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Publication numberUS2609818 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 9, 1952
Filing dateMay 3, 1949
Priority dateMay 3, 1949
Publication numberUS 2609818 A, US 2609818A, US-A-2609818, US2609818 A, US2609818A
InventorsParrine John J
Original AssigneeStrong Cobb & Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic injecting ampule
US 2609818 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2 SHEETSSHEET 1 Filed May 5, 1949 INVENTOR.

jdA/A/ f PAQ/Q/A/E v Sept. 9, 1952 J. J. PARRINE 2,609,318

AUTOMATIC INJECTING AMPULE Filed May 5, 1949 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 Patented Sept. 9, i952 AUTOMATIC INJECTING AMPULE John J. Parrine, Rocky River, Ohio, assignor. to Strong Cobb & Compan nlna,Cleveland, Ohio, acorporation of Delaware Application May a, 1949, Serial No. 91,115

This invention relates to a new and useful improved form of combination ampule in which a solution or suspension is freshly prepared therein just prior to injection thereof and is then automatically rexpelled into a patient through an associated hypodermic needle by gas pressure within-the new combination ampule. Due to the fact that many medicinal and therapeutic solutions or suspensions, particularly aqueous suspensions intended for intramuscular injection, are more efiective and reliable when freshly preparedor aresubject to a certain amount of deterioration due to aging, it is extremely desirablefto prepare afresh solution or suspension-from the ingredients or component partsthereof just prior to injection and under completelysterile conditions. At present thereis noconvenient or satisfactory device for accomplishing this result. While it is, possible to mix the ingredients in a container and then draw them into-a hypodermic syringe by retracting the plunger of such syringe, this is not a particularly desirable procedure and hence it is customary to provide the 'injectable solution or suspension in an already prepared condition either in a disposable *or partially disposable syringe or-ina container provided with a closure through which the needle of the hypodermic syringe can be plunged to withdrawa desired amount of the preparation, such container ordinarily having-therein a multiple dose so that several such measured-amounts can be withdrawn as required. "It is also known to prepare cartridges of such injectables which are sold under the trademark name Carpules.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide a simple andrelatively inexpensive disposablecombinedampule and syringe, hereinafter termed an automatic injecting ampule,-

in which the ingredients or components of the medicinal or therapeutic solution or suspension are separately maintainedunder sterile conditions with means for admixing them just prior to injection and then ejecting the freshly made solution or suspension through an operatively associated hypodermicneedle." v

Another object of the inventionresides in an automatic injecting ampule comprising a pair of aligned glass receptacles or containers, one

of which containsa solvent or a liquid medium under gas pressureand the other of which contains a solid powdered or crystalline material which is to be dissolved or suspended inthe liquid medium.

A further object of the invention resides in 17 Claims. (or. 128-216) the provision of" an automatic injecting ampule which includes a container for a liquidingredient or component,a container for a solid ingredient or component and a hypodermic needle arranged and maintained inalignment 'withthe said containers, said containers and hypodemicfineedle being normally out ofcommunication with one another but beingla dapted-to be placed in communication at will.

A stillfurther object of the invention resides in an automatic injecting ampule which includes a sealed ampule containing sterile water and gas under pressure, an ampule-like receptacle containing apenicillin or othertherapeutic salt or substance which is adapted to be admixed with the water in the ampule to produce an aqueous suspension of penicillin or the like, a hypodermic needle maintained in operative position and in alignment with the said ampule and ampule-like receptacle by means of flexible rubbertubing, both the ampule and the ampulelilie receptacle terminating inreduced frangible extensions, and a screening or filtering element intermediate the ampule and the ampule-like receptacle and intermediate the ampule-like receptacle and the hypodermic needle to prevent undesired particles, e. g., of glass, from being ejected into or through the hypodermic needle.

