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Publication numberUS2608354 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 26, 1952
Filing dateApr 4, 1950
Priority dateDec 16, 1948
Publication numberUS 2608354 A, US 2608354A, US-A-2608354, US2608354 A, US2608354A
InventorsWhittaker Harold
Original AssigneeWhittaker Harold
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mechanism for winding textile threads or filaments onto flanged bobbins
US 2608354 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

g- 1952 H. WHITTAKER 2,603,354

MECHANISM FOR WINDING TEXTILE THREADS 0R FILAMENTS ONTO FLANGED BOBBINS Filed April 4,- 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 lg 12 v a ""1 Aug. 26, 1952 H wH AK R 2,608,354

MECHANISM FOR WINDING TEXTILE THREADS OR FILAMENTS ONTO FLANGED BOBBINS Filed April 4, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Aug. 26, 1952 wHn-TAKER 2,608,354

MECHANIS FOR WINDING TEXTILE THREADS OR FILAMENTS ONTO FLANGED BOBBINS Filed April 4, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 uaoaaeeo S E 2E4S Y /7 /Z PM w Patented Aug. 26, 1952 I I g 2,608,354 MECHANISM tron, WINDING TEXTILE THREADS? on FIIQAMENT'S: FLANGED' n BBINs HaroldWhittaken flhadderton, mama, England afi iueatitnap im, 1950, SerialNo. 153,815

r In Great Britain December 16, 1948 f This invention of improvements in traversing mechanism for winding machines for winding textile threads and filaments I relates to such traversing mechanisms in which the thread guide is traversed to and fro through the medium of a grooved cam and more particularly to traverse mechanisms for winding textile threads or filaments on to flanged bobbins.

A disadvantage experienced in winding on such bobbins is that, when a fixed traverse is used, if the bobbins are not accurately positioned relatively to the cam there is arisk that if the throw of the cam carries the "thread slightly past the end of the barrel of the bobbin the thread will build up on the package in a slight upward curve against the inner wall of the flange.

Further, when a fixed traverse is used,even when the bobbins are accurately positioned relatively to the cam, it is found that the thread tends to build up in a slight upward curve against the inner wall of eachfiang'e', due to a slight dwell of the thread during reversal of the traverse. In

such packages the parts adjacent the flanges are more tightly wound andhard thanthe rest of the package; these hard .portionsflead'to thread breakages during unwinding and uneven penetration duringiany subsequentdyeing orother wet finishingprocess. Alternatively, ifthe thread fails to reach .the end ofthe barrel there is a tendency for the pack; age to develop slightly rounded corners instead oflthe desirable square ends. In such circumstances it is found that the thread tends to slip over the rounded corners, and to become embedded between the package and the bobbin flange, and that these embedded threads tend to break during the subsequent unwinding operation.

The present invention overcomes the aforesaid disadvantages by providing traverse mechanism in which the throw ofthecam is regulatable to ensure that the thread is correctly, laid on the barrel of the bobbin from flange to flange. This is accomplished by continuously varying the points of reversal of the traverse adjacent the flanges so asto counteract the dwell of the thread at such points, thereby winding the thread at the same density in all parts of the package and achieving the desirable square ends.

Traversing mechanism according to the invention comprises in combination a casing, a shaft journalled on said casing, a toothed driving wheel fast on one projecting end of said shaft, a grooved cam splined on said shaft with freedom for slight sliding movement along the shaft alternately in 2 Claims (01. 242-43y I opposite directions; a spider secured on the cam shaft adjacent to the cam andhavingoppositely extending arms inthe formof stub shafts, bevel ear Wheels rotatably mounted on saidstub shafts in opposed directions each enmeshed with a fixed bevel wheel rigidly mounted on a flanged bush in said casing, eccentric sheaves respectively encasing the boss of the adjacent bevel gear wheel and each respectively embraced by the head of a connecting rod the opposite end of which is connected to the boss of the traverse cam.

