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Publication numberUS2612404 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 30, 1952
Filing dateSep 20, 1949
Priority dateSep 21, 1948
Publication numberUS 2612404 A, US 2612404A, US-A-2612404, US2612404 A, US2612404A
InventorsOlle Andersson John
Original AssigneeOlle Andersson John
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paint spraying device
US 2612404 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Sept. 30, 1952 PATENT OFFICE PAINTSPRAYING DEVICE John Olle' Andersson, Ektorp, Sweden The present invention refers to paint spraying devices of the type comprising a holder provided with a handle andadapted as a carrierofthe paint and air nozzles, a paint valve, a valve operating member arranged on said handle, and members arranged on vthe nozzle holder and adapted to'actuate the valve. The objectof the invention :isto provide a simple and inexpensive construction of a paintv spraying device of the type in consideration adapted to be coupled to a vacuum cleaner operating as an air compressor. To this end, the handle is arranged, according to the invention, on the fore end of the nozzle holder, and is formed as a tubular supply conduit for the air, whilebeing suitably combined with the'air nozzle, in a manner such that the latter forms a tube extending through the handle in the transverse direction thereof, said tube'being removably' arranged together with the handle on the nozzle holder... v

However, the invention is not confined to the use of the paint sprayingdevice in connection with a vacuum cleaner, inas'much as itpermits of being employed to advantage alsoin connection with other sources of compressed 'air for relatively low pressures. 'Ihe invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, which show a form of embodiment of the paint spraying device. Fig. 1 is an assem bly 'view, of the paint spraying device, and'Fig." 2 shows a vertical section through the same to a larger scale. Fig. 3 is an elevation. ofan arrangement for providingaipressure above atmosphere in the paint container of a paint spraying device according to the',invention.' "Fig. 4 is a crosssection of a detail. Fig. 5 is apartly sectioned elevation of a modified construction of the arrangement according to Fig. 3.

As will appear from Fig. 1, the paintspraying device is provided with'a paint nozzle I and an air nozzle 2; which are concentrically arranged on the fore end ofa nozzle holder'3. The paint nozzle is screwed into a bore 4, the inner'end of which opens into avertical bore 5 having a paint supply tube 6 screwed into the same. In the example shown, the paint is supplied from a bottle-like'container'l, the neck portion of which is screwed into the enlarged end 8 of the tube 6, When the paint spraying deviceiskept in the normal operating position shownin the drawing, the tube 6 and the container 1 take a vertical position. I l

. The air nozzle 2 consists of acylindrical sleeve arranged on the fore end ofthe nozzle holder 3,

said sleeve being provided with'two registering Application sep'tember 20, 1949, SerlalNo. 116,832 In Sweden September 21, 1948 zflla ms- (01- 299-49) fitted into two diametrically located registering apertures in the cylindrical wall of the handle,

and is preferably rigidly connected. with. the

handle. It is located at some distance from the end wall. ll of the handle, so that the air will have free access to the air nozzle from all sides. After .the air nozzle 2' and the handle 10 have been arranged on the. nozzle holder, they, are locked to the latter by means of a screw I2 threaded. into the end wall H and entering with the point 'thereofinto recesses provided in the air nozzleandin the nozzle holder.

.. The paint valve consists of a needle valve, the spindle 13 of which extends throughthe' paint channel 4 .and through an aperture in the nozzle holder 3, and further through a spring housing 14 containing a return spring l5 threaded onto the spindle, said springbearing at one end thereof 'on an.. abutment 16 on the spindle and at the other-end thereof on a plug I! screwed into the cylindrical. spring housing. The spring housing isscrewedinto .a rear extension 18 of .the nozzle holden andthe innerendof the spring housing bears on a packing I9 to tighten the passage opening of the spindle in the nozzle holder.

