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Publication numberUS2610329 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 16, 1952
Filing dateJan 14, 1949
Priority dateJan 14, 1949
Publication numberUS 2610329 A, US 2610329A, US-A-2610329, US2610329 A, US2610329A
InventorsStrathaus John
Original AssigneeStrathaus John
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Convertible bed and davenport
US 2610329 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P 16, 1952 .1. STRATHAUS v CONVERTIBLE BED AND DAVENPORT 2 SI-IEETS-SI'IEET 1 Filed Jan. 14, 1949 INVENTOR.

nrmeA/Es JOHN 572/777-6005,

S p 16, 1952 J. ,STRATHAUS 2,610,329 CONVERTIBLE BED AND DAVENPORT 2 SHEETSSl-IEET 2 7 u, l. H m 1 u H mm W 7 V T H mm 7 m tmv t This invention relates Patented Sept. 16, 1952 sofas designed toconceal their alternative function as beds and inadequately adapted to be converted intobeds possessed of qualities of comfort. and convenience. For example, the seat of asofa of conventional width-that is,a sofa ,that properly supports the -back without; extending uncomfortably under theknees is slightly too nar- IOW I'QfbE' comfortable as a-single bed. A'sofa of such proportions may haveits backhinged to ef w e to e lanen th se mi t re a e bed b ton up nwh it s possible to tuck-sheets andblankets unless an extra mattress is provided, The arm-rests of a sofa. are usually low, and when used as head pieces for a bed,- they are not high enough to supporta stack of pillows behind a person wishingtositupinbed. V- It is accordingly a further objectofthis invention' to provide a sofa convertible into a bed of" a q at .W d h- Another object of theinvention is to provide asofa convertible in a bed which may be made upginthe ordinary way of tucking blankets and sheetsunder the edges of the mattress-gin this invention,; theseat of the sofa-instead of merely, drapingthemgver themattress with a hope that,

eyi il rn tslil 011 c, v; H 1

;Still another object of the invention ispto provide a sofa having conventionally -lowiarm-rrests which maybe convertedinto a'bedhaving relatively high head and footvpieceaj Yetanother object of the invention quickly ,converted into an attractive j davenport.

I fI'he invention possesses-other objects and teatures'of advantage, some of which, with the fore- Tl Applicatin January 14 w r Claims. (01. 5-.59)

s- PATENT- John Strathaus, San Fernando, Calif.

, 1949, Serial No. 70,857

2 Referring to the drawings: 1 Figure 1 is a perspective view of a convertible bed and davenport, embodying the principlespf this -invention,-showing the article of furniture made up asva davenport. r V

I Figure-2 is a;perspective view from thesame aspect; as Figure 1, showing the articleof furniture in a stage of conversion. j r v is to ipro-I vide a 'bedhavin fthe width,fcomfort,- and con-p veniences oi a standard single bed,-,which may be:

going, will be set, forth in the following descrip 'tion ofthepreferred-form of-my invention which is illustrated in the drawings accompanying and forming part of the specification. It is 'to be u'nin-Ithe: claims. I q

Figure 3 is a perspective view fromathe same aspects as Figures 1' and 2, showing ;the:article of furniture made up as a bed. a 11- Figure 4 is a vertical sectional.view-;on-an:en.- larged scale, taken on they line '4-14"of.rFigure;1i", with the direction of view. as indicatedshowing the'upholstery cushion of the davenport back in conventional position, and, in broken line, moved to a position permitting thedavenport to be con verted to a bed. i 1' Figure 5 is. a fragmentary'detail from: Figure '4, on a further enlarged scale, showing the method of attaching the back upholstery of the v davenport to the back support.

Figure 6 is another fragmentary sedtionalqdetail onlapproximately the scale of Figure15, and taken on the line 6-6 of Figure 4, with the direc tion of 'view as indicated, showing the means used to mount the back support of the davenport pivotally upon the arm-rests. 1 I v Figure '7 is a horizontal sectional view on the plane of section indicated by the line 1-4 of Figure 6, showing means for controlling the pivotal movement of the -davenport back support. Figure 8 is a vertical fragmentary: sectional detail on a further enlarged scale, taken onthe plane of section indicated by the line'8'-" -8lof Fig-" Having reference now to the details of-the drawings, #my improved convertible bed and davenport may comprise a main frame Ii supporting a seat mattres's' 'll and havingarm-restsi l3 at each end secured to the frame and forming" part thereof. -One or more of the arm-re'sts is may contatin a compartment i4, closable by 'a 'Ihe'frame H and the seat mattress l2 may have thew'idth of a standard single bed;

door I 5 and of coursethe length of theiseat 'mattress l-23 betweenth'e arm-rests I3 is ofsuitable' lengthf" for a bed.

