described in connection'with the first described embodiment.

I claim: 1

1. Thecombination in ahood cap-for dairy bottles of a hood member comprising a hood of metal foil capable of ready distortion with the bare fingers of the user for removal from the bottle, said hood being shaped to span the mouth of the bottle andbeing adapted to be peripherally crimped against the outer'side thereof, a paper liner substantially coextensive with said hood attached to the side thereof adjacent said bottle, and a layer of microcrystalline wax in terposed between the foil and the liner for adhesively securing them together, said wax being displaceable under capping pressure into crevices between the hood and the outer side of the bottle to seal th interface therebetween.

2; The combination in a hood cap for dairy bottlesof a hoodmember comprising a hood of metal foil capable of ready distortion with the bare fingers of the user for removal from the bottle, said hood being shaped to span the mouth of ,the bottle and beingv adapted. to be peripherally crimped againstv the outer side thereof, a paper liner substantially coextensive with said hood attached to the side thereof adjacent said bottle, and a layer of microcrystalline wax interposed between the foil and the liner for adhesively securing them together, said wax bein displaceable under capping pressure into crevices between the hood and the outer side of the bottle to seal the interface therebetween, said liner having a composition to expand to a limited degree upon contact with theliquid in the bottle to seal the spacebetween the hood and the bottle adjacent the interior of the bottle.

3. The combination in a hood cap for dairy bottles of the type having a bead and a cap, seat of a hood member comprising a thin ductile metal hood shaped to seat into the mouth of the bottle to a point adjacent the cap seat and over the mouth and bead of the bottle, apaper liner for said hood disposed adjacent one side of the hood to contact the bottle, and a layer of microcrystalline wax interposed between the hood member and the liner for adhesively securing them together, said wax being displaceable in the area about the bead of the bottle, under capping pressure into crevices produced by folding the cap againstthe bead to seal the interface therebetween. w. 7

4. The combinationin a hood cap for dairy bottles of the type having a bead and a cap seat of a hood member comprising a thin ductile metal hood shaped to seat into the mouth of the bottle to a point adjacent the cap seat and over the mouth and bead of the bottle, a paper liner for said hood disposed adjacent oneside of the hood and engageable with the bottle, and a layer of microcrystalline wax interposed between the hood member and the liner for adhesively securing them together, said wax being displaceable in: the area about the bead of, the bottle under capping pressure into crevices produced by folding the cap against the bead to seal the interface therebetween, said liner having a composition to absorb liquid from adjacent the cap seat and expand to a limited degree to seal the space between the hood and the bottle in the area adjacent the cap seat.

5. The combination in a hood cap for dairy bottles of the type having a bead and a cap seat of a hood member comprising a hood of thin ductile metal having a thickness of approximately .001 to .0025 inch capable of ready distortion by the bare fingers of the user for removal from the bottle having a central depressed mouth spanning portion and a skirt portion pleated to define folding lines for crimping the cap around and substantially over the bead of the bottle to retain the cap thereon, a liner for said hood having a thickness of the same order as said hood and substantially coextensive therewith complemental in shape thereto and attached to the side of said hood-adjacent the bottle, and a layer of microcrystalline wax interposed between the hood and the linerfor adhesively securing them together, said wax being displaceable under capping pressure into the crevices formed by the folding lines along the bead of the bottle, said liner having'a composition to absorb liquid on the surface of the bottle and expand to a limited degree in the mouth spanning portion to seal the cap on the bottle and to prevent expansion of the contents of-the bottle'from forcing said surface liquid. out around the edges of said hood member. I ,r ,7

(ii-The combination in a hood cap for dairy bottlesvof: the typev having a bead and a cap seat of a hood" member comprising a thin ductile metal hood' having a thickness of approximately .001 l to .0025 inchpleated to be ,crimped around the bead of the bottle to retain the capthereon capable of ready-='distortion with the bare fingers of the user for removal from the bottle shaped to seat intothe mouth of the bottle to a point adjacent the cap' seat and over the mouth and bead of the bottle, a liner for said hood having a thickness of the same order'as said hood attached thereto and disposed against the area thereof Which-contacts the bottle, and a layer of microcrystalline wax interposed between the hood member and the liner for adhesively securing them together, said wax being displaceable under capping pressure -against'the pleats into the crevices caused by 'the-pleats'to seal the bottle along the bead said-liner being of sheet material of a compositiontto absorb liquid from the wall and cap seat of-said bottle and expand to a limited degree upon absorption thereof to seal the space between the hood and the bottle adjacent the capseatp r '7. The combination in-a-hoo d cap for dairy bottles of thetype having a bead and'a cap seat of a hood member having a central depressed mouth spanning portion and a pleated skirt portion extending downwardly: along the bead of the bottle and contracted thereunder to retain the cap thereon, and a separate disk member of stiff paper disposed in the mouth of the bottle on top of said mouth spanning portion adjacent the cap seat of the bottle, said hood member comprising a hood of thin ductile metal having a thickness of approximately .001 to .0025 inch capable of ready distortion with the bare fingers of the user for removal from thebottle, a liner'for said hood disposed adjacent the-bottom of: said hood to engage the bottle, and a layer of microcrystalline,

