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Publication numberUS2608243 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 26, 1952
Filing dateDec 8, 1948
Priority dateDec 8, 1948
Publication numberUS 2608243 A, US 2608243A, US-A-2608243, US2608243 A, US2608243A
InventorsKostrowski Stanley J
Original AssigneeKostrowski Stanley J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Removable seat and back units for upholstered furniture
US 2608243 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Allg- 25, 1952 s. J. KosTRowsKl 2,608,243

REMOVABLE SEAT AND BACK UNITS FOR UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE Filed Deo. 8, 1948 2 SHEETS- Sx-XEET 1 w @f9.1 /7 2/ I 1 /g Z3 lh "l i f 24 k l l* L l\ t 27 4o umIl vm it )Il M' l -f/s llhil lill* 'v ,lf-:tjf- TllL ill v /NVE/VTO STANLEY J'. KGSTROWSK/ ATTOP/VE V5 Aug. 26, 1952 s. J. KosTRowsKl 2,608,243

RFNOVABLF sFAT AND BACK UNITs FoR UFNOLSTFRFU FURNITURE Filed Dec. e, 194s 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 Evan 23 60 Gl T fr fe V L ih:

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-i v v v v v vv /NVENTOQ STANLEY J'.- KOSTQOWS/(l A TTOQ/VE YS Patented Aug. 26, 1952 UNITED vsTrtrEs PATENT OFFICE REMovAfBLE sEA'r AND BACKUNITSl Foa UPnoLsrEnEn FURNITURE `Stanley J; Kostrowsk, Jersey City, N. VJ

` Application December 8, 1948,' SerialNo. 64,082

13 Claims. (Cl.155-180) It is an object of this invention to f provide 'an upholstered chair of greater comfort than heref tofore possible. w

VA further object is to decrease the; laborv required in the manufacture of such furnituref Another object is to'facilitate the repairs 'of upholstered furniture. f f Y It is also an object of the instant invent-ion to'reduce the cost of distributionof furniture. YAn additional object is to increase the useful life of upholstered furniture.

Other objects of the instant` invention will become apparent in the course V- of the following specification. Y

In the accomplishment of these objectives, the inside of the arms of any chair frame designed to be upholstered are first formed and the inside cover of the arms attached as well as the outer covers of the arms and back. In the framework `of the back, a removable back member is'inserted while in the framework of the seat, a removable seat member is inserted. vThe removable members are unique in thelmethod off attaching fthe covers and related members. HRather'thanusing the` well known webbing tackedalong the edges of theback and seat frameworks; theremovable back and seat members are made Withindividual frames designed to be tted into corresponding positions of the chair. Along the base of the separate frames are protuberances which,Y after the burlap and iillingl and cover are in position over thesprings, are designed to be bent over the edges of the burlap and cover holding thev same nsecurely in place and making each oftheY members ifconnection with the accompanying drawing showing, by way of example, a preferred embodiment of the inventive idea.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a front elevational view of an upholstered chair partially broken away to show fragmentary portions of the removable back and seat members in place and constructed vin accordance with the principles of this invention. Figure 2 is a sectional view along the line 2-2 of Figure 1. Y. I

Figure 3 is an enlarged view of the upper left hand corner of the back unit shown in Figurerl.

Figure 4 is a sectionalview along the line 4`-4 of Figure 3. 1

Figure 5 is an enlarged perspective view of the frame of the back and seat units showingehow the material is held in place. f

Figure 6 is a sectional View along the line 6 6 ofFigure2. f n Y Figure 7 is a sectional View along the line 1-1 of Figure 2. Y

- Figure 8 is a sectional view along the line 8^8 of Figure 6 but on an enlarged scale.

Figure 9 is a sectional view along the line 9 9 of Figure 6 and also on an enlarged scale.

Figure 10 is an enlarged fragmentary View of the frame of-the seat unit showing the method of releasably attaching the seat unit tothe front of the chair. I f

Figure l1 is a sectional view along the line II-II of Figure 10. Y

Figure l2 is a perspective view of the replaceable sleeve for the frame of the back and seat units. l

Referring now in greater detail to the drawings in which like reference numerals indicatelike parts, reference numeral I0 (Figs. 1 and 2) indicates the upholstered chair, I I the removable back member, and I2 the removable seat member..