In the operation of the traversing mechanism, the traverse cam is rotated by the cam shaft and carries the threaded guide towards one end of the bobbin, the spider also rotates, causing the rotatable bevel gear wheels enmeshed with the fixed bevel wheel to rotate and by means of the eccentric sheaves to move the connecting rods to transmit a slight endwise sliding movement, to the traverse cam and so to increase the traverse of the thread guide to ensure that the thread is correctly laid on the bobbin adjacent to the dense, a slight endwise sliding movement in the opposite direction being imparted to the traverse cam at the opposite end of the throw to ensure that the thread is correctly'laid' at that end f the bobbin, and the rotation of the bevel'gear wheelsbeing timed to synchronise withthe t'rav erse of the cam to ensurethat the slidingmove' inent ofthe traverse cam takes place alternately at opposite ends of the strokefofthe cam, whereby the thread is correctly laid at each end of the bobbin without risk of the thread piling up or alternatively causing rounded corners to be formed, except in a controlled manner.

Description will now be given of a practical embodiment ,of traversing mechanism according to the invention, reference being made to the accompanying drawings in which. the same refer,-

ence charactersindicate correspondingparts in the several figuresof thedrawings. Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, the mechanism includes a casing Ill in which is journalled a shaft H 'on one vprojecting endv of whichfis securedca toothed-driving-wheel I2; Splined on the shaft H is a grooved cam l3 adapted to have a slight sliding movement along the shaft H alternately in oppositedirections. Secured on the cam shaft ll adjacentwto the cam I3 is a spider I4 having oppositely extending arms in the form of stub shafts l5. Rotatably mounted on the stub shafts [5 in opposed directions are bevel gear wheels IE, IT, respectively, each enmeshed with a fixed bevel wheel l8 mounted on a flanged bush IS in the end wall The rotatable bevel gear wheels I6, I! are 1 held on the stub shafts I by discs 21secured.

to the ends of the stub shafts by bolts 28.

The operation of the traverse mechanism is as follows.

shaft I I and carries the thread guide, not shown,.

towards one end of the bobbin; the spider I4 The traverse cam I3 is rotated by;the...cam

The variations of the lengths of the traverse during the cycle of operations of the traverse mechanism is indicated by the lines T in Fig. 4. Y indicates the length of the bobbin between flanges.

With traverse mechanism as described, it is possible -to ensure that :thread-isrorrectly laid onthe-bobbin. adjacent to thecflangesat each end of the bobbin without risk of the thread "piling up or alternately causing rounded corners to beformed except in a controlled manner.

I claims;

'Iraversing; mechanism for winding machines for winding threads or filaments, having :in combination aLeasing, a shaft journalled in said casing,a toothed driving wheel fast on one projecting end of said shaft, a grooved traverse also rotates around the shaft II causing therotatable bevel gear wheels I6, I! enmeshed with the'fixed bevel-wheel. I8 to rotate and, .by "means otthe eccentric sheaves2l, 22 to move "the :con-. nectingirods 123, 24 to transmita slight endwise sliding; movement to the traverse cam 'I3 and so. to increase thev traverseof the. thread guide to ensure .that :the. .thread: is. correctly laid on the.-.=bobbin adjacentto the flange.

At the opposite end of the-throw of the. trav-q 'erse. -.cam I3 an .end'wise sliding movement. is imparted to the. traverse. cam to ensure that the thread is correctly laid. at .that endof .the bobbin;

The --rotation.of the...beve1 gear .wheels .16.. I1 is timed-to. synchronisewiththe traverse .of the cam.-I.3 .to..ensure that. the sliding movement. of the traverse loam .I3 takes place .alternately. at oppositeendsof the stroke of the cam...

.Thediagramlillustrated inFigs. 3 and 4 shows the .influenoeof the .eccentrics.-2l, 22011. the traverse .of'thecam l3 in achieving the. spread of .the turn-back. coilsbf thread .when-.winding onto. flanged bobbins.

For conveniencait will. be assumed that the cam..l3makes sevencomplete traverses in each cycle,. but it. is to be understood that the length of the cycle may be .varied to requirements by change. of thegear ratio.

.Referring; to..Figs. 3 ande, in which .Tindicates the threadfbeing Wound on a .fianged .bobbin,'the start of the cycle is indicated at S an'dthe end of the cycle at E, the numerals I to 'l'iriclusive each indicatingone complete revolue tion of the cam I3. The arrows in the circles in Fig. 3iridicate the positions of the eccentrics 22, 23 after. each half. I'EVOllltlOILOf the traverse cam I3.