Screwed .onto the threaded end of the spindlev I3 located outside the spring housing is a cylindrical sleeve 20 surrounding the spring housing and provided at the opposite. end thereof with an annular flange 2|. v The valve is opened by means of an ,operating contrivance arranged .on the handle and taking the form of a double-armed lever 22 which is pivotally arranged on a bracket 23 secured to the rear side of the handle. The longer lever arm is intendedto be actuated by the same hand by which the paint spraying device is grasped at the handle l0. ,When the lever is pressed inwardly toward the handle, the shorter lever arm acts upon the annular flange 2|, so that the sleeve 20,- and consequently, the valve spindle will be displaced rearwardly against the action of the spring I5, the valve being thus opened. When the lever arm 22 is released, the

valve is closed by the spring l5. The magnitude of the opening movement is limited by the lever arm- 22 abuttingagainst the handle. 20. The opening movement may be varied, however, by the sleeve 20 being turned on the threaded portion of: the spindle l3, the annular flange 2i be- ,By means of this contrivance the stopping position of the valve movement may be controlled so that a predetermined quantity of paint will be ejected, when the lever 22 takes its extreme pressed-in position.

In known paint spraying devices of the gun type it is consistent with common practice to make the valve operating contrivance in the form ofsa trigger arranged on the-front side ,of

the handle rObviOi'isIyQ-Such a c mmence-may also be employed in the paint spraying device as described, but in that case special motion trans -.ontothe upper end of the plaint container. The

member 28 is likewise providedwith a bore 33 extending toward the tube '2 9, the lower end of said mitting members in the form of displaceable rods or the like will have to be arranged for the actua tion of the sleeve 20 and the valve needle. However, the provision of such motion transmitting members involves a complication: o..the c'on-Q struction, the arrangement as described being1 thus preferable.

After the upper portion of the paint container t has been brought into communication with the atmosphere through the removal of a threaded plug 24, the paint is supplied from the container 1 at a pressurecorrespo'nding to the level "ofthe liquid above the nozzle. When requiredfthis head may be increased by the substitutionjof a longer tubefor the tube B. The head may also be varied by an adjustment oi the paintcontainer, for instance by keeping the paint spraying device in various positions of inclination orby tiltingthe paint container relatively to thespraying device, for which purpose the tube 6 maybeproyided with ajoint. The provision of such a joint also facilitates spraying in a vertical direction.

The spraying device may alsobe turnedfin its I entirety relatively to .the handle, or; the handle may be turned about the sleeve 12, thehandle permitting thus of beinglocked in difierent angular positionsby means of thescrew'. l2.

.. As stated, the paint spraying device is primarily adapted to be connected to, a vacuum cleaner with the use of the vacuum cleaner as anaircom pressorin knownmanner... The air tube of the vacuum cleaner is connected to the lower end. of

the tube 'lllhaving a diameter fitting to the nozzle tube of the hose. Sincethe air pressure obj- ,tainableinthis way is relatively low, the air n ozzle Will have tofbe fed withjcomparatively large quantities ofair, which is rendered possible by the handle being made to the form of a tube of a large diameter and by the air nozzle being given 1 asufiiciently great internal width. The construction and the arrangement of the handle and the nozzles shown in the drawings have proved very suitable for the effectuation of a sufllciently'powerful paint jet in spite of the low air pressure.

Through'the construction" and arrangement of the various parts of the paint spraying device as described the latter mayea'sily be taken apart for cleaning. Thus the handle with the airnozzle may be removed by the loosening of the screw I 2. Furthermore-the sleeve 20 and the spring hou'sing may be screwed off and be removed fro'in the nozzle holder 3 together with the spindle l3. After-the paint container and the tube 6 have been removed, the paint carrying parts I and 3 are directly accessible for cleaning.

If desired, the air nozzle may be rigidly connected with the nozzle holder or with the handle.

