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Publication numberUS2611468 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 23, 1952
Filing dateNov 21, 1947
Priority dateNov 21, 1947
Publication numberUS 2611468 A, US 2611468A, US-A-2611468, US2611468 A, US2611468A
InventorsRockola David C
Original AssigneeRock Ola Mfg Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin chute mechanism
US 2611468 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 23, 1952 D. c. RocKoLA com CHUTE MECHANISM Filed Nov. 2,1, 1947 I N V E N TO R. C. Qockola I/ Patented Sept. 23, 1952 COIN CHUTE MECHANISM David C. Rockola, Chicago, Ill., assignor to Rock- Ola-Manufacturing Corporation, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application November 21, 1947, Serial No. 787,382

4 Claims.

This invention relates in general to coin handling devices, and more particularly to novel coin chute mechanism.

A principal object of the invention is the provision in a coin chute, having an aperture for receiving coins, of a novel closure member mounted interiorly of the coin chute and normally resiliently held in position to close the coin-receiving aperture so as to weather-seal the coin chute.

More specically, the closure member is provided with spring means for maintaining one surface thereof in engagement with that wall of the coin chute in which the coin-receiving aperture is located so as to underlie and close such aperture, the mounting of the closure member preferably comprising a pivot pin arranged in a slot in the member adjacent one end thereof, such slot being disposed normal to the wall engaging surface, with the spring means acting against that side of the member opposite its wall engaging surface in odset relationship to the pin and slot mounting of the closure member.

Another important object of the invention is to provide such a closure member in a coin chute which is movable out of aperture-closing position by a coin inserted through the coin-receiving aperture to further energize the spring means normally maintaining the member in aperture-closing position to cause such spring means to react against a coin so deposited in the chute to impart movement inducing energy thereto.

A further important object of the invention is the provision in a coin chute, having a wall with a coin-receiving the aperture therein, of means disposed within the chute for automatically imparting movement inducing energy in a direction along the wall containing the coin-receiving aperture to a coin inserted therethrough.

Another object of the inventions is to provide such coin-actuating means which automatically Awill impart different degrees of energy to differently sized coins directly proportional to the size of the coin deposited. I

`More specifically, the coin-actuating means comprises a member mounted within the coin chute adjacent the coin-receiving aperture for pivotal movement only by small size coins in-l inserted through the coin-receiving aperture to' further energize the spring means to a degree proportional to the size of the deposited coin, whereby movement inducing energy will beimparted to any deposited coin directly"prop'ortional to the size of the coin. Consequently, if the wall of the chute containing the coin-receiving aperture is disposed horizontally, for example.V all deposited coins will be impelled along 'the chute a predetermined distance, regardless1 of their size.

Numerous other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent as it is better understood from the following description, which, when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, discloses a preferred embodiment thereof. s

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a front elevational view, with-parts broken away, of a coin chute embodying the instant invention;

Fig. 2 is a bottom plan view of the mechanism shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a View similar to Fig. 1 showing'the coin chute disposed in a horizontal position, with the coin-receiving slot in the upper wall thereof; y 1

Fig. 4 is a top plan view ofthe mechanism shown in Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 1, showing, a dime being inserted through the coin-receiving aperture; and Y Figs. 6 and '7 are views similar to Fig. 5,1showing a penny and a nickeL, respectively, `being inserted in the coin-receiving aperture.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, reference numeral II indicatesl in general afcoin chute embodying the features of the invention and shown in Fig. 1 as mounted in avertical position and in Fig. 3 as mounted rin a horizontal position. The coin chute II Acomprises a casing herein illustrated as made up of a' channelshaped member I2 having side walls I3 and a top or end wall I4, each of which terminatesinan inwardly turned ange I5 disposedvin 4parallel relationship to the main body portion. of the member I2, anda front wall member I6 suitably retained between the flanges I5 and spacer members I'I (Fig. 2) As herein illustrated, 4the member I2v is of unitary constructionand the Afront wall member I6 is made of any suitable plastic or other transparent material. It will beunderstood, of course, that this casing construction may be modied-in any desired manner, and that the particular materials employed form no part of the present invention.

