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Publication numberUS2613080 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 7, 1952
Filing dateFeb 21, 1951
Priority dateFeb 21, 1951
Publication numberUS 2613080 A, US 2613080A, US-A-2613080, US2613080 A, US2613080A
InventorsDow Edward P
Original AssigneeDow Edward P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Kicking animal target
US 2613080 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 7, 1952 E. P. DOW

KICKING ANIIAL. TARGET Filed Feb. 2l 1951 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 wwwvs ATTORNEYS a v17Y Oct. 7, E. p DOW KICKING ANIMAL TARGET 3 Sheets-Sheet Filed Feb. 21, 1951 fj' W 8/ 5^ 75 02 NVENTOR 37 73 EDWARD P Dow AT TORNEYS Patented Oct. 7, 1952 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE KICKING ANIMAL TARGET Edward P. Dow, Manitowoc, Wis.

ApplicationFebruary 21, 1951, Serial No. 211,987

3 Claims. 1

This invention appertains to amusement devices, and more particularly to a novel animated target. i

One of the primary objects of my invention, is to provide a target shaped to simulate an animal, with novel means for setting the target in motion when the target plate, i; e., bulls eye, is forcibly struck by a missile. i

Another salient object of my invention is to provide an animated target shaped to simulate a l mule, with means for automatically swinging the body upward at its rear end and immediately thereafter swinging thelegs upwardly and rearwardly, whereby to closely copy the antics of a live, kicking mule, when the target plate is struck by a baseball or similar missile. i 1

A further object of my invention is to provide a ilexible tail carried by the rear quarters of the target so that upon the upward kicking of the legs the tail will swing free upward therewith.

A further important object of my invention is the provision of means for automatically napping the ears of the target during the upward swinging movement of the body of the target.

A still further important object of my invention is to provide means for automatically sounding an audible signal when the target plate is struck, the signal being in the form of a horn to imitate the braying of a mule. f

With these and other objects in view, the invention consists in the novel construction, arrangement land formation of parts, as will be hereinafter more specifically described and claimed, and illustrated `in the accompanying drawings, in which drawings,

Figure l is a front elevational View of my improved target.

Figure 2 is a rear elevational view thereof.

Figure 3 is a view similar to Figure 2, but showing the target after being struck by a missile and the parts to simulate a kicking mule.

Figure 4 is an enlarged fragmentary detail sectional view, taken on the line 4-4 of Figure 2, looking in the direction of the arrows, illustrating the target plate andthe releasecatch actuated thereby.

Figure 5 is a detail, fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 5--5 of Figure 2, looking in the direction of the arrows, illustrating the mounting of the body of the mule on the main support.

Figure 6 is a vertical sectional View taken on the line 6-6 of Figure 2, looking in the direction of the arrows, illustrating the mounting of the swinging rear legs on the body.

Figure 7 is a fragmentary detail horizontal sec- 2 tional view, taken on the line l-l of Figure 2, looking in the direction of the arrows, illustrating the release mechanism for the swinging legs after limited swinging movement of the body.

Figure 8 is a det-ail sectional View taken on the line 8-8 of Figure 2, looking in the direction of the arrows, illustrating `the snubber and shock absorbing mechanism utilized for limiting the upward swinging movement of the rear legs of the target.

Figure 9 is a detail sectional view, takenon the line 9--9 of Figure 2, looking in the direction of the arrows, illustrating the switch mechanism employed for closing the circuit through the electric horn, or other audible signal.`

Figure l0 is a View similar to Figure 9, and showing the engagement of the contacts for closing the circuit upon swinging movement of the body.

Figure 11 is a view similar to Figures 9 and 10, but showing the position of the movable Contact after the completion of the swinging movement of the body. I i

Figure 12 is a detail vertical sectional view taken on the line I2---I2` of Figure lO, showing the arrangement Vand construction of the contacts.

`Figure 13 is a detail vertical sectionalview, taken on the line I3--I3 of Figure 2, looking in the direction of the arrows, illustrating the mounting and construction of the ears of the target.

Referring to the drawings in detail, wherein similar reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several views, the letter T generally indicates my animated target. The same in its preferred form takes the shape of a mule, and hence includes a body l 5 and head I6 formed integral with one another; front legs I1 and I8, and rear legs I9 and 20. The target is provided with suitable appendages such as a ilexibletail 2| and ears 22 and 23. The body I5 and its head I6, the legs `I`I and I8 and the legs I9 and 20 have their outer exposed surfaces suitably upholstered, as a-t 23, to give a rounded, pleasing effect to the entire target. The body I5, at the desired'point is provided with a target opening 24 of a certain size in rear of which is positioned the movable target plate 25, which will be later described in detail.