wax interposed between the hood and'the liner adhesively securing them together, said wax beingidisplaceable in the area of the pleats under capping pressure applied tothe pleats to close the crevices formed between the pleats and seal the interface at the bead, said liner being of sheet material having a thickness-70f the same order as said hood and of a composition to absorb liquid from the wall and cap seatof saidbcttle and expand to. a limited degree. uponabsorption thereof to seal the space between the hood and the bottle in the area of the cap seat.

8. The combination in a hood. cap for dairy bottles of the type having a bead and a cap seat of a hood member comprising a hood of thin ductile metal having a thickness of approximately .001 to .0025 inch capable of ready distortion by the bare fingers of the user for removal from the bottle having a central depressed mouth spanning, portion and a skirt portion pleated to define foldinglines for crimping: the cap aroundiand substantially over the bead of the bottle toretain the cap thereon and a liner for said hoodhavinga thickness of the same order as said hood and substantially coextensive therewith complemental in shape. thereto and attached to the side of said, hood adjacent the bottle, said liner having a composition to absorb liquid on the surface of the bottle to. a limited degree to prevent expansion of the contents of the bottle from, forcing said surface liquid cut around the edges of said hood'member.

8 91 The. combination in ahoodcap for dairy bcttlesof the type having a bead and acap seat ofahood member comprising a thin ductile metal hood having a thickness of approximately .001v toi.0025 inch pleated'tobe crimped around the bead of the bottle to-retain the .cap thereon capable of ready distortion with theibare fingers of the user for removal from the bottle shaped to seat into the mouth of the bottle to a point adjacent the cap 7 seat and over the mouth and bead of the bottle, and a liner for said hood hav-. ing a thickness of the same order as said hood attached thereto and vdisposedagainst the area thereof which contacts the-bottle, said liner being of sheet material ofaicomposition to absorb liquid from the wall and caprseat of said bottle and expand to a limited degreeupon absorption thereof toseal the'space between the hood and thebottle. f

10. The combinationin' a hood cap for dairy bottles of the type having a bead and a cap seat of a'hood member having'a central depressed mouth spanning portion an inner wall engaging portion'and a skirt portion extendingdownwardly alongthe bead of the bottle and adapted to be contracted thereunder to retain the cap thereon, and a separate disk member of stiff paper of such size as to force said inner wall against the inner surface of the bottle and bein disposed on'top of said mouth spanning portion adjacent the cap seat of the bottle, said hood member comprising a hood of thin ductile metal having a thickness of approximately .001 to .0025 inch capable of ready distortion with the bare fingers of the user for removal from the bottle, and a liner for said hood disposed against the bottom ofsaid. hood for engaging the bottle, said liner being of sheet material having a thickness of the same'order as said'hood of a composition to absorb liquid from the wall and cap seat of said bottle and expand to a limited degree upon absorption thereof to seal the space between the hood and the bottle. 7 V

11. The combination in" a hood cap for dairy bottles of the type having-a bead and a cap seat of a hood member having a central depressed mouth spanning portion, a rim engaging portion having an inner wall, and a skirtportion extending downwardlyalong the bead of the bottle and adapted to be contracted thereunder to retain the cap thereon, and a separate disk member of stiff paper being of such a size'as to force-said innerwall against the inner surface of the bottle and being disposed on top of said mouth spanning portion adjacent the cap seat of the bottle, said hood member comprising a hood of thin ductile metal having a thickness of approximately .001 to .0025 inch capable of ready distortion with the bare fingers ofthe user for removal from the bottle, and'a paper liner for said hood having a thickness of the same order'as said hood substantially coextensive therewith attached against thebottom surface of said hood in the area which contacts the bottle, said linerhaving a composition to expand to a limited degree upon contact with the'liquid in the bottle to seal the space between the hood and the bottle.