One of the side walls I 3 is provided adjacent the end wall I4 with a coin-receiving aperture or slot I8 of such dimensions as to permit passage therethrough and into the casing of the largest sized coin intended to be accommodated by the coin chute and the vmechanism (not shown) with which it is adapted to be empolyed. A pivot pin I9 secured in any suitable manner to the channel-shaped member I2 and extending normal to the rear Wall thereof, is disposed interiorly of the casing in spaced relationship to the apertured side wall I3 adjacent, thatV end of the coin slot I8 nearest the end wall. I4.

A closure and coin-actuating member 2l is mounted on the pivot pin. I9 for pivotal and translational movement relative thereto by means of a slot 22 engaging the pivot pin and arranged transversely of the member adjacent the upper end thereof. As illustrated herein, this closure member 2lisof sufiicient lengthl andy width as tounderlie andi completelyclose thecoin-receiving aperturey I8 when the outer side surface thereof engages the inner surface of the apertured sidewall I3, and the slot 22 is shown as formed by the inward and downward or reversev bending of a finger or extension 23 of such outer surface portion of the closure member which is formed integrally therewith. This reversely bent finger or extension 23 terminates ati apoint below or offset from the pivot pin I9 embraced thereby inv an angularly disposed tail piece 24 for a purpose to bev later more: ful-ly described.

Mounted. in parallel relationship to the pivot pin I9, is a spring-supporting pin 25 which, if desired, may comprise a screw extending through the: front wall member I6 and having threaded engagement at its rear endwith a suitable tapped bushing secured to the rear Wall portion of the channel-shaped memberv I2 so as to additionally function as a means for securing the front wall IG ofthe casing in place. A coil spring, indicated generally by reference numeral 26, is mounted on this pin 2'5 with one of its ends 21 being reversely bent, as best seen in Fig. 2, and engaging against the endwall I4 of the casing, and its other end 2t terminating in a transversely disposed portion engaging the inner surface of the nger or extensionV 23 of the closure member 2|. This end 28 of the spring 26 is so disposed with relation to the closure member 2| that it normally contacts the tail piece 24 of the finger 23, as illustrated in Figs. 1 and 3, to resiliently maintain the outer surface of the closure member 2I in firm contact with the inner surface of the apertured side Wall I3 of the casing. The closure member 2I thus functions to weather-seal the coin-receiving aperture I8=, the tail piece 24 functioning as a cam surface for cooperation with the end portion 28 of the spring 26 to insure complete surface engagement of the closure member with the apertured side wall I3 of the coin chute.

As will readily be appreciated, the pivot pin embracing slot 22 may be formed in the closure member ZI in any other desired manner, as by machining, and the cam-like tail piece 24 also may be formed as an integral extension of the inner surface of the member 2i. The important feature of the mechanism so far described resides in the pin and slot mounting of the member 2| interiorly of the coin chute, so that the spring 28, or any other suitable resilient means, may engage the member 2l at a point offset from the supporting pivot pin I9 so as to insure complete surface engagement between the closure member and the apertured wall of the coin chute. With this arrangement, any coin of suitable size may be inserted through the slot I8 and pressed inwardly against the closure member 2I to displace the latter against the action of the spring 23, in thev manner illustrated in Figs.v 5 to 7, to permit deposit of the coin in the coin chute II. Thereafter, the spring 2G will function to return the closure member 2I to its normal position of Figs.. l and 3.

In some types of coin controlled mechanism, the deposited coins function to release or actuate control or operation-initiating mechanism, and

the. weight of the smaller sized coins alone may be insufcient to insure such operation, even when the coin chute II is mounted in a vertical position as illustrated in Fig. 1. The instant mechanism obviates such difficulties by automaticallyl imparting, movement inducing energy tothe deposited coins. In other types of coin controlled mechanism with which the instant coin chute I I is adapted to beernployed, this same coin-actuating functionV may be used to move the deposited coins through the coin chute in an other than downward direction, or to insureV movement of deposited coins of different sizes in a substantially horizontal direction to a terminal delivery point horizontally spaced from the coinreceiving aperture I8'. The member 2| is adapted to impart energy from the spring 26 to the deposited coins directly proportional to the different sizes of such coins, in a manner to be fully escribed hereinafter, regardless of the difference in sizes of such deposited coins. The latter type of installation of the coin chute II is illustrated in Fig. 3.