` The body I5 is mounted for swinging movement on the legs I1 and I8 and hence these legs are rigidly secured to a suitable support against movement for effectively carrying the body. As

iillustrated, braces 26 and 21 are secured to the vturning movement by a bracket 35, which is secured to the leg I 8. The bracket Sil is provided with a resilient arm for engaging and holding the nut. By referring to Figure 5, it can be seen that the legs Il and IS are rigidly connected together by the use of suitable blocks 3l and bolts 32. Rearward of the front legs Il and lil and forwardly of the rear legs IS and 2i), is a. supporting standard 33, which isrigidly secured to the floor, or other supporting base, and this standard extends up over the inner face of the body I5, and is rigidlyconnected` to the'inner front leg EB, by a brace strap Se.

From the description so far, it can be seen that the body I5 is mountedfor free swinging movement on its pivot bolt 2S. The body is guided on the standard 33 by a guide loop 35, rigidly secured to the body l5, and this-loop is of a surricient size to allow movement of the body upward along the standard and laterally of the standard.

A relatively strong coil spring 3E, is provided for normally swinging the body I5 on the legs, and one end of the spring is connected, as at 3l, tothe body adjacent to thehead le forwardly of the legs I'I and E8. The lower end of the spring is secured, as at 38, to the rigid leg I3 and hence the spring 35 functions to pull downen the front of the body and swing up the rear end of the body. The guide loop 35 functions to limit the upward rear swinging movement of the body and if preferred, I can provide another guide loop 39, rigidly carried by the body and which receives the upper end of the inner leg I8. This loop 39 eiectively guides the body in its swinging movement and limits the swinging thereof. If desired, a second contractile coil spring e!) can be employed for cooperation with the spring 3B, to swing the body. The upper end of the spring 4l) is secured, as at lll, to the upper end-of the inner leg I6, and the lower end of the spring is connected asat 42 to the body I5 rearwardly of the pivot point of the body. An additional contractile coil spring dll can also be employed for insuring the proper swinging of the body and this spring is arranged adjacent to the upper end of the body. The extremeY upper end of the spring is connected tothe leg Itand the lower end of the spring is connected to the` body.

The body is normally held inits lowered position against swinging movement, as shown in Figures l and 2, by a pivot latchlever 63. This lever is rockably mountedv adjacent to its lower end on a pivot pin lill, carried byv a bracket 45, rigidly mounted upon'the body l5. The extreme lower'end of the lever is provided with a hooked nose 4B for interengagement with a keeper lll, which is rigidly secured to the immovable, leg I3. Hence when the latch lever is connected with its keeper, swinging movement of the body under tension of the springs SI5, I8 and 49 is prevented. An expansion spring lil is employedfor. normally holding the lever in its latchedposition, and this spring also has another function, which willnow be brought out.

The target plate 25, as heretofore stated, is disposed directly in rear of the opening 24 and is mounted for rearward sliding movement under the impact of a baseball or the like. To facilitate the sliding of the target plate, the same is provided with a rearwardly extending guide rod 8, which is slidably mounted in a U-shaped bracket 5D, rigidly connected to the body i5. The guide rod 49, also extends through an opening 5l, formed in the upper end of the latch lever The expansion spring 48 is coiled about the rod 49 and one end. of the `same engages the bracket 50 and the other'end of the samepresses upon the latch lever and forces the latch lever against the target plate 25, and holds the target plate against the body. As soon as the target plate is forcibly struck, the same will move inwardly against tension of the spring 48 and rock the lever llt, and release the same from its keeper di and at this time the body will swing in an upward direction at itsrear; end.

The rear legs IS and 2d are mounted for swinging movement on the body I5 and the body I5 positionedbetween'the upper ends of the legs and the body and the legs areconnected by a pivot bolt 52, on which thev legs swing. The bolt is heldin position by a1 nut and the nut in turn is heldagainst theaccidental rotation thereof by a resilient arm 53` carried by the leg. A relatively strong contractile spring 54 is utilized for normally swinging the legs upwardly to a kicking position, and one end of the spring is connected to the body I 5andthe other end of the spring is connected to the leg 2ll'above the pivot bolt 52. The legsv I 9 and 2D are rigidly connected together for synchronous movement by a brace block 5t disposed below the body I5, as is best shown in Figure 6. The tail 2|-, is formed from flexible material, and is carried by the legs, and as these legs are swungrv upwardly under the influence of the spring 54, the flexibletail is also thrown up iniparting. a.v lifelike motion to the target.