12. The combination in a hood cap for dairy bottles of a hood member, comprising a hood of metal foil capable of ready distortion with the bare fingers of the user for removal from the bottle, said hood being shaped to span the mouth of the bottle and being a-da-pted to be peripherally crimped against the; outer side thereof, a paper liner substantially"co-extensive with said 9 hood attached to the side thereof adjacent said bottle, and a layer of plastic material interposed between the foil and the liner for adhesively securing them together, said plastic material being displaceable between the hood and paper under capping pressure to close crevices between the hood and the outer side of the bottle, said liner having a composition to expand to a limited degree upon contact with the liquid in the bottle, said displacement of the plastic material to close the crevices and said expansion of the liner efiecting a liquid tight seal along the interface between the bottle and the hood.

RUDOLPH SONNENBERG.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

Number Number 10 UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Stokes May 17, 1918 Tevander Mar. 30, 1920 Dreymann Feb. 18, 1936 Sonnenberg Oct. 31, 1944 Wilcox Mar. 12, 1946 Barnby et a1 Apr. 2, 1946 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Great Britain Nov. 30, 1933 Great Britain Nov. 16, 1934

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1265132 *Nov 14, 1917May 7, 1918Henry W StokesMoldable paper-board for closures, containers, and the like.
US1335538 *Feb 1, 1919Mar 30, 1920Nils Tevander SwanBottle-cap
US2031036 *May 17, 1934Feb 18, 1936Grant Paper Box CompanyComposition of matter and method
US2361507 *Jul 1, 1940Oct 31, 1944Mid West Bottle Cap CoBottle cap and method for making the same
US2396358 *May 20, 1942Mar 12, 1946Oswego Falls CorpArticle formed of laminated sheet material
US2397589 *May 1, 1943Apr 2, 1946Owens Illinois Glass CoContainer closure
GB402313A * Title not available
GB419684A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4190188 *May 5, 1978Feb 26, 1980Honshuseishi Kabushiki KaishaContainer and cone for same
US5702019 *Sep 27, 1995Dec 30, 1997Becton Dickinson France S.A.Vial having resealable membrane assembly activated by a medical delivery device
US5871110 *Sep 13, 1996Feb 16, 1999Grimard; Jean-PierreTransfer assembly for a medicament container having a splashless valve
US5873872 *Sep 17, 1996Feb 23, 1999Becton Dickinson And CompanyMultipositional resealable vial connector assembly for efficient transfer of liquid
US5925029 *Sep 25, 1997Jul 20, 1999Becton, Dickinson And CompanyMethod and apparatus for fixing a connector assembly onto a vial with a crimp cap
US6003566 *Feb 26, 1998Dec 21, 1999Becton Dickinson And CompanyVial transferset and method
US6003702 *Sep 27, 1995Dec 21, 1999Becton Dickinson France, S.A.Vial with resealable connector assembly having a membrane and a multi-configuration fluid access device
US6090093 *Sep 25, 1997Jul 18, 2000Becton Dickinson And CompanyConnector assembly for a vial having a flexible collar
US6168037Aug 4, 1997Jan 2, 2001Becton Dickinson France, S.A.Resealable vial with connector assembly having a membrane and pusher
US6189580Dec 6, 1999Feb 20, 2001Becton, Dickinson And CompanyVial transferset and method
US6209738Oct 20, 1999Apr 3, 2001Becton, Dickinson And CompanyTransfer set for vials and medical containers
US6213994Sep 25, 1997Apr 10, 2001Becton Dickinson France, S.A.Method and apparatus for fixing a connector assembly onto a vial
US6378576Jun 7, 2001Apr 30, 2002Becton Dickinson And CompanyVial transferset and method
US6378714Oct 20, 1999Apr 30, 2002Becton Dickinson And CompanyTransferset for vials and other medical containers
US6382442Oct 8, 1998May 7, 2002Becton Dickinson And CompanyPlastic closure for vials and other medical containers
US6571837Jan 23, 2001Jun 3, 2003Becton Dickinson France S.A.Transfer set for vials and medical containers
US6626309Oct 5, 2000Sep 30, 2003Becton Dickinson France S.A.Transfer set
US6681946Sep 20, 2000Jan 27, 2004Becton, Dickinson And CompanyResealable medical transfer set
US6904662Apr 24, 2001Jun 14, 2005Becton, Dickinson And CompanyMethod of sealing a cartridge or other medical container with a plastic closure
US6945417Nov 26, 2003Sep 20, 2005Becton, Dickinson And CompanyResealable medical transfer set
US6957745Jan 29, 2002Oct 25, 2005Becton, Dickinson And CompanyTransfer set
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/292, 215/326, 215/325
International ClassificationB65D41/02, B65D41/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D41/14
European ClassificationB65D41/14