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Publication numberUS2609954 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 9, 1952
Filing dateFeb 2, 1949
Priority dateFeb 2, 1949
Publication numberUS 2609954 A, US 2609954A, US-A-2609954, US2609954 A, US2609954A
InventorsStorey Alvin B, Sutherland Frederick F
Original AssigneeCelanese Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Transport lift
US 2609954 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

INVENTOR. FREDEmcK F. SUTHERLAND 4 Sheets-Sheet l ALVlN a. STOREY.

ATTO R N EYE F. F. SUTHERLAND ET AL TRANSPORT LIFT Sept. 9, 1952 Filed Feb. 2, 1949 INVENTOR.

K F. SUTHERLAND.

4 Sheets-Sheet 2- FREDERkQ BY ALvm B. STOREX.

A T TO R N EYS Sept. 9, 1952 F. F. SUTHERLAND ET AL TRANSPORT LIFT Filed Feb. 2, 1949 Sept. 9, 1952 F.' F. SUTHERLAND ET AL 2,609,954

TRANSPORT LIFT Filed. Feb. 2, 1949 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 M v m Ts H mm w n 1. m A

ATJTO R N Evs Patented Sept. 9, 1952 TRANSPORT LIFT Frederick F. Sutherland and Alvin B. Storey; Cumberland, Md., assignors to Gelanese Corporation of America, a corporation of Delaware Application February 2, 1949, Serial No. 74,188

.6 Claims.

This invention relates to transport lifts, and relates more particularly to transport lifts adapted to permit the packages of yarn carried by a transport to be inspected without being removed from the transport.

Packages of yarn are normally moved from point to point in textile plants on transports comprising a framework mounted on wheels and provided with several rows of pins or spindles on each side thereof for receiving and supporting the packages of yarn. The usual inspection of the yarn packages before shipment is often effected while the packages are on the transport. However, since several of the rows of packages of yarn on a transport are below eye level, it has heretofore been customary, during this inspection, to remove the packages of yarn individually from the transport, examine them, and wrap them for shipment or return them to the transport. As is readily apparent, a large amount of labor is required to carry out an inspection in this manner, and the possibility is ever present that the yarn will be damaged by additional handling.

It is an important object of this invention to provide an apparatus which will permit of the inspection of the packages of yarn on a transport without the necessity of the manual handling of the yarn packages.

A further object of this invention is to provide a transport lift which will raise a transport so that the several rows of packages of yarn thereon are successively positioned at eye level and may be examined for defects without removing them from the transport or otherwise manually handling the same.

Other objects of this invention, together with certain details of construction and combinations of parts, will be apparent from the following detailed description and claims.

In accordance with our invention, we provide a transport lift which will raise a transport so that the several rows of packages of yarn thereon are successively at eye level. This permits the packages of yarn to be inspected for defects without being removed from the transport. After the transport has been raised to the maximum height required to inspect all the packages of yarn on one side thereof, it may be rotated through an angle of 180 degrees, permitting the packages of yarn on the other side thereof to be inspected as the transport descends.

A preferred embodiment of our invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing in which Fig. 1 is a front elevational view of a transport lift embodying our invention showing a transport in operative relation thereto,

Fig. 2 is a view in section, taken on line 22 in Fig. l in the direction of the arrows, showing the manner in which the base of the transport is positioned with respect to the transport lift,

Fig. 3is a front elevational view, on an enlarged scale, of the lifting assembly of the transport lift shown in Fig. 1,

Fig. 4 is a top plan view of the lifting assembly shown in Fig. 3, i

Fig. 5 is a view in section, on an enlarged scale, taken onthe line 5-5 in Fig. 4 in the direction of the arrows, showing the manner in which the lifting beams are fastened together,

Fig. 6 is an end elevational view of the lifting assembly shown in Fig. 3, and

Fig.7 is a wiring diagram of the control circuit of the transport lift.

Like reference numerals indicate like parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

Referring now to the drawings, and more particularly to Figs. 1 and 2 thereof, the reference numeral 1 l designates an overhead beam to which an electric hoist i2 is fastened by means of a bracket 13. The electric hoist I2 operates tackle l4 passing through a pulley block 1 5, which pulley block is secured to a lifting assembly. indicated generally by reference numeral [6. The lifting assembly 16 comprises equalizing rods ll to which is fastened an upper lifting beam indicated generally by reference numeral l8. A rotatable lower lifting beam, indicated generally by reference numeral I 9, is fastened to the upper lifting beam IB, and is provided at its ends with lifting hooks, indicated generally by reference numeral 2i.

