Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2611495 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 23, 1952
Filing dateApr 27, 1951
Priority dateApr 27, 1951
Publication numberUS 2611495 A, US 2611495A, US-A-2611495, US2611495 A, US2611495A
InventorsCritz Weaver James
Original AssigneeCritz Weaver James
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Barrel stacking device
US 2611495 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 23, 1952 J. WEAVER 2,611,495

BARREL STACKING DEVICE Filed April 27, 1951 E 2 SHEETS-SHEET 1 INVENTOR ATTORNEY Sept. 23, 1952 J. c. WEAVER 2,611,495

BARREL STACKING DEVICE Filed Apfil 27, 195 ZSHEETS-SHEET 2 BY j aam ATTORNEY Patented Sept. 23, 1952 TENT oF FIcr.

BARREL STACKING DEVICE James Critz Weaver, Richmond, Va. Application April 27, 1951, Serial No. 223,358

This invention relates to the stacking of barrels and the like, more particularly to a device for use in stacking tobacco hogsheads so as to facilitate the transportation thereof.

More specific objects of the invention are to provide means including readily removable Claims. 01. 21.4-10.5

chocks or braces for maintaining a plurality of hogsheads in stacked superposed relation on a truck so that a relatively large load can be arranged in a relatively small space; so that relative shifting of the hogsheads with respect to each other and to th truck will be prevented; so that the hogsheads can be unloaded with facility when desired; and so that the problem of returning the equipment for reuse at the same starting point will be reduced to a minimum.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. l is an end elevation of two superposed tiers of barrels arranged in a row extending transversely of a truck and showing a stacking devicein accordance with this invention applied thereto.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary perspective disassembled view of the stacking device.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevation of the stacking device.

Fig. 4 is a top plan of the structure shown in Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a vertical section taken on the line indicated at 55 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged end elevation of the stacking device.

Referring to the drawing in detail, the numeral l indicates the bed of a truck having suitably secured abutment rails 2 extending along the sides and throughout the length thereof. Mounted on the truck i are a plurality of barrels 3 arranged in a row extending transversely of the truck and consisting of upper and lower superposed tiers i and 5 respectively. A fully loaded truck would comprise additional similarly constituted and arranged rows so as to utilize fully the usable length of the truck.

Disposed between the tiers 4 and 5 is a stacking device in accordance with this invention and including a flat bar or board 6. Located at each end of the board 6 are a pair of plates 1 and 8 secured to the upper and lower faces respectively of the board. Th plates 1 and 8 are of greater width than the board and side edge portions thereof project beyond the side edges of the board as indicated at 9.

slidably mounted on each of the plates 1 is a chock it! which is removably secured to the plate by straps l l countersunk in the lower face thereof and having U-bent end portions l2, each receiving a projecting edge portion 9 therein. Projecting from a recess iii in the chock I0 is a pivotally mounted spring pressed pawl M for engagement with a row of apertures l5 through the plate 7. By way of example, the pawl is shown mounted intermediate its ends on a pin or bolt 20 extending transversely of and entirely through the chock, with a spring 2| bearing against the inner end of the pawl so as to bias the outer end thereof toward the apertured plate.

An identical chock l6, disposed upside down with respect to the chock "his slidably secured to the plates, which also is provided with a row of apertures l5. Permanently secured to the lower face of the boardflB, midway the length thereof, is a substantially triangular spreader I! for engagement with the barrels 3 of the lower tier 5.

Supported on the bed I, between each rail 2 and the adjacent barrel 3, is a plate [8 similar in every respect to the plates 1 and 8 except the plates 18 are slightly shorter. Each plate l8 abuts a rail 2, and seated on each plate [8 is a chock I9 similar to and functioning in the same manner as the chocks ID, being held against the barrels in the tier 5 by the engagement of pawls 23 with the apertured plates i8. Preferably the chocks i9 are slidably secured to the plates 18 by means of straps 22 similar in every respect to the straps H, and the plates I8 are secured v to relatively short and thin boards 24. Preferably the plates I8, I and Bare provided at their inner ends with stops 25 for cooperation with the'associated pawls and apertures to maintain the chocks and plates in assembled relation when not in use.