Meansis provided for latching the legs I5 'and 25 in their lowered position against swinging movement, asshown in Figures l and 2, and this latch construction is such that upon release of thebody l5 by its latching lever d3, and 'the swinging movementv of the body, the legs IG and Et will be released for the kicking action. lhis latch mechanism includes a swinging latch lever for interengagement with a latch keeper 56 rigidly carried by the leg Si@ above and iowardly of the-pivot bolt 52and this latch keeper arm has a beveledl face 5l which projects forwardly beyond the leg E9. The latch lever 55 is carried by a pair of swinging links 58 and The inner end of the lever 55 is pivotally connected to the upperend of the link 53, and the lower end of this link is pivotally connected 'to the rigid standard d. The swinging link 5: is pivotally connectedl to the body I5 of the target andthe-upper-end of this link 59 is pivotally connected to `the latch lever 55, adjacent to the outer or latch endV of said lever. A light contractile coilspring GB isutilizedfor normally holding the latch lever 55 and thez links 58 and 59 up against downward collapsing movement and against a stop bracket Gl secured to the body l5. It is to be noted, that tholight spring @d is connected to the lever- 55, adjacent to the point or connection of the lever with the link 5t. The outer latch end. ofthe latch lever 55, lis provided with a beveled face 6,2-, which corresponds to the beveled face 5l ofthekeeper arm 55 and the latch end of the lever is provided with a stop plate t3.

When the parts are in their inactive position, as shown in Figures 2 and 7, the latch lever 55 is of the beveled faces 51 and 62 and`the stop plate t3 functions to position thesefaces relative to one another and swinging movementlof the legs IS and 20 is prevented. The beveled face `62 of the latch lever corresponds to thearc of swinging of the body I5 on its pivot bolt 28 and whenthe body is released by its latch lever 43 and the body swings up, the beveled face 82 "will ride past the beveled face 51 of vvthe keeperarm 58, allowing the legs to swing upwardly and rearwardly under the influence of the heavy spring 54, and it is to be noted, that the latch lever 55 is pushed upwardly, by the link 59 durin'glthe swinging of the body, due to the movement of the pivot point of the lever 59 toward the link 58 `and the rigid standard 33, and the tensionoi the light spring 50 is overcome by the heavy springs 38, 40 and 40.

When the target plate is struck and the bodi swings upwardly and the legs rearwardQall-of the mechanism can be quickly reset by merely pushing down on the legs I9 and 28 and then swinging down on the body and resetting the latch lever 55. w

The legs I8 and 28 are swung back and up rather forcibly by the heavy spring 54,' and consequently I prefer to use a snubber or shock absorber to cushion and limit this upward swinging movement. The snubber and cushioning mechanism includes a guide rod 64, arranged below the pivot bolt 52 and the forward end of the rod is slidably mounted in a guide bracket 65, rigidly secured to the body. The iorwardend of the guide rod is provided with a stop collar BS and a cushion spring Eily is coiled aboutthe rod and is adapted to engage the bracket 55 upon upward swinging movement of the legs I5! and 28, as shown in Figure 3. The opposite end of the rod slidably extends through a bracket E5, which is pivotally mounted, as at `69 on the leg 2li, and the rear end of the .guide rod is provided with a stop 15. A cushion spring 1I is coiled about the rod and is conned between the stop 18 and the swinging bracket 68 and functions to absorb shock, as the legs swing rearwardly, as shown in Figure 3. v 1 l It is also one of the features of the invention, to sound an audible alarm, when the target plate 25 is struck, and when the body I5 swings on its pivot 28. This audible signal is preferably in the nature of an electric horn 12 mounted upon the head I6 of the body. The horn is preferably pitched to somewhat imitate the braying of a mule. The terminals of the horn have connected thereto electric conducting wires 13 and 14 and the wire 13 leads to a contact 15 forming a part of a circuit closer, which will be later described. The wire 'I4 leads to a terminal of a transformer 16 and the other terminal of the transformer is connected by a Wire 11 to a resilient contact arm 18, which will also be described. The transformer 'I6 can in turn be connected to any suitable source of electrical energy. The contact is in the nature of a shoey and is provided with an arcuate leading face 19 and the contact is rigidly secured to the body I5 for movement therewith by means of a bracket 80. Fastened to the bracket and to the contact is a guide block BI oi insulation (see Figure 12) The contact 18 is in the nature of a resilient arm and the inner end of the arm is rigidly connected to the upper end of the leg I8, and hence is held stationary by said4 leg. The eX- treme forward end of the resilient contact 18 is provided with an outwardly curved guide lip 82 `for engagement withv thearcuate `face 19 of the y,