The lifting assembly l6 may be raised and lowered as desired by operation of the electric hoist l2, and is guided during said motion by pipe rails 22 and 23 which pass through sleeves 24 and 25, respectively, fastened to the upper lifting beam [8. Adjustable stops 26 and 21 fastened to the pipe rails 22 and 23, respectively, limit the downward motion of the lifting assembly 16 to position the lifting hooks 2| properly with respect to a transport, indicated generally by reference numeral 28. As a safety measure, the upper lifting beam [8 carries a downwardly extending arm 2 9 which operates a limit switch 3| to cut off the power supply to the electric hoist [2 when the lifting assembly 16 has been lowered to the proper position.

The transport 28 comprises a base 32 mounted on casters 33, and tubular frame members 34 which are adapted to be engaged at their upper ends by the lifting hooks 21. Between the frame members 34 there are a number of shelves 35,-

transport 28 is moved under the lifting assem-.. bly [5, the rear corner of the base e2 will strike the guide 39 and direct said base into firm contact with the guides 31 and 38. The guide 37 is also provided with a flange ii extending at a slight angle with respect thereto, which serves 'to a guide the transport 28 into the opening between the guides 31 and 39 for the proper positioning of the transport with respect to the liftingassem bly l6.

Turning now to Figs. 3 to 5 of the drawings in which the construction of the lifting assembly I6 is shown in detail, it will'be seen that the equalizing bars H are fastened together at their upper end by means of a bolt 42; on the bolt 42 between the equalizing bars ll serve to center a sleeve 44 to which is secured a bolt 5 for fastening the lifting assembly it to the pulley block 15.

The upper lifting beam i8,.which comprises a 1 web 46 provided with flanges ii, is fastened be-.

tween the lower ends of the equalizing bars if by means of stub shafts 58 that are held in posi'-,

web 46 centrally of the ends of the upper liftingbeam It by means of screws 53. The lower lifting beam 59, which comprises a web 5eprovided with flanges 55, is mounted for rotation on the king pin 52, with the web 54 resting on a ball bearing 56 held in position by a nut 57!.

Stub shafts 58, to which the lifting hooks 2! are keyed", are journalled in plates 59 fastened to the flanges of the lower lifting beam l9. Axial motion of the shafts 58 is prevented by collars 6i and E2 fastened to said shafts adjacent the flanges 55 with set screws 83 andii i, respectively. The lifting'hooks 2| which are free to swing in a vertical arc are spring pressed downwardly by means of torsion springs that'en circle the shafts 58. One end of each of the torsion springs 65 is fastened to the web 55 with screws 66, and the other end thereof is held under tension by collars 6? that are adjustably fastened to'the shafts 58 with set screws 68. Air cushions 69 fastened to the collars 6! by bolts 70 and to the flanges 55 by bolts I! restrict the action of the torsion. springs 65 on the hooks 2i, permitting stronger and more positive spring with softer contact of said hooks on the transport frame 34.

Means are provided for holding the hooks 2! ina horizontal position, when they are raised, said means comprising rods 12 which engage lugs F3 on the collars 62. The rods :2 are slidably supported inbrackets l4 and 15, fastened to the flanges 55' of the lower lifting beam #9, and are spring pressed in the direction of the lugs '53 by means of helical springs it. The rods 72 move in the direction of the lugs 73 until collars if moun ed on said rods strike the brackets l5. A hand lever 18 mounted on the rod 72 is employed for manually withdrawing said rod from the lug l3, allowing; the torsion springs 65 to rotate the hooks Sleeves as mounted 4 2! to a vertical position in contact with the frame members 34 of the transport 23. When the hooks 22 are in contact with the frame members 34, the

switch operating fingers 78, whose function will be described in detail below, will be actuated.