In the construction according to'Fig. 3, the

tainer through a contrivance shown in'section and to a larger scale in Fig. 4. "It consists of two container, and the paint liquid will stand under a pressure above atmospheric, which is equal to the superatmospheric pressure of the air in the supply conduit, which pressure is sufficient to ensure the ,i equisite pressure of the paint liquid also in such positions of inclination of the paint container wherein the head of the liquid is comparativelyfsn'iall. While maintaining the paintcontainer 'finthe position of adjustment relatively tolth e handle as shown in the drawing, the paint spraying device may be inclined, when used, in the vertical plane of the paint spraying device extending throughthe axis of the nozzle as well as in a plane at rightangles thereto. When opcrating in such positions of inclination wherein the paint-might flow out intothe hose 25, the connections' 21, 28, 29 is turned about the pipe socket 3| ,sothat the member 28 will, take a position higher-than thatof the member 21. Said extension.35of the nipple 34 provides further safety against the paint flowing out into the hose 25. Obviously, the connecting means 21,28, 29 may serve the same purpose in such cases of employ ment where the paint container 1 is. adjusted into different angular positions relatively to the handle LU by the turning of the handle and the nozzles, respectively, about the nozzle axis, as describedwith reference to Figs. 1 and 2.

When required, the hose connection may be readily dismounted by the removal of the connectin means 21, 28, 29 from the pipesockettl. which may then be closed by means of a plug. 'For the same purpose the lower end of the hose is preferably removably inserted into the opening 26 in, the handle. c

The modification shown in Fig. 5 is adapted to be" brought. into service in such cases where a pressure, reducing valve 36. is connected into the air supply conduit,,the hose 25 being then connected ,to vthe air supplyjconduit at a point of the conduit located in front of said valve 36. In the ,exampleshown, the air is introduced into the handle through a hose 3'! thrust with the enlarged endv portion 38 thereof into the lower endfof the handle. "Inserted into said enlarged portion is an internally threaded sleeve 39 perhose 25 is connected tov the. hose 3! bymeanspf .a rubber memberAlsoas to permit of being loosened, when required.

Wha t is claimed is l. A paint sprayingdevice, comprising a paint and air nozzle holder,a tubular handle attached tothe nozzle holder and forming an air supply conduit, a paint nozzle on the fore end of the nozzle holder, a paint valve, a valve operating device on the handle, valve actuating means including a spring housing attached to therear end of the nozzle holder, at tubular air nozzle attached to the nozzle holder and projecting transversely through'the tubular handle, a paint container mounted on the nozzle holder, an elastic conduit forming a connection between the paint container and the interior of the handle for maintaining a pressure above atmospheric in the paint container, and a tube connecting the elastic conduit with the upper portion of the paint container, said tube extending radially of the paint container and being rotatable about the longitudinal axis of said container. v

2. A paint spraying device as claimed in claim 1,

The following references are of record in th file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number 7 Name Date 1,603,612 Krautzberger Oct. 19, 1926 1,766,503 Brinkenmaier June 24, 1930 {2,196,800 "Krautzberger Apr. 9, 1940 2,401,504 Paasche June 4, 1946 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 523 Great Britain 4...--- 1909

Patent Citations
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US1603612 *Sep 14, 1925Oct 19, 1926Albert KrautzbergerAir and color spraying apparatus
US1766503 *Feb 20, 1925Jun 24, 1930Matthews W N CorpPaint gun
US2196800 *Jan 6, 1937Apr 9, 1940Krautzberger AlbertSpraying device
US2401504 *Dec 4, 1943Jun 4, 1946Paasche Jens AAirbrush device
GB190900523A * Title not available
Referenced by
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US6595441 *May 6, 2002Jul 22, 20033M Innovative Properties CompanyMixing cup adapting assembly
US6820824 *Jan 14, 1998Nov 23, 20043M Innovative Properties CompanyApparatus for spraying liquids, disposable containers and liners suitable for use therewith
US7086549Jan 16, 2004Aug 8, 2006Illinois Tool Works Inc.Fluid supply assembly
US7090148Jun 3, 2003Aug 15, 20063M Innovative Properties CompanyMixing cup adapting assembly
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Classifications
U.S. Classification239/345, 239/375, 239/367, 239/373
International ClassificationB05B7/12, B05B7/24, B05B7/02
Cooperative ClassificationB05B7/2478, B05B7/12, B05B7/2437
European ClassificationB05B7/24A24, B05B7/12, B05B7/24A3T1