Other and further objects and advantages will be understood and appreciated by those skilled in this art or will be apparent or pointed out hereinafter. i

In the accompanying drawing, wherein like numerals designate corresponding parts through the various views: e Figure 1 is an exploded view illustrating the several parts of an automatic injecting ampule responding to the present invention;

Figure Zis an assembled view of the several parts shown in Figure [1, but with the flexible tubing shown in section to'illustrate the operative positions-of the parts when ready for use;

Figure 3 is a transverse sectional viewon a somewhat enlarged scale taken along the line 3-3 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 represents thecondition of the parts when the pressurized ampule has been ruptured and showing that the liquid within the ampule has been forced by the gas under pressure Withing'the ampule-like receptacle and Figure 5 is a view showing the condition of the parts after the ampule-like receptacle has been ruptured subsequent 'to'the insertion of the hypodermic needleinto a patient.

Byreference to the drawings, it will be observed that my new automatic injecting ampule includes a standard or conventional ampule I0, an ampule-like receptacle II and a hypodermic needle I2, together with lengths of flexible tubing I3 and I and a needle protective cap or guard I5. Ampule Ii! is of any suitable or usual construction and is ordinarily composed of a cylindrical body portion I 6 with a reduced frangible extension I! at one end thereof terminating in a sealed tip. In accordance with known practices, this ampule has sealed within it a sterile liquid which may be any suitable solvent or suspending medium but which in the instant case is pure sterile water. The reduced frangible extension I! is inserted within one end of the length of flexible tubing I3, as best shown in Figure 2, and this tubing is preferably of flexible rubber of either a natural or synthetic composition.

Into the other end of the length of flexible tubing I3 is inserted the open somewhat reduced end I8 of the ampule-like. receptacle 'II. This portion I8 preferablyterminates in a rounded lip or bead I9 which aids in holding the receptacle within the flexible rubber tubing and which further serves as a means'for positioning the circumferential'edge of the filtering or screening element 20, which may be made of any suitable material, such as a pre-shaped hemisphere of stainless steel fine'mesh screening, but which in the present instance is pre'ferably'composed of a textile material such as cotton or nylon of fine weave having extremely small interstices between the warp and Weft threads or filaments. When a hemispherical screen isemployed, it can be readily placed over the bead I9 prior to inserting the same within the tubing I3 and when a fabric is employed, such as is preferred, a small disk of such fabric is placed over the open end of the receptacle I I and tucked under the bead I9 prior to inserting the end of the receptacle I I into the flexible tubing. When the indicated members are within the length of tubing I3 they are in the relative positions clearly shown in Figure 2 and the terminus of the reduced frangible extension I1 of the ampule -I I] is directed toward and located close to the filtering or screening element and the open end I8 of the receptacle I i.

The ampule-like receptacle II has its central portion of cylindrical shape and its endopposite the open end I8 is constructed and sealed in ampule-fashion as shown and as indicated by the numeral H and is substantially the same as the portion I! of the ampule I0. Receptacle II contains the solid ingredient or component which is to be dissolved or suspended in the solvent or liquid in the ampule I0 and while this may be of any suitable or-desired medicinal, chemical or antibiotic substance, it is inthe present instance a finely powdered penicillin salt such as potassium or sodium penicillin. The amount of such penicillin salt is such that with the sterile water in ampule ID a predetermined dosage having a desired volume and potency will'be formed just prior to injection. The reduced frangible extension 2| of receptacle I I is inserted in one end of the flexible tubing I4 which is the same as tubing I3. Hypodermic needle I2 is any suitable, known or conventional hypodermic needle including a hollow hub 22 and a needle proper which terminates in a beveled point. Needle I2 and hub 22 provide a continuous passageway therethrough, as is well known.