To prevent inadvertent rotation of the lower lifting beam I9, a pull type solenoid 8: is mounted by means of a bracket. 82 on the web 56 of the upper lifting beam it. Plunger 83 of the solenoid 8! passes through an aperture 84 in the web 45 and engages an aperture 85 in the web 54 of the lower lifting beam it thus locking said beam in position. Straps 8 6 whose ends 31 are bent downwardly are mounted on the web 54 to raise the plunger 83 clear of said web when the lifting beams are rotated relative to each other and are approaching a parallel position. For smoother operation, the solenoid 81 is counterbalanced by 1 means of weights at fastened to the upper lifting beam 48. To prevent the operation of the electric hoist if when, the lifting beams 58 and I9 are not in parallelism, a pair of brushes 89 are slidably mounted in insulating bushings 55 which extend through the web 65 symmetrically of the king pin 52. The brushes 89 are pressed down, wardly by means of conducting springs 91 which are located in the bushings 9i and are held in position with fiber plugs 82. The springs ill bear against the heads of screws $33 that pass through the fiber plugs 92 permitting electrical contactto be established with the brushes 89. During the rotation of the lower lifting beam $3, the brushes S9 ride in a fiber ring 94. When the lifting beams 58 and is are brought into parallelism, the

.' brushes 8!; make contact with screws Q5 that extend through the web 54-, being insulated therefrom by means of fiber bushings 95.

In operating the transport lift for the examination of yarn packages, the lifting assembly is; is normally in its lowermost position at the start, with the upper lifting beam [8 resting on the stops 26 and 27 and with the safety switch 35 open. The lifting hooks iii to the operators right are raised until the lug 73 engages the rod 12 to hold said hooks in horizontal position. .A transport 28 having been moved under the lifting assembly l5, and directed into the desired posi-' tion by guides 31, 38 and 39, the handle 78 is operated todisengage the rod l2 from the lug l3 permitting the spring 65 to. rotate the hooks 2i into engagement with the frame members 34 of the transport. When the hooks 2| are properly engaged, the switch operating lingers i9 will close contacts 97 in the hooks '2! which are connected in series with each other. If, when the contacts 97' are all closed, the brushes 89 are in contact with the screws a current will flow from the lines 98 and 99 through a relay IE9 which will operate a solennoid iii! to close a switch iGZin line I63 to motor starter Hi4 connected to the electric hoist E2 in conventional manner; Simultaneously, a pilot light I55 will be energized indicating that the transport lift is ready for operation.

Push button switch I06 is then closed causing the motor starter N34 to operate the electric hoist l2 raising the transport 28. As the transport 28 moves upwardly, the operator inspects the packages of yarn carried by the pins .36 on each of of 180 degrees until the plunger 83 rides up the end 81 of the rod 86 and engages the aperture 85 on the opposite end of the lower lifting beam it. During the rotation of the transport 28, the brushes 89 will be out of contact with the screws 95 and it will be impossible to operate the electric hoist l2 until the lifting beams are again in parallelism. Push button switch I08 is then closed causing theniotor starter I04 to operate the electric hoist I2 to lower the transport 28. During this descent, the packages of yarn on the other side of the transport 28 are inspected. When the transport reaches the floor, the hooks 2| to the operators right are raised until the lug 13 engages th rod 72 to hold said hooks in horizontal position. At this point, the transport maybe removed from the transport lift and another inserted in its stead. The entire operating cycle is then repeated.

A push button switch I09 is provided in parallel with the solenoid operated switch I02 to permit the transport lift to be operated in the event of an emergency without a transport 28 in position on the hooks 2i, and with the lifting beams l8 and I9 not in parallelism.

It will be readily apparent that the transport lift of this invention permits of a large number of packages of yarn to be inspected in a short time with perfect safety, without undue handling of the same and with a minimum of labor.

It is to be understood that the foregoing detailed description is given merely by way of illustration and that many variations may be made therein without departing from the spirit ing beam, a rotatable lower lifting beam carried by said upper lifting beam, a plurality of lifting hooks mounted on said lower lifting beam, means, operative only when said upper and lower lifting beams are parallel to each other, for raising and lowering said lifting beams and automatically operating means for locking said lower lifting beam against rotation when in parallel relation to said upper lifting beam.

2. A transport lift comprising an upper lifting beam, a lower lifting beam rotatably suspended from said upper lifting beam, a plurality of lifting hooks mounted on said lower lifting beam, means, operative only when said upper and lower lifting beams are parallel to each other, for raising and lowering said lifting beams and automatically operating means for locking said lower lifting beam against rotation when in parallel relation to said upper lifting beam.

3. A transport lift comprising an upper lifting beam, 2. lower lifting beam rotatably suspended from said upper lifting beam, a plurality of lifting hooks mounted on said lower lifting beam, means, operative only when said upper and lower lifting beams are parallel to each other, for raising and lowering said lifting beams, automatically operating means for locking said lower lifting beam against rotation when in parallel relation to said upper lifting beam and means carried by said lifting hooks and operable by said transport for permitting the raising and lowering of said lifting beams only when said lifting hooks are in predetermined engagement with said transport.