Conveniently, the boards '6 and 24, spreader I1 and chocks ii], iii and I9 may be formed of solid wood, with the plates, pawls and securing straps formed of metal, although the material employed is unimportant so long as it possesses the required strengthwithout unnecessary weight.

In use, a tier of barrels such as 5 is loaded on a truck, and a board 6 carrying lower chocks l6 and the chocks I slid into place and adjusted to hold the individual barrels of the tier in engagement with each other midway between the planes of the rails 2. Owing to the slight spacing of the barrels in the lower tier, the mutually engaging barrels of the upper tier will .be disposed with their centers of gravity slightly inward of the centers of gravity of the barrels in the lower tier to reduce any tendency of side sway of the upper tier or of the two tiers as a unit, thereby tending to stabilize the load. Additional rows of upper and lower tiers may be loaded in the same manner.

When it is desired to unload the barrels, the chocks III are removed after disengaging their pawls [4 from the plates 1. In the event of any binding of the pawls, this maybe relieved by applying a leverage tool, such as a crowbar, to one of the barrels, and if necessary. a suitable tool may be inserted under the pawl to aid in disengaging it from the plate. As soon as the chocks I0 have been removed, the upper tier barrels may be rolled or lifted off, and the board 6 with chocks l6 removed, after which the chocks I9 may be removed in the same manner as the chocks l0, permitting removal of the barrels in the lower tier.

Due to their relatively small size and compact nature, the idle stacking elements can be stored beneath the bed or in other unused space for return to the loading point or until again needed.

I claim:

1. A stacking apparatus for maintaining superposed upper and lower tiers of barrels in a transverse row on a truck .provided with abutment rails comprising, apertured plates seated on the truck bed in contact with the rails, chocks slidably mounted on the plates and having pawls for engagement therewith to hold the chocks against the lower tier barrels, a board extending transversely of the truck between the upper and lower tiers of barrels, a centrally located spreader depending from the board between adjacent barrels of the lower tier to hold them slightly apart, apertured plates on the upper and lower faces of the board at both ends thereof and having marginal portions projecting beyond the .side edges of the board, upper and lower chocks having straps'with end portions slidably securing them to said marginal portions, and pawls on said upper and lower chocks for engagement with the apertured'plates on the board to 'hold the upper tier barrels against each other and the lower tier barrels against the spreader.

2. A stacking apparatus for maintaining super posed upper and lower tiers of barrelsin a transverse row on a truck provided with abutment rails comprising, plates seated on the truck bed in contact with the rails, chocks slidablymounted on the plates, said chocks and plates having coacting means to hold the chocks against the 'lower tier barrels, a board extending transversely of the truck between the upper and lower tiers of barrels and having a centrally located spreader depending therefrom, plates on the upper and lower faces of the board at both ends thereof and having marginal portions projecting beyond the side edges of the board, and upper and lower chocks having straps with end portions slidably securing them to said marginal portions, said upper and lower chocks and plates connected therewith having coacting means to hold the upper tier barrels against each other and the lower tier barrels against the spreader.

3. A stacking device for maintaining upper and lower tiers of barrels in superposed relation comprising, a board extending transversely of the barrels between the upper and lower tiers thereof, a centrally located spreader depending from the board between adjacent barrels of the lower tier, apertured plates on the upper and lower faces of the board at both ends thereof and havin marginal portions projecting beyond the side edges of the board, upper and lower chocks having straps with end portions slidably securing them to said marginal portions, and pawls on the chocks for engagement with the apertured plates to hold the barrels of the upper tier against each other and the barrels of the lower tier against the spreader.

4. A stacking device for maintaining upper and lower'tiers of barrels-in superposedrelation comprising, a board extending transversely of the barrels between the upper and lower tiers thereof and having a centrally located spreader depending therefrom, plates on the upper and lower faces of the board at both end thereof and having marginal portions projecting beyond the side edges of the board, and upper and lower chocks having straps with end portions slidably securing them to said marginal portions, said chocks and plates having coacting means for holding the barrels of the upper tier against each other and barrels of the lower tier against the spreader.