A filtering or screening element 23 is placed over the end of the needle hub 22 which is inserted in the other end of the length of flexible tubing I4 as clearly shown in Figure 2. Screening element 23 is preferably a hemisphere of fine mesh stainless steel or other metallic woven screening, which is pre-shaped into hemispherical form so that it can be readily slipped over the end of hub 22 and will remain in proper position while the hub is being inserted into the flexible tubing M- As'is the case with frangible extension I1 and screening element 20, frangible extension 2I and screen element 23 are also in proximity within the flexible tubing I4 with the sealed terminus of the frangible extension 2I directed toward the passageway within the needle hub 22. The combination is completed by the tubular guard or cap member I5 which fits over hypodermic needle I2, as shown, to protect the needle against damage and to maintain the same in a sterile condition until the contents of the ampule are to be injected. The open end of the guard or cap I5 is inserted into and held within the lower end of the length of flexible tubing I4 (see Figure 2) I v It is understood, of course, that all the component parts of my automatic injecting ampule have been sterilized and are in a sterile condition as assembled and marketed and that sterilization just prior to use is thus rendered unnecessary. The individual component parts of the ampule as a whole lend themselves conveniently thereto and consequently my new automatic injecting ampule is free from contamination at all times subsequent to the sterilization of the individual and/0r assembled parts until injection has been completed. Due to the fact that the ampule Ill contains an inert and innocuous gas undersubstantial pressure, which is preferably nitrogen under a pressure of theorder of about two atmospheres, namely aboutthirty pounds per square inch, the flexible tubing is so selected and of such nature that it will readily withstand such pressures and is sufliciently impervious to prevent the escape of significant amounts of gas therethrough during use. However, it will be understood that the actual injecting time is so short, i. e. a matter of only a few seconds,'that these requirements for the flexible; tubing are in no way disadvantageous. The material of the tubing must, however, be sterilizable, without em brittlement, cracking or other forms of deterioration. I have found that so-called gum rubber is entirely suitable.

It is believed that the operation of my new automatic injecting ampule willbe understood from the construction thereof taken in conjunction with Figures 4 and 5 in particular, but this is effected in the following manner: After having sterilized, as by alcohol, the site at which the injection is to be made, the needle cap or guard I5 is removed and the hypodermic needle is immediately inserted into the patient at the prepared site. Holding the new ampule pencilfashion, the frangible extension I! of ampule Iii is ruptured by bending slightly the flexible tubing I3, whereupon the gas under pressure in the ampule I I] immediately forces the liquid contents of the ampule through the screening element 20 throughthe open end I8 of the container II into said container. If desired at this point, slight agitation can be carried out by manually jiggling the receptacle I I but ordinarily such'is not required, due to the gas pressure which effects immediate and complete solution or suspension, depending upon the specific character of the liquid and the solid components.

Having thus prepared a fresh solution or suspension. the frangible extension 2| of thereceptacle H'lSIlOW ruptured by bending slightly theflexible tubing 14, whereupon the prepared solution or suspension passes, under the urging of the gas pressure, through the screeningele ment 23 and through the hub 22 and needle l2 into the tissuesof the patient. ,Due tothe gas pressure within the system, the freshly prepared solution or'suspension is substantially completely forcedinto the patients tissues within a short period of time.

It should be noted, however, that inconnection with allintramuscularinjections, it is highly desirable and often required to make sure that the needle has not pierced-a blood vessel, 1. e. a vein or artery. Thus, it is important that aspiration take place before the frangible extension 2l is ruptured in order to determine whether the injectable preparation will go into the tissues and not into a blood vessel. This is H carried out by exerting lateral compression with the fingers upon that portion of the flexible tubing M which isbetween the screening element 23 and the terminus of frangible extension 2| and'then releasing such pressure, and repeating the same one or two times if necessary. If the end of the hypodermic needle is within a blood vessel, this will cause .a small amount of blood to be sucked up through the needle and hub so that it will appear in the lower end of the flexible tubing l4 andcan be readily noted by its characteristic appearance and coloration. If no such coloration appears, then frangible extension 2| can be ruptured and the injection made.- Should, however, the needle be in a blood vessel, it is withdrawn and inserted into a new site, which is again testedby aspiration in the same manner. After the injection has been completed, the needle is withdrawn and the entire device may then be discarded or disposed of. It is understood, of course, that if desired the needle and hub can be reclaimed by cleaning and sterilizing the same, although ordinarily this need not be done due to the relatively inexpensive nature thereof.

It is to be understood that the foregoing is presented as illustrative or exemplary and not as limitative or restrictive and that within the terms of the appended claims various additions, omissions, modifications and substitutions may be made without departing from the spirit or principle of the invention. In particular, I may utilize any desired liquid and solid constituents which are to be injected in solution or suspension form and I may substitute, for nitrogen, anyother acceptable gas such as H2 or 002 which is inert and innocuous with respect to the ingredients involved and the patients welfare.