4. A transport lift comprising an upper lifting beam, a lower lifting beam rotatably suspended from said upper lifting beam, a plurality of lifting hooks mounted on said lower lifting beam, means, operative only when said upper and lower lifting beams are parallel to each other, for raising and lowering said lifting beams, means carried by said lifting hooks and operable by said transport for permitting the raising and lowering of said lifting beams only when said lifting hooks are in predetermined engagement with said transport, spring means for urging said lifting hooks into operative position and manually operable means for holding said lifting hooks in inoperative position.

5. A transport lift comprising an upper lifting beam, a lower lifting beam rotatably suspended from said upper lifting beam, a plurality of lifting hooks mounted on said lower lifting beam, means, operative only when said upper and lower lifting beams are parallel to each other, for raising and lowering said lifting beams, automatically operating means for locking said lower lifting beam against rotation when in parallel re ation to said upper lifting beam, means carried by said lifting hooks and operable by said transport for permitting the raising and lowering of said lifting beams only when said lifting hooks are in predetermined engagement with said transport, spring means for urging said lifting hooks into operative position and manually operable means for holding said lifting hooks in inoperative position.

6. A transport lift comprising an upper lifting beam, a lower lifting beam rotatably suspended from said upper lifting beam, a plurality of lifting hooks mounted on said lower lifting beam, means, operative only when said upper and lower lifting beams are parallel to each other, for raising and lowering said lifting beams, automatically operating means for locking said lower lifting beam against rotation when in parallel relation to said upper lifting beam, means carried by said lifting hooks and operable by said transport for permitting the raising and lowering of said lifting beams only when said lifting hooks are in predetermined engagement with said transport, spring means for urging said lifting hooks into operative position, manually operable means for holding said lifting hooks in inoperative position and guide means for positioning said transport with respect to said lifting hooks.

FREDERICK F. SUTHERLAND. ALVIN B. STOREY.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 682,175 Condict Sept. 10, 1901 992,307 Weickel et al May 16, 1911 1,446,331 Brakeley Feb. 20, 1923 1,682,078 Hanlen Aug. 28, 1928 1,767,525 Hoffman June 24, 1930 1,834,499 Richter 1 Dec. 1, 1931 2,014,807 Keyzer Sept. 17, 19-35 2,247,144 Baldwin June 24, 1941

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US2718320 *Jun 22, 1950Sep 20, 1955Western Electric CoArticle-handling apparatus
US2718321 *Jun 22, 1950Sep 20, 1955Western Electric CoApparatus for handling articles
US2747755 *Feb 12, 1952May 29, 1956Kughler Edwin RDrum handling devices for lift trucks
US2757812 *Jun 11, 1951Aug 7, 1956Russell Kughler EdwinLift truck attachment for drums and the like
US2760662 *Jun 3, 1952Aug 28, 1956Russell Kughler EdwinBarrel handling device with gripping jaws
US2811267 *Feb 14, 1952Oct 29, 1957Magnaflux CorpFeeding mechanism control system
US2815547 *Jan 12, 1954Dec 10, 1957Greenlce Bros & CoCore box drawing apparatus
US2911115 *Sep 25, 1956Nov 3, 1959Jacobsen Jr EdwinStorage system and apparatus
US2912180 *Jun 26, 1956Nov 10, 1959Glenn A LindbergMachine for handling rolls of floor covering
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US3024919 *Jul 31, 1959Mar 13, 1962Nat Castings CoCargo container handling system
US3175719 *Apr 30, 1962Mar 30, 1965Bulldog Engineered Products CoDrum-handling apparatus
US4136789 *Mar 15, 1977Jan 30, 1979B.V. Koninklijke Maatschappij "De Schelde"Conveying, storage and sorting system for large metal sheets, particularly for use in shipbuilding
US4362292 *Mar 12, 1981Dec 7, 1982Rowan Donald JOverhead hoist assemblies
US4895101 *May 2, 1988Jan 23, 1990Schering AktiengesellschaftDevice for lowering and lifting supports holding objects to be coated with chemical substances in plating baths
US5472503 *Jun 25, 1993Dec 5, 1995Lico, Inc.Vertical load transferring apparatus
US5639197 *Sep 7, 1995Jun 17, 1997The Drum Runner Material Handling CompanyUniversal carrier with optional integral force measuring device
Classifications
U.S. Classification414/626, 414/618, 212/327, 294/106
International ClassificationB66C1/22
Cooperative ClassificationB66C1/22
European ClassificationB66C1/22