contact shoe 15,`as will now be described. By referring to FiguresZ `and 9, it can be seen that when thebody` I5 is in its lowered normal position,the guide lip 82^of the resilient arm is positioned forwardly ofthe contact shoe 15v and. out of engagementtherewith. However,V upon release of the bodyythehead portion IB of the body will move forwardly and downwardly and the guide lip 82 willengage the curved surface 'i9 of the contact shoe and will ride over the surface thereof, as shown in Figure 10, establish ing a circuit through the electric horn 12. Upon continued downward swinging movement of the head I6, the shoe 15 willride past the resilient contact arm 18, and the circuit throughthe horn 12 will be broken (see Figure 11).` Upon the rei settingof the target `and the upward swinging movement of the head I6, the contact shoe 15 will again move toward the resilient contactarm i 18 and the `curved lip 82 will engage the rear curved lace 83 of the insulating block 8l and hence the resilient arm will be pressed inwardly and will not engage theelectrical conducting portion of the contact shoe 15. f Upon movement oi the shoel15 past the lip 82 (see Fig. 9), the reby a cross pin 8,8. `,Rockably mounted on the pivot pin 86, is a forwardly extending rod 8l'. The rear end of the rod is pivotally connected at 88' to a bracket') carried .by the upper end of the leg I8. `Upon swinging movement of the body on lthe pivot bolt 28, the head will move down and-the ears 22 and 23 will be pulled rearM wardly, as shown in Figure 3. l

My'amusement device fis particularly adapted foruse in amusementparks and the like, as a game of skill, and each customer is given a pren l determined number of missiles such as baseballs and throws the balls at the target plate 25. Upon the striking of the target plate, the device is set in operation,` asheretofore described.

From `the foregoing description, it can be seen that I have provided an amusement device which will closely simulate the lifelike motion of a kicking mule upon the striking of a target plate.

Changes in details may be made without de parting `from the spirit or the scope of this in'my vention, but what I claim as newis:

1. An animated amusement device simulating the appearance of `a kicking mule comprising a pair of front rigidly supported legs, a body rock--v ably mounted at its forward end on said legs,'

spring means normally tending to swing the body on the legs with the front end of the body in a lowered position and the rear end of the body in a raised position, said body having a target openu ing, a movable target plate in rear of said opening, a releasable latch normally holding the body in a normal lowered position against movement under said spring means, means operatively connecting the target plate to the latch for releasing the latch when said target plate is forcibly struck, rear legs pivotally carried by the rear end of the body, spring means normally urging the legs to a raised kicking position on said body, and cooperable latch means between the body and .aandoen a .front beveled nose, .-aiswinging .latch lever, .a

swinging supporting linkrzpivotally l.connected v.to the forward end of the :latch -lever .and ,pivotally connected f-to Aa rigid ,part :of the device, :a llitt .lin-k ,pivotally .secured to :the body vand .to the latch :lever 'adjacent to its y.latch.er 1d,-.1said latch .end of the .lever .having :a :beveled nose for interlatching engagement with th-e beveled nose fof the :keeper xbar zand .means normally ,holding .-the

latch lever andthe links linfa'Dredeterminedraised position. y

42. An animated amusementdevice simulating .the appearance of :a liickingrmulezcomprisingza .pair of front rigidly .supported legs, Iabcd-y rockably mounted Yat `its forward `send `.on tsaid legs, springmeans normally .tending -to swingzthe .body on .the :legs with the front :end Vof 'the fbo'dy -.in .a lowered-positionand therear endof `.theldociy inv a raised position, Hsaid body ,having a target iopening, a movable targetiplate .in ,frear .of 'sa-id -opening, -a yreleasable latch normally y*holding 'the body in a normal .lowered position against :movement .under :said spring means, means operatively conlnecting the itargetplate to the 1latchffor releasing the latch when said :targetplate is .forcibly struck, rear legs pivotally carried by the rearlend of fthe body, spring means .normally .urging the :legs to a raised kicking position .on Esaid body, .and cooperable latch means :between the `bodyfand said rear legs for normally .holding `thelegs in xa Alowered position .against the .tension of said spring means Awhen V said body ,is Ain Iits inormal lowered position, said last named latch .means including a rigid latch vkeeper barsecured to :the .rear -legs .above the pivot point thereof having x,a iront bev-- eled nose, ya swinging :latch lever, .a .swinging .supporting link pivotally `connected Yto v`the .forward end 4of the latch lever and pivotally ,connected to a rigid part-of the device, a .-lift .link -pivotally secured to vthe .body Y.and :to the .latch lever adjacent to its latch end, said -latchend offthe lever having -a beveled .nose for linterlatchingengage- .mentwith the'beveled/noseof the keeper bar and means normallyholding the latch slever and the links in a predetermined `raised position, zand resilient means ylimiting the =upward swinging movementof the legs.