What I claim is:

1. An automatic injecting ampule comprising a pair of aligned cylindrical chambers each of which has a reduced sealed frangible extension and one of which contains a liquid sealed therein under pressure, a hypodermic needle adjacent and in alignment with one of said chambers but normally out of communication therewith and flexible tubing for maintaining said chambers and said hypodermic needle in alignment and in operative relationship.

2. An automatic injectingampule comprising a sealed ampule having a reduced frangible extension, an ampule-like receptacle having an open end adjacent the terminus of the frangible extension of the said ampule and an opposite end provided with a reduced frangible sealed ex- .6 tension similar to-{that' on.;sai'd ampule, a hypodermic needle having; a hollow hub adjacent the terminus ofqthereduced frangible extension 01" said ampule-like receptacle, and a cap normally covering and protecting saijd hypodermic needle, said-ampule and ampule-like receptacle and the said hypodermic needle being maintained in alignment and; in operative association bymeans of flexible tubing connecting and holding the same.

3. -An automatic injecting ampule in accordance with claim 2 in, which communication is adapted-to be effected between said'ampule and said ampule-like receptacle and between said ampule-like receptacle and said hypodermic needle by the rupturing ofsaid frangible extensions;

4. An automatic injecting ampule in accordance with claim 2 in which said ampule and said ampule-like receptacle arecomposed of glass and in which a filtering element is provided between said ampule and saidampule-like receptacle and between saidampule-like receptacle and said hypodermic needle. to screen out glass and other solid particles.

5. An automatic-injecting ampule in accordance with claim 4 in which said first filtering element is afine woventextile material in the form of a disk of such material over the open end of said ampule-dike receptacle.

6. An automatic injecting ampule in accordance with claim e'inwhich said second filtering element'is 1a pre-shaped hemisphere of fine metallic screening disposed over the upper end of said needle hub.

7-. An automatic injecting ampule in accordance with claim 2' in which said ampule and said ampule-like receptacle contain substances which aretobe' admixed just prior to their passage to said hypodermic needle.

'8. An automatic injecting ampule in accord ancewith claim 2 in which said ampule contains a sterile liquid under gas pressure and said am pule-like receptacle contains a medicament or the like which is to be admixed with said. liquid.

9. Anautomatic injecting ampule in accordance with claim 8 in which said sterile liquid is water under pressureof an inert innocuous gas andwherein'said medicament or the like is powdered penicillin.

10. An automatic injecting ampule in accordance with claim 9 in which the inert innocuous gas is nitrogen under a pressure of approximately two atmospheres.

11.In an automatic injecting ampule of the character described, a sealed ampule containing sterile water and an inert, innocuous gas under pressure, an open-ended ampule-like receptacle containing a powdered therapeutic preparation, a filtering element over the open end of said ampule-like receptacle and a length of flexible, gasimpervious tubing connecting said ampule and ampule-like receptacle and maintaining the same in aligned, operative relationship, said ampule When broken discharging its contents of sterile water into said ampule-like receptacle under the action of said gas under pressure, whereby a freshly prepared injectable preparation is obpule when injection is to be made through an associable hypodermic needle comprising an ampule having a vehicle sealed therein under gas pressure, an ampule-like receptacle containing an active ingredient to be admixed with said vehicle and having an opening through which said vehicle and gas are adapted to be transferred upon rupture of said ampule and gas-tight flexible tubular means for holding said ampule and ampulelike receptaclein aligned gas-tight position with the ampule tip adjacent the opening of the ampule-like receptacle.

13. A combination ampule in which an injectable preparation is adapted to be made up under gas pressure which is subsequently utilized to eject such preparation from the combination ampule when injection is to be made through an associable hypodermic needle comprising an ampule having a vehicle sealed therein under gas pressure, an ampule-like receptacle containing an active ingredient to be admixed with said vehicle and having an opening through which said vehicle and gas are adapted to be transferred upon rupture of said ampule and gas-tight flexible tubular means for holding said ampule and one end of the ampule-like receptacle in aligned gas-tight position with the ampule tip adjacent the opening of the ampule-like receptacle, a hypodermic needle having its hub adjacent the other end of said ampule-like receptacle and gas-tight flexible tubular means for holding said ampule-like receptacle and said hypodermic needle in aligned, gas-tight operative association.

