Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2613487 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 14, 1952
Filing dateApr 21, 1950
Priority dateApr 21, 1950
Publication numberUS 2613487 A, US 2613487A, US-A-2613487, US2613487 A, US2613487A
InventorsVaughn Sidney P
Original AssigneeVaughn Sidney P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of packaging hygroscopic sponges
US 2613487 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 14, 1952 s. P. VAUGHN METHOD OF FACKAGING HYGROSCOPIC SPONGES Filed April 21, 1950 INVENTOR SHJNEY F? VAUGHN ATTORNEY Patented Oct. 14, 1952 ,UNlTEl) METHOD OF PACKAGING HYGROSCOPIC SPO NGE

Sidney P. Vaughn, San Diego, Calif.

Application April 21, 1950, Serial N0. 157,417

I invention relates to a new method of l'packaging hygroscopic sponge for the retail trade, and more particularly to the packaging of what is commonly known as cellulose sponge.

.. .In themanufacture of cellulosev sponge, one of,

phane or similar material, for the market. It has been found thatthe cut blocks of dry sponge will in time shrink, warp out of shape and get very hard, the degree of which depends upon the humidity of the surrounding air. This property of cellulose sponge and similar hygroscopic sponges is very undesirable from a sales point of view. If the buying public are not familiar with the physical properties of such sponges, and if they do not know that the sponge will become softand flexible when wet, the chances are they will passwup the relative hard cellulose sponge :whenit is displayed on a counter; along with soft rubber sponge and buy the non-hygroscopic rubber sponge because of its softness and flexibility.

In my pending application Ser. No. 747,589, filed May 12, 1947, I described a method of packaging hygroscopic sponge in a wet condition, but all of the possible variations were not fully covered in the specifications. This application is intended to cover one variation which is considered practicable and very desirable from a packaging and sales point of view.

The principal object of the invention is to provide a cheap and eflicient method of packaging hygroscopic sponge in a wet condition so that" it will remain soft and flexible for a considerable period of time.

Another object is to provide a method of adding water or other softener to the hygroscopic sponge after it has been packaged in a substantially dry condition in a suitable container or casin that will retard the moisture vapor transmission rate through the casing, so that the sponge will become soft and flexible and will remain so for a considerable length of time.

A further object is to provide a packaged hygroscopic sponge that will remain soft and flexible for a considerable length of time to increase the sales appeal over the now conventional method of packaging the sponge in a substantially dry and hard condition, when compared with a sponge in a Wet, soft and flexible condition.

Other objects and advantages will be readily apparent from the following description:

4 Claims. Cl. 53-6),

2 Figure 1 is a perspective view of a package containing the hygroscopic cellulose sponge,and,

Figure 2 is a vertical section throughthe package and sponge and the tubular needle. I ,3

A block of cellulose sponge or other hygroscopic sponge is cut to the desired size for the market, and packaged in a substantially dry condition by conventional methods in a polymerized ethylene film such as Visqueen, or other suitable transparent and flexible material such as Pliofilm, having a low moisture vapor transmission rate that will retard evaporation and retain the moisturecontent of the sponge for a long period of time. After the block of sponge has been thus packaged and sealed, a suitable quantity of distilled water, or othersoftener mixed with a mold of fungus inhibiter is; injected into the sponge through a hollow needle which punctures the film or casing in which the sponge is packaged. The water or softener rapidly spreads through the hygroscopic sponge and causes it to become soft and flexible. The small hole puncturedby the needle in the film or casing does not materially affect the moisture vapor transmission rate of the film or casing. According to tests over a period of years, it has been found that a polyethylene or Visqueen film .003 thick will retard moisture evaporation from the sponge for a long period of time and will retain the sponge in a moist, soft and flexible condition for a period of twelve months or more, depending upon the humidity of the surrounding atmosphere. This retention of the sponge in a soft and flexible condition materially increases its sales appeal to those not familiar with the physical properties of the sponge.