The lower end of the coin-receiving aperture I8, or that remote from the pivot pin I9, is disposed in predetermined' spaced relationship relative to this pivot pin so as to accomplish the desired result of automatically imparting movement inducing energy in different degrees to differently sized coins directly proportional tothe different sizes' of the coins. For purposes of illustration, the instant coin slot I8 has been dimensioned to receive pennies, dimes and nickels. The width of the elongated closure member 2| the length of the slot 22 therein, and the position of the pivot pin I9 and the end of the coin-receiving aperture I8 remote therefrom are so disposed that insertion of a nickel through the aperture I8 will impart maximum movement to the closure member 2| from its normally closed position of Fig. l to the position shown in Fig. 7. On the other hand, with this same arrangement of the several parts, insertion of a dime into the coin chute against the action of the spring 26 will move the closure member 2I only as far as the position illustrated in Fig. 5. In other words, the spring 26 functions to resiliently maintain the inner end of the slot 22 in engagement with the pivot pin I9, and the several parts are so arranged that insertion of a dime into the coin chute through the aperture I8 will cause only pivotal movement of the closure member 2I about the pin I 9 to the position shown in Fig. 5, wherelin a dime is designated by reference character D, the spring 26 functioning to maintain the edge of the inserted coin in engagement with that end of the coin-receiving aperture I8 remote from'the pivot pin I9. Such pivotal movement of the elo-k sure member 2I energizes the spring 26 to a predetermined degree, the spring being tensioned by the resulting upward movementof its end 28 from 'the position of Fig. 1 to that o'f Fig. 5, and its other end 21 being maintained stationary against lthe end wall I4 of the casing. Consequently, upon Acompletion of the insertion of a dime into the coinchute, this predetermined amount o'f-energy thus stored in the spring 26 will be released to return the closure member 2| to its normal position of Fig. 1, and in so doing, the member 2| will impart movement inducing energy in the like amount tothe depositeddime;

With this same arrangement, insertion of a penny through the coin-receiving aperture Idil will first swing the closure member 2| inwardly againstthe action of the spring 2B, in the same manner as the insertion of a dime, and also, because of the larger size of the penny, will impart Aa small amount of translational movement to the member 2|, as permitted by the slot 22, to move the member 2| to its position of Fig. 6, wherein apenny is designated by reference character P. This incremental translational displacement of the member 2| will tension or energize the spring '218 to a further degree comprising an amount,

ladditional to that resulting from the insertion of a dime, which is proportional to the difference between the sizes of a dime and a penny. Consequently, complete insertion of a penny into the coin chute will result in movement inducing energy being imparted to the penny by the spring 25 and coin-actuating member 2| which is greater than that imparted to a dime inserted in the coin chute, with the difference between the amounts of energy applied to a dime anda penny being directly proportional to the diiference in sizes of these two coins.

As illustrated in Fig. .7, insertion of a nickel N ,through the coin-receiving aperture I8 williirst swing the closure memberZi about the .pivot pin I9 in the same manner as results from insertion of adime, and then will impart translational movement to the member 2| substantially to the extent limited by the slot 22. This translational movement of member 2| by the inserted nickel is in greater degree than that imparted thereto by a penny and in direct proportion to the difference in sizes between a nickel and a penny. Consequently, it will be seen that a greater actuating force will be imparted to a larger coin inserted in the coin-receiving aperture |8 than to a smaller coin, and the several partsherein described are so diinensioned that the difference betweenfthe amounts' of movement inducing energyl thus irnparted to' the differently siized coins are directly proportional to the difference between the diameters of the different coins.