'The throw. of the cam I3 isindi'cated 'at'X, represented by "the distance between the lines A A, Fig. 4,. whilst the distance between the lin'esB, B,',indicatesthe full traverse length of "thie -mechanism which is the displacement achieved by the combined action of the cam I3 and theeccentric sheaves 2 I, 22.

It 'wi llbe seen from the. diagram that forall practical purposes, this is the sum'of the throw of the cam I3 and twice the throw'of the eccentric sheaves 2|, 22.

Theextent of the spreading zone-Z at -the end of the traverse length is indicated by the distance between the'lines B and C, Fig; 4.-

cam splined on said shaft with freedom for slight sliding movement along the shaft alternately in opposite directions, a spider secured ontthe camshaft adjacent. to. the .cam. and having oppositely extending arms in theaformaof stub shafts,-=.be.vel gear .wheelsrotatably mounted on said stub -shaftsin opposed directions, each enmeshed. with. v.a.. fixed. bevel. wheel... rigidly mounted onaa flangedebushinmsaid casing, ..ec.-. centric. sheaves respectively embracing .theboss of the adjacent first mentioned .rotatablebevel gearwheel. and each respectively embraced by the. head of .a "connecting rod. the .opposite -end of which. is.pivotallyconnected .to...the. bossioi the traversecam.

2.- .Traversing mechanism as .claimediin vclaim .1 in .which as-thetraverse camis rotatedby the. cam .shaft .to ..carry the. thread guide .towards one. end .cf thebobbin the. spider is.also. rotated. causingthe. rotatable .Lbevel gear :wheels en meshed .withthe. .fixed bevel wheel to rotate and by means .of .the eccentric sheaves to .move the connecting rods to .transmita slight endwise sliding .movement tothe traverse .cam and so to increase .the traverse of. thethread guide, a slightendwise sliding movement in the. opposite direction .being... also .imparted to thetraversecam at "the opposite end 'of 'the .throw,. the-ro= tation of the bevel gear wheels being 'timed'to synchronize with .the traverse of the. camto ensure that the sliding'movement of the traverse .cam takes .place alternatelyyat opposite ends ofithe stroke of the cam, whereby the thread is correctly. laid 'onthe bobbin "right up to the;fiangeateach-end-of the bobbin without risk of the thread piling up or alternatively caus ing rounded corners to be formed except in a controlled-manner.

HAROLD REFERENCES CITED" The followingreierences-are of. record irithe file-of thispatent:

UNITED STATES: PATENTS 1 Number Name Date 1,357,434 Anderson Novc '2, 1920 1,760,850 Remington 'May"27'; 1930 1,981,712- Sipp Nov; 20,1934 2,433,304 Stream Dec. 23,1947

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1357434 *Apr 23, 1920Nov 2, 1920Varley Duple Magnet CompanyWinding-machine
US1760850 *Jan 21, 1928May 27, 1930James H BellVariable-speed gearing
US1981712 *Jan 31, 1934Nov 20, 1934Sipp Eastwood CorpWinding machine
US2433304 *Jan 20, 1945Dec 23, 1947Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpTraversing mechanism
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2634916 *Jul 5, 1949Apr 14, 1953Jr Walter P TaylorWinding
US2919868 *Nov 28, 1956Jan 5, 1960Western Electric CoStrand distributing apparatus
US2931595 *Nov 28, 1956Apr 5, 1960Western Electric CoApparatus for distributing strand material
US3402898 *May 6, 1965Sep 24, 1968Klinger Mfg CompanyMethod and apparatus for forming a package of yarn
US3625148 *Aug 25, 1969Dec 7, 1971Adamovske Strojirny NpDevice for axially moving fluid-distributing rollers
US3638872 *Mar 28, 1968Feb 1, 1972Du PontProcess for winding a yarn package
US4586679 *Feb 6, 1984May 6, 1986Toray Industries, Inc.Yarn package of carbon filament yarn
US4674694 *Feb 28, 1986Jun 23, 1987Toray Industries Inc.Yarn winding apparatus
DE4319391A1 *Jun 11, 1993Dec 15, 1994Rieter Ag MaschfMethod for winding a flax roving
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/477.2, 74/22.00R
International ClassificationB65H54/28
Cooperative ClassificationB65H54/2809, B65H2701/31
European ClassificationB65H54/28B2