The chair I0 is constituted of the upholstered arms I3 and I4 (Fig. 1), the back framework I5 (Fig. 2), and the seat framework 16.

The upholstered arms I3 and I4 are formed in the usual manner.

The back framework I5 is made with the spaced parallel side members I'I and I8 (Figs. 1 and 2), and the spaced parallel top member I9 (Fig. 2) and bottom member 20 which may be joined along corresponding ends in the usual manner. Within the back framework I5 are the second members 2| and 22 (Figs. 1 and 7) Vspaced parallel to the side members I'I and I 8, extending between the top and bottom members I9 and 20 and substantially in the line of intersection of the plane of the insidesurface portions ofthe arms I3 and I4 extended with the back framework I5. Of course, the positioning of the second members may be varied as desired and even the design 'of the back framework could bechanged. The back framework I5 is attached tothe seat sharp edge from excessive wear on the subse-v quently described burlap and cover.A long `the bottom of the non-turned portion-of the angle bars is a row of tooth-like protuberances 24.

in a known manner to maintain the same in a proper position.

The seat framework I6 (Fig. 2) is made with the spaced parallel side members 45 and 46 (Fig. 6), and the front member 41 spaced parallel to the back member 48, said members being secured along corresponding ends in a known manner.

Within the seat framework I 6 is the removable seat unit I2 also formed of the angle bars previously described and constituted of the opposed side members 49 and 50, the front member 5I in opposed relationship to the back member 52.

, l'I-'he length of the members 49, 50, 5I, and 52 is which may be formed integral withthe body pori tion by stamping or otherwise.v 'Ihe-protuberserted through the burlap and cover and then turned thereover. One protuberance 24 may be seen in Figure in the unbent position and two in the bent position after having been passed through the burlap and cover. Y

The angle bars are formed into1 a frame for the removable back member (Fig. '7) in which there is an upper rectangular portion 25 vand a lower rectangular portion 26 separated by the common member 21. The upper rectangular portion 25 is formed with the opposed end members 28 and 29, the top member 30, the common member 21 elongated by the end members 3l and 32 and spaced parallel to the top member 30. While the positioning of the common member 21 and associated end members 3I and 32 in the frame may be varied, it has been found desirable to havethe same substantially along the line of intersection of the plane of the top surface portions of the arms I3 and I4 extended with the back framework I5. The common member 21 need not necessarily be an angle bar but the end extensions 3| and 32 are and carry along the bottom surface portions thereof the previously mentioned protuberances '24. The various members are fastened along corresponding ends by any suitable means.

The lower rectangular portion 26 is made with the common member 21 and the bottom member 33 spaced parallel thereto and the spaced parallel end members 34 and 35 which are secured along correspondingends in a known manner. Y

The top member of the upper rectangular portion 25 is releasably attached tothe top member of the back framework I9 by the catches 36, 31, and 38 which are illustrated in Figure 4. In this gure it will be noted that the nonturned portion of the angle bar with the burlap and cover secured by the protuberances 24 is releasably slid between the catch and the outside surface portion of the top` member IE).y Somewhat similar catches 39 vand 49 are disposed onthe second members 2i and 22 for the releasable support of the common member 21. As shown in Figure 7, the spaced parallel side members 28 and 29 ofthe upper rectangular portion 25 are supported by the upper part of the spaced parallel side members I1 and I8 of the back framework I5 while the spaced parallel side members 34 and 35 of the lower rectangular portion 2G are supported by the lower part of the second members 2| and 22 of the back framework I5. Intermediate the spaced parallel side members of the removable frame are the spaced parallel supports 4 I, 42, and 43 upon which the known spring members 44 are mounted in a kno-wn mannen The spring members 44 may be fastened together at the top :less thanthe length of the corresponding members of the seat framework so that the removable seat can be substantially inserted therein. The

various members are attached as desired along corresponding ends and the side members 49 and 50 flare upwardly and outwardly at the front as best seen in Figures Zand 9 to compensate for the variation in elevation of the upper edge of the front member 41 compared with the points of attachment 53a (Fig. 2) along the back of the seat framework I6 (Fig. 2). Along the front member 5I of the frame of the seat unit I6 are the similar key openings 53 which are removably attached over the screws 54 as shown in Figure 10. Within the frame of the seat unit I6 are the spaced parallel spring supports 55, 56, 51, and 58, similar to the previously described spring supports 4 I, 42, and 43 for the removable back member II, which support the springs 59 interconnected in the plane of the top portions thereof in any known manner. Spring members 60 support the sides of the frame within the seat framework as shown. In addition, suspension springs 6I (Fig. 2) under tension are connected between the bottom member 33 of the removable back member and the removable back member 52 of the removable seat unit I2 as shown in Figures 2 and 6.