14. An automatic injecting ampule comprising a sealed ampule having a reduced frangible extension, an ampule-like receptacle having an open end adjacent the terminus of the frangible extension of the said ampule and an opposite end provided with a reduced frangible sealed'extension similar to that on said ampule,'a hypodermic needle having a hollow hub adjacent the terminus of the reduced frangible extension of said ampule-like receptacle, said ampule and ampule-like receptacle and the said hypodermic needle being maintained in alignment and in operative association by means of flexible tubing connecting and holding the same.

15. An automatic injecting device comprising a sealed ampule having an injectable liquid and a gas under pressure therein, an ampule-like receptaclecontaining an injectable powdered therapeutic agent therein and one endof which is open and in a position to receive the liquid and gas from the ampule upon rupture of the latter and the other end of which is reduced and sealed, a hypodermic needle disposed adjacent the sealed end of the ampule-like receptacle to receive the admixed gas, liquid and powder therefrom upon rupture of the reduced sealed end thereof and tubular means of flexible, substantially impervious material holding said ampule, ampule-like receptacle and hypodermic needle in alignment in the above relative positions while enabling rupturing when injection is to be made.

16. An automatic injecting device in accordance with claim 15 in which the tubular means is constituted of a pair of lengths of rubber tubing forming closed passageways from said ampule to said ampule-like receptacle and from said ampule-like receptacle to said hypodermic needle.

17. An automatic injecting ampule; which comprises a plurality of substances which are adapted to be admixed just prior to their injection, each such substance being disposed in a separate receptacle and normally out of contact with the substance in 'the other receptacle, and an associated hypodermic needle disposed contiguous to one such receptacle in a position to receive the admixed substances, said receptacles being arranged in tandem alignment and each being provided with a frangible extension adapted to be ruptured to effect communication of one receptacle with the other when the substances are to be admixed, one such substance being a liquid which is sealed in its receptacle together with an inert, innocuous gas under pressure, and flexible tube means impervious to the contents of the receptacles for'maintaining said receptacles in such relative positions and said hypodermic needle in tandem alignment with said receptacles.

JOHN J. PARRIN'E.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,592,632 Hahn July 13, 1926 1,658,720 Hein Feb. 7, 1928 1,674,927 Smith June 26, 1928 1,770,631 Smith July 15, 193-0 1,770,632 Smith July 15, 1930 1,929,616 Vopata Oct. 10, 1934 2,175,365 Safiir Oct. 10, 1939 2,176,042 Pittenger Oct. 10, 1939 2,445,477 Folkman July 20, 1948 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 3,934 Great Britain 1 Feb. 19, 1903 114,611 Austria Oct. 25, 1929 456,867 Germany Mar. 2, 1928

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2753866 *Jan 21, 1952Jul 10, 1956Koree Jean UCombined ampule and injection apparatus
US3939822 *Aug 14, 1974Feb 24, 1976Jack MarkowitzDisposable blood collection and filtering device
US4911692 *Jul 5, 1988Mar 27, 1990Martin James HSterile storage and mixing dispenser
US5393497 *Jan 24, 1994Feb 28, 1995Habley Medical Technology CorporationDevice for containing and opening a glass ampule and for transferring liquid within the ampule to a container
US6099532 *Jul 13, 1998Aug 8, 2000Howmedica Inc.Disposable monomer dispenser and vial breaker
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WO1994006690A1 *Sep 21, 1993Mar 31, 1994Habley Medical Technology CorporationDevice and method for containing an ampule and transferring liquid within the ampule to a container
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/148, 604/200
International ClassificationA61J1/06, A61J1/00, A61J1/20, A61J1/14
Cooperative ClassificationA61J1/2096, A61J2001/201, A61J1/2089, A61J1/065, A61J2001/2086
European ClassificationA61J1/20B, A61J1/20F