If the coin chute is mounted in a horizontal position, or any position other than a vertical position, as illustrated in Fig. 3, the net result of the deposit of differently sized coins therein through the coin-receiving aperture I8 will be to move the deposited coins 'along the coin chute in the direction of the apertured side wall |3 to a predetermined point or for a definite distance, regardless of the differences in diameter of the coins. When the coin chute is mounted in a vertical position as shown in Fig. 1, coins inserted through the slot I8 will, of course, drop through the casing of the coin chute in response to gravity, but since the spring 26 retains the closure and coin-actuating member 2| in contact with any deposited coin throughout the movement of such coin through the aperture I8, the energy-imparting function of the member 2| will be performed in the same manner as though the coin chute l were disposed 6. in an other than vertical position, and the deA posited coins will have movement inducing en-` ergy imparted thereto in a downward direction irr. varying degrees proportional to their different di-f ameters. This is of material importance in some types of coin controlled mechanism, since' it in-' sures coin actuated control mechanism being op erated by the lighter weight or smaller coins asi well as by the larger ones. The instant mecha--y nism also has the distinct advantage of being adaptable to mounting in a horizontal position,. either as shown in Fig. 3 or in the reverse thereof' with the apertured wall |3forming thev bottom. Wall of the casing, so that any coin inserted,I through the aperture I8 automatically will be im pelled through the coin chute in .the direction of the apertured wall. At the same time, the mem ber 2| functions to perfectly weather-seal the coin-receiving aperture I8, so that the use of the instant coin chute in conjunction with outdoor installations, such as parking meters for exam-a ple, will completely prevent water leakage. into the operating portion of the mechanism through the coin-receiving aperture. At the'same time, if sleet or ice should form over the .coin-receiving; aperture under such conditions, there is nothing to prevent anyone from inserting a coin into'the coin chute merely by the application of pressure against the coin in suicient degree to break through any film of ice so formed. It will be understood, of course, that resilient means differ;l ent from the spring 25 herein illustrated maybe employed to retain the closure member 2| in normal closing position, and it is not intended to limit the present invention to any particular shape, configuration or size of the coin chute. It is thought that the invention and many of its attendant advantages will be understood from the foregoing description, and it will be apparent that various changes may be made inthe form, construction and arrangement of the parts without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention or sacrificing all of its material advanl tages, the form hereinbefore described being merely a preferred embodiment thereof. I claim: y -f 1. A coin chute, comprising a casing Ahaving arcoin-receiving aperture in one wall thereof, a pivot pin mounted interiorly of said casing fadjacent one end of said aperture, a member 'hav'-y ing'a slot engaging said pin,v said slot normally being disposed substantially normal to said apertured Wall, and a spring mounted interiorly-Lof said casing and engaging said member to normally maintain the outer surface thereof vin clos# ing relationship to said aperture, said pivot pin normally engaging the inner end of said slot, the other end of said aperture remote from said pivot pin being disposed at a predetermined distance therefrom equal to the maximum diameter of a desired small size coin plus the distance from said outer surface of said member to the inner end of said slot less the diameter of said pin, so that small size coins not larger than said maximum diameter inserted throughsaid aperture will cause only pivotal movement of said member about said pin, and larger size coins of greater than said maximum diameter inserted through said aperture will also cause translational displacement of said member relative to said pin as permitted by the length of said slot. 2. A coin chute, comprising a casing having a coin-receiving aperture in one wall thereof, a pivot pin mounted interiorly of said casing adjacent one end of said aperture, a member havinc' 'a 'slot engaging said pin. said-slot normally being disposed substantially normal to said @perf turad Wall, and a spring mounted intcriorly of said casing and engaging said member tonormally maintain the same in closing relationship to said aperture, said pivot pin normally engaging the inner end of said slot, the other end of said aperture remote from said pivot pin being disposed at a predetermined distance therefrom so that small size coins inserted through said aperture will cause only pivotal movement of said member about said pin and larger size coins inserted through said aperture also will cause translational displacement of said member relativeto said pin as permitted by said Slot, the straight line distance from said pivot pin to the end of said aperture remote therefrom being substantially equal to the diameter of the largest 'coin insertable through said aperture plus the distance from the outer end of said slot to the outer surface of said member, and said slot being substantially equal in length to the diameter of said pin plus the difference between the diam.- eters of the largest and the smallest coins insertable through said aperture,