The operation is as follows:

A chair frame is first made in the usual manner. The removable back and seat members with the springs attached or otherwise are then made by the spring manufacturer ready for the filling and covers which are attached by virtue of the protuberances 24 eliminating the use of tacks and webbing. Manufactured paddings as now supplied are ideal for this method of manufacture and there is no need for special or extra reinforcements or frames as now required for some types of springs. The tops of the springs may be secured in the usual manner after which the burlap member 62 (Fig. 5) and the cover 63 are inserted with the filling therebetween as desired and the edges of the burlap 62 and cover 63 inserted over the open protuberances 24 which are then bent overv the outside surface portion of the cover as shown in Figure 5. The removable back member II is then inserted in the back framework with the fiat surface portion of the angle bar forming the spaced parallel top member 30 inserted in the catches 36, 31, and 38, and the common member 21 in the catches 39 and 40. To hold the back member II down tightly onthe catches, one or more springs 6I (Fig. 2) are connected between the bottom of the removable back member II and the back of the removable seat member I 2. The removable seat member I2 is next inserted with the key openings 53 in the spaced parallel front member 5I over the screws 54 after which the springs 60 are attached between corresponding side and back members of the seat frame work and removable unit as shown.

By this arrangement, sagging bottoms are eliminated, extra spring action given the seat for added comfort, and the life of the seat member substantially increased. Moreover, by this arrangement, show room space is saved because one chair can be equipped with different removable back and seat members the better to sho-w how the chair will look with different treatments. If and when the removable back and sea't members need repair, the work may be accomplished without removing the chair from the premises. If when making repairs, the protuberances 24 are lost, the sleeve 62a (Fig. l2), is slipped over the base portion of the angle bar to supply new protuberances 24.

Of course, a rubber top may be used in place of the springs and lling and the support bars for the springs or rubber may be run in two directions (not shown) and laced or riveted where crossed.

It is apparent that the specific illustrations shown above have been given by way of illustration and not by way of limitation and that the structures shown above are subject to wide variation and modification without departing from the scope or intent of the present invention. All of such variations and modifications are to be included Within the scope of the present invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In a chair having upholstered arms, back and seat frameworks, the back framework having spaced top and bottom andside members, the side members being constricted between the up-` holstered arms; a removable upholstered back for the back framework in combination with a removable upholstered seat for the seat framework, the removable back comprising a frame of angle irons, the frame having spaced top and bottom members and side members coacting with corresponding members of the rear framework, one side of the angle irons being in the plane of the back framework and the other side extending forwardly thereof along the outer periphery of the angle iron frame, the side of the angle irons in the plane of the back framework having rearwardly directed protuberances formed thereon, spring supports disposed between the top and bottom members of the angle iron frame and one spring support between the side members at the points of constriction, a catch disposed at both ends of the top member of the back framework coacting with the top member of the angle iron frame, a catch disposed on both side members of the back framework substantially at the points of constriction and coacting with the spring support between the side members of the angle iron frame, a cover disposed over the springs and removably secured by the protuberances on the angle irons, and spring tension means between the bottom member of the angle iron frame and the removable seat and between the removable seat and the seat framework.

2. In a chair having upholstered arms, back and seat frameworks, the seat framework having spaced front and back and side members; a. removable upholstered seat for the seat framework in combination with a removable upholstered back for the back framework, the removable seat comprising a frame of angle irons, the frame comprising spaced front and back and side members, the side members extending upwardly and forwardly at the front, means releasably securing the front member of the angle iron frame to the top of the front member of the seat framework. the side and back members of the angle iron frame being spaced from the corresponding members of the seat framework, one side of the angle irons being substantially in a plane parallel to the plane of the seat frameworkand the other side at thereto and extending outwardly around the outer periphery of the frame, the bottom surface of the angle irons in the plane of the seat framework having downwardly directed protuberances formed thereon, spaced spring supports disposed between the side members of the angle iron frame, springs disposed on the supports and extending upwardly therefrom, a cover over the springs and angle iron frame removably secured by the protuberances, and spring tension means disposed between the side and back members of the angle iron frame and the corresponding members of the seat framework and between the angle iron frame of the remov able seat and the removable back for the back framework.