Each of the arm-rests l3 haspivotally mountedthereon, as shown in detail in Figures 4.:to B,

a back support 11. The two back supportsii'l; are each substantially half the length-:of, the: seat mattress [2 so as to be adapted to be swun to each of the back supports I1, extending nori mally downwardly over the frontal face lfliof' the back support to substantial contiguity with the seat mattress l2 and forming a closure for the cabinet 28. The cushions 22 may besecured' to the back supports I! in any suitable manner permitting them to be swung upwardly, as shown in broken line in Figure 4, but preferably I employ a hinge connection, asshown in Figure 5,

which' permits the cushions 22 to be easily disengaged and removed from the back supports. Plates 23 are inserted in the upper panelling 25 of the back supports H; and haveslots"25 for receiving hooks lfisec'ured: to the rearward sides of the cushions 7,2. F The forward-imargins'21 0f the plates 23, definin'gthe'sl'ots 25 form adequate hinge bars'f'ror'n which the hooks. 26 may be easily disconnected V Y, Each of the back-supports -11 is pivotallybecured by a' 'bearingbracket. 25.! to a pivot post $0,:as:sliown-f in-"Figure 6, the post 39 extending downwardly into the arm-rest |3.:andi there being mounted in a bearing bracket 31'. 'AJcoHar-BZ on the post 3i!v provides; a suppcrtinglibearing for theback support ll, separatingthe lowersurface of the back support and theupper surface of arm-rest l3 sufficiently to permit swinging' 'the biackxsupport without friction on the arm-rest. rr' To limit the pivotarmovenrent cf'the back supportsfllfl to movement between the aligned positions above described invrhich' they form a sofazback, and positions in upward extension of the arm.-- .:ests I3, in which they form head and foot members for a bed, a plate 34 is secured to the lower surface of each back support and has an arcuater'slot 35 describing an'arcof substantially ninety degrees. A plate'tt secured to'theupper surface of thearm-rest 13 serves to locate apost 31, the upper'end of which is adaptedetor travel in thecslot 35. The post 31, accordingly, stops further pivotal; movement of: tlreback support-l 1: whenever either: end of the slot -35 comes into contact with-it. *W-henmy convertible v bed-and davenportis to; be used as a davenport, the back supports?" are; swung into alignment'abovethe rearward margin of the frame H and seat mattress l2, and ,the upholstery cushions 22 are allowed tohang naturally fromthe hinge bars 27,. as shown iii-Figural. The cushions 22'then cover the cabinets 20 and extend downwardly tothe seatmattress l2, and are projected forwardlywby the inclinedv faces I8 of the back supports ll, so as' to' reduce. the effective width of the seatmattress" l=2i-to a width appropriate for a davenport'seat; To convertthearticle of furniture toa bed, it is merely necessary to raise the cushions 22, as shown in Figure 2, so as to clear the arm-rests l3), and to swing the back supports IT to the positions shown in Figures, in upward extension of the arm rests. The cushions 22 are-then allowed to drop as closures to the cabinets 20.

4 In this position, the back supports I! form adequate head and foot members for a bed, permitting pillows tobe banked against either support in a manner comfortable to a person sitting up in bed. Blankets and sheets may be tucked between the seat mattress l3 and the frame H, as with an ordinary bed, as the seat mattress does not overhang the frame. The cabinets 20 are asreadily accessible as thecabinet [4, providing space for storing personal articles:

' I claim:

1. In an article of furniture convertible to either a bed or'a sofa, a frame, a seat mattress supported by said frame, end members rigid with said frame and spaced apart for the reception of said mattress extending lengthwise therebetween,;-the tops of said end members being higher than the upper surface of said mattress, a pair or back supports pivotally mounted at opposite ends of said frame and adjacent one side thereof and spaced vertically from said seat'mattiess by a distance at least'as great as the difference inheight between the tops ofsaid end members and the uppersurface of said mattress, said back member beingadaptedffor pivotal movement op: tionally'to aligned positions above said one side wherein said back supportsform-a virtually continuous back support'f'o'r a sofa or'oversaid end members t'opositionsremoved from above said mattressi and upholstery members supported by said back-supports and adapted to extendthere' from to said seat mattress when said 'baeksupports are'in 'said first-mentioned positions; 2. an article-of furniture convertible to either-a bed" or a'sofa, a frame, "arm-rests at opposite ends pf" said frame, extending thereabove, a pair of back supports-means pivotally supporting said back supports above the level of said arm-rests and adaptedto-permit said back supports to be" swung into positions of upward extension of said arm-rests and alternatively-into aligned positions above one side of said frame wherein said back supports form a virtually con tinuous back support extending lengthwise of said article between said arm-rests, and means movable with respect to said back supports for extending said virtually continuousback support downwardly substantially to said frame.

3. In an article of furniture convertible to either a bed or a sofa, a-frame, arm-rests at opposite ends of said frame, extending there above,'a pair of back supports, means pivotally supporting said back supports above the-level ofsaid arm restsandadapted to permit's'ai'd back supports to be swung-into positions of up},

ward extension of said arm-rests and'alternatively' into aligned-positions above one sideof said framewherein said'back supports 'form' a vir-i tually continuous back supportextendinglength wise of said article between said arm-rests, means for limiting pivotal movement of said backs'upports to movement between said first-mentioned and said last mention'ed positions; and means movablewith respect tdsaidi'back supports for extending said virtually continuous back support downwardly substantially to: said frame.-

i 4;:Inan4.article of: furriiture convertibleto' eitherwa bed oria sofa,- a frame, a seat mattresssupported by'said frame, arm-rests at opposite ends of said framefextendin'g thereabove, a pair of back 2 supports, means pivotally supporting said ba'cksupports above the levelrof said'arm} rests and adapted to permit said back'supports to be swung into positions of upward extension of said arm-rests and alternatively into aligned positions above one side of said frame wherein said back supports form a virtually continuous back support extending lengthwise of said article between said arm-rests, and upholstery members respective to each of said back supports and extending downwardly therefrom substantially to said seat mattress when said back supports are in said aligned positions, and being pivotally connected to said back supports so as to be raisable above said arm-rests when said back supports are moved toward said arm-rests.

5. In an article of furniture convertible to either a bed or a sofa, a frame, aseat mattress supported by said frame and having substantially the width of a single bed mattress, armrests at opposite ends of said frame, extending thereabove, a pair of back supports, means pivotally supporting said back supports above the level of said arm-rests and adapted to permit said back supports to be swung into positions of upward extension of said arm-rests and alternatively into aligned positions above one side of said frame wherein said back supports form a virtually continuous back support extending lengthwise of said article between said arm-rests, and upholstery members respective to each of said back supports and extending downwardly therefrom substantially to said seat mattress when said back supports are in said aligned positions and forwardly to reduce the effective width of said seat mattress to a width appropriate for a sofa seat, and being pivotally connected to said back supports so as to be raisable above said arm-rests when said back supports are moved toward said arm-rests.

JOHN STRATHAUS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

FOREIGN PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
CH112574A * Title not available
FR382733A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2679653 *Jan 11, 1950Jun 1, 1954Harvard Mfg CompanyDivan-bed
US3065020 *Sep 2, 1959Nov 20, 1962Cox Edward GConveyance seat with swing-away backrest
US3128123 *Apr 2, 1962Apr 7, 1964Fanghanel And Company Ltd PConvertible chairs
US3248742 *Nov 18, 1963May 3, 1966Kenneth Johnson JohnConvertible bed
US3419921 *May 12, 1966Jan 7, 1969Peter J. FloodBed headboard structure
US3639924 *Dec 29, 1969Feb 8, 1972Cadle Peggy SniderStackable furniture units
US5474377 *Sep 30, 1993Dec 12, 1995Cosco, Inc.Movable storage container
US5517706 *Dec 25, 1992May 21, 1996Kashima; HiroshiSofa-bed
US6811214 *Jan 12, 2001Nov 2, 2004Kevin M. WilliamsSofa lovers sofa
US7134727 *Sep 17, 2004Nov 14, 2006Kevin WilliamsSofa lovers' sofa
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/59.1
International ClassificationA47C17/00, A47C17/14
Cooperative ClassificationA47C17/16
European ClassificationA47C17/16