In the drawings, the numeral I designates the transparent and flexible casing, which is moisture proof, within which the hygroscopic cellulose sponge 2 is enclosed. This sponge is shown as in a dampened condition and is soft and flexible. The numeral 3 designates a tubular needle of small diameter which is inserted through the wall of the casing and injects the water into the hygroscopic cellulose sponge by being forced into the sponge. The water is supplied through the needle from any suitable source. Suflicient water is supplied to the sponge so that it is rendered soft and pliable. After the water is supplied to the sponge, the needle is withdrawn and the small aperture 4 formed by the needle is left uncovered. It has been found by actual tests that this uncovered small aperture does not materially lar sponge so that it will retain its condition when.

moistened and will not harden, shrink and warp lar sponge so that it will retain its condition when moistened and will not harden, shrink and warp when kept for a long time, comprising enclosing the dry hygroscopic cellular sponge in a flexible substantially transparent container which is moisture proof to a high degree, inserting a tubular needle of small diameter through the wall of the container to form a small aperture for thepassage 'of the needle into the container,

passing a moistening fluid through the tubular needle in a suflicient amount to dampen the hygroscopic cellular sponge so that it is moiswhen kept for a long time, comprising enclosing the dry hygroscopic cellular sponge in a thin substantially transparent container which is moisture proof to a high degree, inserting a tubular needle of small diameter through the wall of the container to form a small aperture for the passage of the needle into the container and injecting the needle into the hygroscopic cellular sponge, passing Water through the tubular needle in a sufficient amount to dampen'the hygroscopic cellular sponge so that it is moistened sufficiently to render the same soft and flexible and improve its appearance, and then withdrawing the tubular needle from the small aperture and leaving such small aperture uncovered.

2. The method of packaging hygroscopic cellular sponge so that itwill retain its condition when moistened and will not harden, shrink and warp when kept for a long time, comprising enclosing dry hygroscopic cellular sponge in a flexible substantially transparent container which is moisture proof to a high degree, inserting a tubular needle of small diameter through the wall of the container to form a small aperture for the passage of the needle into the container, passing water through the tubular needle to the hygroscopic cellular-sponge in a suflicient amount so that it is moistened to render the same soft and flexible and improve its appearance, and then withdrawing the tubular needle from the small aperture.

3. The method of packaging hygroscopic cellutened sufficiently to render the same soft and flexible, and then withdrawing the tubular needle from the small aperture.

4. The method of packaging hygroscopic cellular' sponge so' that it will retain its condition when moist and will not harden, shrink or warp when kept for a long time, comprising enclosing the substantially dry hygroscopic cellular sponge in a flexible light transmitting container which is moisture proof to a high degree, passing a tubular needle through the wall of the container and passing a volatile liquid moistening agent through the tubular needle and into contact with the substantially dry hygroscopic cellular sponge within the container and in a suificient amount to dampen the hygroscopic cellular sponge and render the same soft and'flexible, and withdrawing the tubularneedle from contact with the container and holding the volatile liquid moistening agent within the container for a long time.

' SIDNEY P. VAUGHN.

REFERENCES CITED UNITED STATES PATENTS Number 'Name I, Date 2,424,807 Eckman July 29, 1947 2,442,161 Bergstein May 25, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2424807 *Sep 13, 1944Jul 29, 1947American Can CoPiercing device for filling batteries
US2442161 *Oct 10, 1944May 25, 1948Samuel BergsteinMethod of making gas filled flexible containers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2814382 *Sep 21, 1955Nov 26, 1957Lassiter Frederic HCellophane packaging and method
US3126680 *Feb 7, 1958Mar 31, 1964 Figure
US3138515 *Feb 10, 1959Jun 23, 1964Dritz ArthurTransfer sheets and means and combinations thereof
US3188779 *Apr 5, 1962Jun 15, 1965Nat Gypsum CoUniformly humidified paper tape
US4174598 *May 24, 1978Nov 20, 1979Patrick Joseph ShepherdMethod for making a packaged gel refrigerant
US4748792 *Oct 28, 1985Jun 7, 1988501 Rollsponge International LimitedForming and packaging articles of compressible foam material
US6405868 *Oct 13, 1998Jun 18, 2002Rexam SofabSystem for preserving a liquid substance in a flexible container
US6776286Mar 18, 2002Aug 17, 2004Rexam SofabSystem for preserving a liquid substance in a flexible container
US6880312 *Jul 18, 2003Apr 19, 2005Webasto Thermosysteme International GmbhProcess for delivering a cold or heat storage medium into a carrier material
US20020096449 *Mar 18, 2002Jul 25, 2002Rexam SofabSystem for preserving a liquid substance in a flexible container
US20040045260 *Jul 18, 2003Mar 11, 2004Webasto Thermosysteme International GmbhProcess for delivering a cold or heat storage medium into a carrier material
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/431, 15/244.3, 141/329, 141/11, 206/205
International ClassificationB65D85/16, B65D77/00, B65D77/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65D77/02, B65D85/16
European ClassificationB65D85/16, B65D77/02