3. A coin chute, comprising a casing having a coinqeceiving aperture in one wall thereof, a pivot pin mounted interiorly of said casing adjacent one end of said aperture, a member having a slot engaging said pin, said slot normally being disposed substantially normal to said apertured wall, and a spring mounted interiorly of said casing and engaging said member to normally maintain the outer surface thereof in closing relationship to said aperture, said pivot pin normally engaging the inner end of said slot, the other end of said aperture remote from said pivot pin being disposed at a predetermined distance therefrom equal to the maximum diameter of a desired small size coin plus the distance from said outer surface of said member to the inner end of said slot less the diameter of said pin, so that small size coins not larger than said maximum diameter inserted through said aperture will cause only pivotal movement of said member about said pin, and larger size coins of greater than said maximum diameter inserted through said aperture also will cause translational displacement of said member relative to said pin as permitted by the length of said slot, said spring engaging said member at a point offset from said pin, whereby pivotal movement of said member resulting from insertion of a smaller coin through said aperture will tension said spring a predetermined amount and the additional translational movement of said member resulting from insertion of a. larger-coin through said aperture will tension said spring an additional predetermined amount proportional to the dinerence between the diameters of said smaller and larger coins. said spring thereby being adapted to impart different amounts of energy to said member corresponding to the diameters of the different coins inserted through said aperture to cause said member in turn to impart such energy to said coins.

4. A coin chute, comprising a casing having a coin-receiving aperture in one wall thereof, a pvot pin mounted within said casing adjacent one end of said aperture, an aperture-closing and coin-actuating member mounted interior-1y or said casing and having a slot engaging said pin, a shaft mounted interiorly of said casing 1n parallel relationship to said pin, and a Spring mounted on said shaft and engaging said casing at one end, the other end of said spring engaging said member in offset relationship to said pin to normally maintain the outer surface of said member in aperture-closing engagement with said wall, said pivot pin normally engaging the f inner end of said slot, the other end of said aperture remote from said pvot pin being disposed at a predetermined distance therefrom equal to the maximum diameter of a selected small size coin plus the distance from said outer surface of said member to the inner end of said slot less the diameter of said pin, whereby insertion of a said small size coin through said aperture will pivotally move said member to an aperture-clearing position to tension said spring a predetermined amount to enable said spring to cause said member to impel such inserted coin along the chute, and insertion of a larger coin will impart the same pivotal movement to said member and an additional translational movement permitted by the length of said slot to tension said spring an additional amount proportional to the difference between the diameters of said smaller and larger coins.

DAVID C. ROCKOLA.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 461,461 Whiteside r oct. zo, 1891 2,197,086 Toce et al i.- Apr. 16, 1940 2,370,480 Moos Feb. 27, 1945 2,400,756 Herschede et al. May 21, 1946

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US461461 *Oct 20, 1891 whitesidb
US2197086 *Aug 14, 1937Apr 16, 1940Internat Vehicular Parking LtdCoin handling device
US2370480 *Jun 19, 1942Feb 27, 1945Landis & Gyr AgPrepayment meter
US2400756 *Jun 16, 1942May 21, 1946Internat Vehicular Parking LtdParking meter and coin slot therefor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3181781 *May 10, 1963May 4, 1965RandallIncentive savings bank
US5139128 *Mar 27, 1990Aug 18, 1992Ducan Industries Parking Control Corp.Chute for controlling the motion of a token moving by gravity through a token-receiving device
WO1991015001A1 *Mar 27, 1991Oct 3, 1991Duncan Ind Parking Control SysChute for controlling the motion of a token moving by gravity through a token-receiving device
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/342, 194/351, 194/344, 232/44
International ClassificationG07F1/04, G07F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07F1/045
European ClassificationG07F1/04B4