1 5. A stacking device for maintaining upper and lower tiers of barrels in superposed relation comprising, a board extending transversely of the barrels between the upper and lower tiers thereof, plates on the upper and lower faces of the board at both ends thereof and having marginal portions projecting beyond the side edges of the board, and upper and lower chocks having straps with end portions slidably securing them to said marginal portions, said chocks and plates having coacting means to hold the chocks against the upper and lower tiers of barrels to prevent lateral displacement thereof.

JAMES CRITZ WEAVER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNIT-ED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 458,515 Boyle Aug. 25, 1891 1,298,578 Schneider Mar. 25, 1919 2,144,600 Koonce Jan. 17, 1939

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US458515 *Apr 16, 1891Aug 25, 1891 Means for piling up tierces
US1298578 *Feb 10, 1919Mar 25, 1919Schneider & CieGin for mounting and dismounting the carriages of guns of large caliber.
US2144600 *Nov 3, 1938Jan 17, 1939Richard S KoonceMethod of and apparatus for loading heavy spools
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2743823 *Apr 8, 1953May 1, 1956Breedlove James PAutomatic racking device
US3019916 *May 9, 1958Feb 6, 1962Republic Steel CorpPortable drum rack
US3091348 *Nov 14, 1960May 28, 1963Reynolds Metals CoRoll stacking device
US3202111 *Jul 3, 1962Aug 24, 1965Evans Prod CoFreight bracing apparatus
US3229825 *Mar 6, 1964Jan 18, 1966Brown Jr John RHogshead cradle
US3595176 *Apr 10, 1969Jul 27, 1971Portec IncAdjustable automobile frame loading system
US3611948 *Oct 27, 1969Oct 12, 1971Portec IncAdjustable harness for auto frame car
US3734281 *Dec 15, 1971May 22, 1973Armstrong JPipe pallet
US4190165 *Dec 27, 1977Feb 26, 1980The Mt. Pitt CompanyPipe chock stick
US4432526 *Jan 4, 1982Feb 21, 1984L. Andrew Withers, Jr.Support block assembly
US4572716 *Dec 17, 1984Feb 25, 1986The Mead CorporationPaperboard shipping chock and assembly
US4596506 *Feb 16, 1983Jun 24, 1986Mcdonnell Douglas CorporationAir bearing wheel lift
US4685846 *Mar 6, 1986Aug 11, 1987Golay Kenneth WCylinder transporting stabilizer
US4729537 *Dec 16, 1986Mar 8, 1988Turner Jack FPipe-chock
US5425608 *Sep 29, 1994Jun 20, 1995Reitnouer, Inc.Coil rack for flatbed trailer
US5476348 *Aug 16, 1993Dec 19, 1995Shelleby; Frank J.In a transport vehicle
US5755541 *May 3, 1996May 26, 1998Inter-American Vanguard CorporationDrum transport support system
US7458553 *Sep 4, 2003Dec 2, 2008Tama Plastic IndustryRoll stock cradle structure
US8011865Apr 7, 2008Sep 6, 2011Standard Car Truck CompanyRailroad car coil restraint system
US8033768Oct 21, 2008Oct 11, 2011Standard Car Truck CompanyRailroad car coil restraint system
US8057139Jan 21, 2009Nov 15, 2011Federal Signal CorporationTube restraint and methods
US8251622Oct 18, 2011Aug 28, 2012Federal Signal CorporationTube restraint and methods
US8277155Jul 29, 2011Oct 2, 2012Standard Car Truck CompanyRailroad car coil restraint system
US8308409Sep 8, 2011Nov 13, 2012Standard Car Truck CompanyRailroad car coil restraint system
EP2399843A1 *Jun 21, 2011Dec 28, 2011Sonoco Development, Inc.Transport element and set for securing load objects
WO1983002492A1 *Dec 30, 1982Jul 21, 1983Withers Jr L AndrewSupport block assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification410/42, 248/146, 410/49
International ClassificationB65D71/00, B65D85/20, B65D71/70
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/20, B65D71/70
European ClassificationB65D71/70