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Publication numberUS2613093 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 7, 1952
Filing dateAug 23, 1948
Priority dateAug 23, 1948
Publication numberUS 2613093 A, US 2613093A, US-A-2613093, US2613093 A, US2613093A
InventorsForesman Harry B
Original AssigneeForesman Harry B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Window sash balance
US 2613093 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 7, 1952 H. B. FORESMAN 2,513,093

wINnow sAsH BALANCE Filed Aug. 23, 194e 2 SHEETS- SHEET 1 ATTORN EY Oct 7, 1952 H. B. FoREsMAN WINDOW sAsH BALANCE TSHEET 2 Filed Aug. 25, 1948 2 SHEETS INVENTOR,

' ATTORNEY FIG. 5

Patented Oct. 7, 1952 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE WINDOW sAsH BALANCE Harry B. Foresman, Oklahoma City, Okla Applicata@ Augustzs, i948, serial Nq. 45,7416' The present invention relates to` mechanism for adjustably positioning `vertically slidable window sash, and `more particularly to spring mechanism for retaining such sash in various positions of vertical adjustment.

The principal object of the present invention, is to provide a spring mechanism which will eliminate, or supplant, the conventional sashcords, pulleys, and sash-weights.

` An important object or the present invention is to provide a spring tension unit which, wheninstalled, resides on the inside surface of the side member of a window frame, thus making it possible to eliminate the conventional sash weight wells or channels usually built into the exteriors of said side members.

Another object is toprovide a mechanism of this class which is simple to install, has few movingparts to become Worn or to get out of order, and which is cheap "to manufacture.

A further objectis to providea spring friction device capable 0f being compounded to accom modate heavy weight sash;

An additional object is to provide a friction producing loop-type spring, adapted to reside in a vertical channel in the outside edgesurface of a vertically sliding window sash, said spring capable of being installed upon or removed from the sash without dismounting the sash from the window frame, and without removing any of thev framesl stop-strips.

i Another object is` to provide such spring with resilient reinforcing elements which may be insented within the spring loop in order to increase itsy friction producing capabilities.

A furtherl object is to provide a spring of this class, which can be used as an anchor for one end of a helical sash lifting spring.

Other objects will be apparent from the following description, when taken inV conjunction with the `accompanying two sheets of drawings, wherein: i

Figure 1 is an elevational View of a conventional Windcw frame, housingV two vertically slidable window sashes, and showing in dotted lines, two of the devices of the present invention op'eratively installed;

Figure 2 is an enlarged vertical sectional view through one side of the frame and one of the sashes, and illustrating the device of the present Figure 4 is an enlarged perspective View of one offthe friction spring members, and also showing a 'reinforcing spring which is adapted to be removably inserted within the nrst spring member;

4 Claims. (CL mile-76)` 2 v Figure 5 is a view somewhat similar to Fig. 3, but illustrating' one of the` friction springs installed without any lifting spring; and,

Figure 6 is a fragmentaryvertical sectional view through the side window frame member and the `lower portion of a sash, the view illustrating` installation of two of the friction springs and one of the reinforcing springs.

Like characters of reference designate like parts in those gures of the drawings in which they occur.

In the drawings:

- The reference numeral I indicates, as a whole,

a conventional window frame having `an upper sash 2 and a lower sash 3 slidably mounted be-` tween its twotvertical side members. The two sashes may be of any conventional type `which includes a pair of vertical side rails 4, a horizontal top rail 5, and ahorizontal bottom rail E.`

The window frame I may ibe of any conventional type, includinga horizontal sill 1, a horizontal topv plate 8,1 and two parallel vertical side members extending between the sill and the plate. The left hand one of these two Vertical side members is shown in Figs. 2, 3, 5, and 6, and is indicated by the reference numeral 9.

Any suitable mechanism may be provided for balancing the weight of the sashes 2 and 3, for instance,` the conventional sash weight, `sash cord, and pulley could be used, or as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, a helical retrieving spring I0 may be used for this purpose.

The device of the present invention is for the purpose of providing frictional tension between the outer edge surface of the side rail of the sash, and the inner surface ofthe side member 9, so as to retain the sash in any vertical position. One `of the` devices of the present invention may be installed in the lower end of either one or both of the side rails of a sash, or could beim stalled in the upper end of suchrail. n

One of the spring tension or friction spring members of the present invention is best illustrated in Fig. 4 of the drawings, and is indicated, as` a whole, by the reference numerall. The friction spring or element 20 is `formed of a single piece or` strip of strap metal which is shaped as shown while in an annealed condition, and whichis thereafter tempered to provide an inherent resiliency tending to lkeepthe strip in its pre-formed shape. l The element 2!) consists substantially` of a straight flat end portion 2l which may well be termed as `the bracket, a slightly bent or ofi-set portion 22, and a loop portion 23 which forms a complete convolution. The other end portion of the strip, after the loop is made, continues inside the loop beyond the off-set portion 22,l and rests upon inside surface of the lower portion of the loop. This latter end portion is indicated by the reference numeral 24, and is free to move along the inside surface of the loop portion, should the sides thereof be pressed toward each other. Should the sides of the loop 23 be pressed toward each other, their inherent resiliency will resist such bending pressure, and the free end portion 24 will act to further resist such pressure. The resistance supplied by the end portion 24 is considerably greater than that furnished by the loop sides, because when the two sides are moved toward each other, the end portion 24 must eventually deform upwardly. Since the end portion 24 is almost straight, and is short in length, it offers more resistance to deformation than the mere flexing of the two sides of the loop.