"8 -3. .animated vamusement Vdevice simulating `the appearance of afkicking -mule comprising `Ia .pair fof iront rigidly supported legs, a body rock- 'ably mounted fat `its forward end on said legs,

`spring means normally tending to swing the body v`on `thedegs lwith 'the front vend -of the body in a lowered position and the rear end of the body in arased position, saidbodyhaving a target opening. a movable target plate in rear of said opening, .a releasable latch normally holding the body in a fnormal lowered position against movement under said spring'means, means operatively con- .nectingthe target plate to the latch for-releasing the latohwhen saiditarget plate is forcibly struck, :rearilegs pivotallyzcarried `by the rear end of the body, spring .means normally Aurging the legs to ra raised .kicking position v'on r`said body, and coopierablelatch means between `the body and said rear legs for normally holding the .legs ina low- :ered position :against the :tension of said spring .meanswhenasaidibodyis in its normal loweredpon sitiOn, said last named latoh Vmeans including a -rigidlatchkeeperbar secured tothe rearlegs above the pivot point thereof having a front beveled rnose, fa swinginglatch lever, a 'swinging supporting linkpivotally connected 'to the forward end yof the latch lever :and :pivotally connected to a :rigid y.part :of #the :dei/ice, a ilift .link pivotally secured vto the body 'andito theiatch liever adj aoent tozitslatch yend, said latch'endof the lever 4having a beveled noseforiinterlatching engagement with vthe beveled nose -of :the keeper bar, means -nor- :mally holding the .latch `lever land the links in a predetermined raised position, 'and ia `flexible tail lcarried by the uppenend of fsaidrear legs.

EDWARD IP. DON.

REFERENCES CT-EB The following lreferences fare of record v.in the UNITED STATES `PATENTS ,Number Name -Date .214,615 'Bowen Apr. 22, 1879 .628,519 `Burke et al July 11, 1899 858,777 Anslinger July 2, 1907 871,701 Jeckeri;v NOV. 19, 1907 1,047,396 Erdman Dec. 17, 1912 .1,129,801 Hendren Feb. 23, 1915 .1,217,714 `COX Feb. 27, 1917 ,1,754,030 .Mattson Apr. .8, 1930

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US214615 *Mar 6, 1879Apr 22, 1879 Improvement in toys
US628519 *Nov 21, 1898Jul 11, 1899Richard P BurkeToy.
US858777 *Aug 25, 1906Jul 2, 1907Joseph MatzAmusement device.
US871701 *Mar 16, 1907Nov 19, 1907Joseph F JeckertToy.
US1047396 *Apr 8, 1912Dec 17, 1912Emil M ErdmannToy.
US1129801 *May 3, 1913Feb 23, 1915Walter S HendrenToy.
US1217714 *May 17, 1916Feb 27, 1917Charles H CoxAmusement device.
US1754030 *Mar 8, 1928Apr 8, 1930Mattson Bernard OTarget
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2846810 *May 31, 1957Aug 12, 1958Ory Willie BDummy calf for practicing roping, lassoing and tying
US2953869 *Feb 28, 1956Sep 27, 1960Fritz CollischanToy figure
US3041074 *Jun 14, 1960Jun 26, 1962Butler Stanley CToy targets
US3254442 *May 16, 1963Jun 7, 1966Ostrander Robert KDoll with independently articulated buttocks
US4203233 *Jun 23, 1978May 20, 1980Crane Charles JCalf-tying practice dummy
US6168160 *May 28, 1999Jan 2, 2001Hasbro, Inc.Ring toss game with moving target
US7556268 *Mar 23, 2007Jul 7, 2009Action Target, Inc.Drop target
US8579293 *Apr 22, 2011Nov 12, 2013SS Roping, LLCAnimal roping system
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/383, 446/333, 273/374
International ClassificationA63H13/00, A63H13/02, F41J5/00, F41J5/18
Cooperative ClassificationA63H13/02, F41J5/18
European ClassificationF41J5/18, A63H13/02