3. In a chair having upholstered arms and a rigid back and seat framework, the seat framework having spaced parallel front and back members and spaced parallel side members disposed intermediate the corresponding ends 0f the front and back members and the back frame-v work extending upwardly from the back member of the seat framework; the improvements comprising a removable upholstered seat for the seat framework in combination with a removable upholstered back for the back framework, the removable upholstered seat comprising spaced parallel front and back members and spaced parallel side members disposed intermediate the corresponding ends of the front and back members, said members having a length less than that of the corresponding members of the seat framework, spring tension means for removably securing the side members and the back member of the upholstered seat to the Vcorrespondini-r members of the seat framework with the front member of the upholstered seat superposed on and releasably secured to the front member of the seat` framework, means for removably seeming the upholstered back to the back framework intermediate the upholstered arms, and spring tension means for releasably securing the back member of the upholstered seat to the bottom of the upholstered back.

STANLEY J. KOSTROWSKI.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,159,477 Cutlip Nov. 9, 1915 1,203,051 Rockhoff Oct. 31, 1916 1,329,068 Young Jan. 27, 1920 1,925,480 Coxon Sept. 5, 1933 2,031,745 Stubnitz Feb. 25, 1936 2,101,124 Young Dec. 7, 1937 2,106,066 Sadgrove Jan. 18, 1938 2,133,747 Hunter Oct. 1S, 1938 2,266,896 Nordmark Dec. 23, 1941 2,318,583 Bernstein May 11, 1943 2,469,216 Spunt et al May 3, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1159477 *Oct 5, 1914Nov 9, 1915Charles T CutlipSpring structure.
US1203051 *Apr 28, 1916Oct 31, 1916Leonard A YoungBorder-strip for spring-cushions.
US1329068 *Sep 25, 1919Jan 27, 1920Leonard A YoungUpholstery-spring construction
US1925480 *Feb 24, 1932Sep 5, 1933Coxon Fred MChair frame
US2031745 *Jun 13, 1933Feb 25, 1936Fort Pitt Bedding CompanyCombination air and spring cushion seat and the like
US2101124 *Dec 13, 1935Dec 7, 1937Leonard A YoungSpring structure
US2106066 *Sep 22, 1936Jan 18, 1938Howard Sadgrove WilliamChair, settee, or like furniture
US2133747 *Sep 21, 1936Oct 18, 1938Hickory Chair Mfg CompanyResilient sagless support for upholstered furniture
US2266896 *Oct 3, 1938Dec 23, 1941American Seating CoChair seat
US2318583 *Aug 11, 1941May 11, 1943Bernstein Samuel SSuspension unit
US2469216 *Nov 9, 1946May 3, 1949Gen Motors CorpSuspension spring seat
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2794494 *Jun 21, 1954Jun 4, 1957Englander Co IncStructure for furniture and the like
US3628830 *Jan 10, 1969Dec 21, 1971Mitjans Jose FiguerasChair
US4201417 *Dec 18, 1978May 6, 1980Griffith Jeremy NDemountable seating furniture
US5768754 *Nov 8, 1996Jun 23, 1998Armstrong; Peter E.Fabric fastening kit
US6062642 *Apr 2, 1998May 16, 2000Volkswagen AgVehicle seat
US6375269 *Nov 25, 1998Apr 23, 2002Ts Tech Co., Ltd.Seat having seating face made of sheet resilient material
US6955402May 15, 2001Oct 18, 2005Herman Miller Inc.Office chair
US7607732 *Jun 22, 2007Oct 27, 2009B/E Aerospace, Inc.One-piece dress cover for aircraft seat
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/218.3, 297/452.5, 297/440.2, 297/452.59
International ClassificationA47C31/02, A47C31/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47C31/026
European ClassificationA47C31/02B