That portion vof the loop 23 which lies most remote from the free end portion 24 is reduced in width as shown at 25.

In Figs. 2 and 3, the friction member 20 is shown installed in the lower end of a groove 26 which is formed in the outer edge surface of the side rail 4 of the upper Window sash 2. The element 20 is installed by merely forcing it upwardly into the groove, and then tacking it in place with a nail 21 inserted through a slot 28 in the bracket portion 2l of the element. The depth of the groove is less than the normal width of the loop 23, and consequently when the element 20 is forced into the groove, its sides are compressed inwardly toward each other. The inherent resilience ofthe loop therefore causes its two sides to exert an outward pressure against the side member 9 of the window frame, and also against the bottom of the groove.

The lower end of the helical spring I is hooked into the upper end of the loop 23, and its upper end is attached-to a hook 29 rigidly mounted on the window frame side member 9 adjacent the upper end thereof.

y Ordinarily, one of the elements 2D installed at each lower corner of a sash will furnish suiiicient friction with the frame member 9 to hold the sash in any vertical position to which it is moved. However, if the sash is exceptionally large or heavy, more friction may be necessary. InV order to meet such occasions, an arcuate reinforcing element 30 is provided.

f The element 30 (Fig. 4), is also made of spring steel, and when in its normal form, constitutes an open sided loop as shown. When increased friction is desired, one of the elements 3D is compressed and vis inserted into the loop 23 of the friction element 20. More than one of the reinforcing elements 30 may be used within the loop 23, if desired.

Of course, the friction elements 20 may be similarly installed in the lower ends of the two side rails 4 of the bottom sash 3.

In cases in which sash weights are used to balance the weight of the window sash, the grooves 2B are not needed. In such cases, a comparatively short cavity 3l is provided in the lower end of each side rail 4 of the sash, and one of the friction elements 20 is inserted therein. Such an installation is shown in Figs. 5 and 6.

Fig. 6 illustrates the manner in which two of the'friction elements may be assembled together and installed so that their resilient energy is compounded. Since the slot 28 in each bracket 2| is elongated, the nail 2l may be inserted through both slots and driven into the sash rail. One or more ofthe reinforcing elements 30 may also be used in this double installation.

From the above description, it is thought to be evident that by compounding the elements 20 and 3U, sufficient friction may be obtained to accommodate most window sashes of conventional dimensions and construction.

Obviously the invention is susceptible to some change or alteration without defeating its practicability, and I therefore do not wish to be confined to the preferred embodiment shown in the drawings and described herein, further than I am limited by the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A spring for producing friction between a window frame and the edge of a vertically slidable window sash, including: a loop of resilient strip metal; means for anchoring the loop to the sash; and a loop-like spring element having both its ends free so that they may be telescoped to reduce the normal size of the element, said spring element adapted to be nested within the first loop to resiliently reinforce the same.

2. A spring for producing friction between a window frame and the edge of a vertically slidable window sash, including: a loop of resilient strip metal adapted to nest in a channel formed in said sash edge, and to slidably contact the adjacent surface of the window frame; means'for anchoring said loop in said channel; and a looplike spring element having both of its ends free so that they may be telescoped to reduce the normal size of the element, said spring element adapted to be nested within the first loop to resiliently reinforce the same. i

3. A spring for producing friction between a window frame and the edge of a vertically slidable window sash to support the sash in the frame, including: a strip of resilient sheet metal bent longitudinally outward upon itself t0 form a hollow loop with one end of the strip confined within the loop and free to move longitudinally therein to resiliently` reinforce the same; an outwardly extending olf-set portion formed by the strip and projecting from the loop; and an end portion extending laterally from the off-set portion and forming an anchoring bracket for the strip.

4. A spring for producing sash-supporting friction between a window frame and the edge of a vertically slidable window sash, including: a strip of resilient sheet metal bent longitudinally outward upon itself to form a hollow loop with one end of the vstrip conned within the loop and free to move longitudinally therein to resiliently reinforce the same, said loop adapted to nest in a channel formed in said sash edge; an outwardly extending off-set portion formed by the strip and projecting from the loop; and an end portion extending laterally from the off-set portion along another edge of the sash and forming an anchoring bracket for holding the loop in said sash channel.

' HARRY B. FORESMAN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 522,626 Suydam July 10, 1894 1,145,925 Saul July 13, 1915 1,660,071 Draver Feb. 2l, 1928 2,284,343 Ricci May 26, 1942

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US522626 *Jul 10, 1894 Mary s
US1145925 *Dec 1, 1914Jul 13, 1915John SaulAntirattler for windows.
US1660071 *May 18, 1926Feb 21, 1928Draver Emil RWindow-sash holder
US2284343 *Jul 23, 1941May 26, 1942Ricci Anthony JWeather strip and sash balance
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3087194 *Dec 9, 1960Apr 30, 1963Ruchin ZanWindow replacement unit
US3466806 *Nov 21, 1966Sep 16, 1969Grand Rapids Hardware Mfg CoBalance structure for windows and the like
US4551881 *Apr 23, 1984Nov 12, 1985Plastic Profiles, Inc.Friction brake for a vertical sliding window
US5713623 *Jan 11, 1996Feb 3, 1998Prince CorporationMotion dampener
Classifications
U.S. Classification49/421, 49/429, 16/197, 267/134
International ClassificationE05C17/64, E05C17/00
Cooperative ClassificationE05D13/08
European ClassificationE05D13/08