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Publication numberUS2613862 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 14, 1952
Filing dateMay 12, 1947
Priority dateMay 12, 1947
Publication numberUS 2613862 A, US 2613862A, US-A-2613862, US2613862 A, US2613862A
InventorsVaughn Sidney P
Original AssigneeVaughn Sidney P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of packaging hygroscopic sponges
US 2613862 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 14, 1952 s. P. VAUGHN METHOD OF PACKAGING HYGROSCOPIC SPONGES Filed May 12, 1947 Patented Oct. 14-, 1952 v UNITED STATE METHOD OF PACKAGING HYGROSCOPIC SPONGES Sidney P. Vaughn, San Diego, Calif. Application May 12, 1947, Serial No. 747,589

7 Claims. 01. 226-2) This invention relates to a new method of packaging natural and artificial hygroscopic v sponges for shipment, and more particularly to the packaging of what is commonly known as cellulose sponge.

The method of manufacturing artificial sponges from a cellulose xanthogenate solution, such as outlined in Patents Nos. 1,909,629 and 1,974,393, and many other patents, is well known. In most of the known processes, a mixture of a vicose solution, a pore forming soluble or meltable salt, and reinforcing fibrous material is subjected to one, of many known processes for coagulating and regenating the viscose mixture into cellulose hydrate. The general procedureis'to pack the Viscose mixture in a mold of suitable size and shape and then coagulate and regenerate the mixture to cellulose hydrate. When theseagulation [and regeneration is completed the sponge mass is removed from the mold, washed and treated. The blocks of sponge are then dried, trimmed of its skin, cut into smaller blocks of desired size, and packaged for shipment and sale in a dry condition. I

It has been foundth-at the cut blocks of dry sponge will gradually shrink, warp out of shape,

and get hard When they remain in the open for some length of time. In some cases the smaller blocks of cellulose sponge are compressed. in a dry state in order to reduce shipping costs and to save space. However, when cellulose sponge has been compressed in a dry state for any length of time it will not regain its original shape again until it has been moistened. These properties are very undesirable from a sales point of view and may be avoidedif the cellulose sponge is packaged in accordance with this invention.

In the importation and exportation of cellulose sponge it has been tried in some cases to ship uncut blocks of dry cellulose sponge in a compressed state in order to reduce the cost of shipping. After the compressed sponge reaches its destination it is subjected to a moisture treatment to restore the blockof sponge to its original" size, again dried, trimmed, and 'cut to sizes desired. From a cost point of view this method of packaging sponge has not been found satisfactory.

The principal object of this invention is to provide a cheap and efiicient method of packaging cellulose sponge in a compressed state to reduce t 2 tight container, or a container that the drying out of the sponge, approximately the size of the compressed block of sponge. It has cellulose sponge articles in an uncompressed I state in a substantiallyair tight and transparent container to maintain the sponge in a wet con,-

been found that the cellulose sponge will remain wet in the container. for a considerable period of time and that when thesponge is removed. from its package in a wet condition it willreg'ainv readily-its original shape and size. I 4

Another object of this invention. is to provide a simple method of packaging Wet (hygroscopic) dition and to increase the sales appeal of the article. Heretofore, unpack-aged cellulose sponge articles have "been sold over the counter in a relatively dry, andhard condition which ofiers. little sales appeal to those unfamiliar with the physical properties of cellulose sponge. It has been proven that the packaging of'cellulose sponge articles in a moist and soft condition in a substantially .air tight transparent andflexible 0011-. tainerincreases the sales of the article to a considerable extent.

. Referring to the acompanying drawings, Fig. .1 illustrates an uncompressed block of wet hygro scopic sponge sealed in a substantially air tight flexible container; Fig. 2 illustrates compressed blocks of wet hygroscopic sponge sealed in indi the cost of shipping, and in such a manner that the sponge will regain its original shape when unpacked This object is accomplished by compressing the cellulose sponge while in a wet condition and packaging it in a substantially air compressed and packaged in another substan-. tially air tight container of a size that will retain vidu-al flexible containers whichaare compressed and packaged in a shipping carton; and Fig. 3 illustrates a large uncut compressed block, of Wet hygroscopic sponge sealed in a substantially air tight and waterproof shipping container.

The following methods serve to illustrate the invention:

(a) Wet cellulose sponge is compressedand packaged in a pliable and substantially air tight container made of cellophane, or other suit-able material, :of a size approximately the size of the compressed block of sponge to maintain the sponge in a compressed state. .When so packaged the sponge Will remain'soft and pliable for a considerable length of time and will regain its original shape and size when unpacked in a wet state. This property is a very desirable feature from a sales point of view. If desired, a plurality of moist sponges may be compressed and shipped in a single substantially air tight container.

. (1)) Wet cellulose sponge is packaged in an uncompressed state in; a pliable and substantially air tight container made of cellophane or other suitable material. The packaged sponge isthen will retard the sponge in a compressed state. When the latter container is unpacked the compressed filled container will regain its original shape and the sponge will remain soft and pliable for a considerable length of time.

(c) When it is desired to ship large quantities of uncut blocks of cellulose sponge as it comes from the molds, another method is to squeeze the Water out of the sponge after it has been treated with an emollient, leaving it in a wet condition, and compressing the sponge into a substantially airtight shipping container which will retain the sponge in a compressed state. When the sponge reaches its destination, the uncut blocks of sponge may be removed from the shipping container and allowed to regain their original shape. the blocks of sponge have regained their original shape, they may be trimmed while in a wet condition, cut to desired sizes, and repackaged in a wet condition by either. of the methods outlined above. It has been found that cellulose sponge can be cut with a sharp knife when in a wet condition just as easily as when it is dry. This method of packaging sponge for large shipments will reduce materially the shipping costs. f

((i) Moist and soft cellulose sponge articles may be packaged in an uncompressed state in a substantially air tight transparent and flexible container to maintain the moisture content and 1 the above methods, the blocks of sponge as they come from the molds may be cut to sizes desired while in a wet condition, thus saving the cost of drying the spongebefore bein cut, as is now the practice. I

In the manufactureof cellulose sponge the sponge is thoroughly washed and treated with an emollient after it is. removed from the molds. 'In order to prevent the growth of bacteria and fungus in the sponge when it is packaged in a wet condition, it .may be treated with a. chemical that will prevent the growth of bacteria and fungus, at the time it is treated with an emollient, by placing the chemical in the emollient fluid.

Like numerals refer to like parts throughout the drawings.

. Referring to the drawings, numeral 2 designates an uncompressed block of wet hygroscopic sponge sealed in a substantially air tight transparent flexible container I, which may be made of such materials as poly-ethylene, Pliofilm and cellophane, in which are provided very small breather holes 3 (approximate pinpoint size) to .allow for the escape of the air when the package is compressed and'to allow for the intake of air when the package is decompressed. It is found by experiments over. a long period of time that these small breather holes do not afiect materially the evaporation of the moisture in the sponge through the walls of the container. In cases where the ends of the package are not completely hermetically sealed these breather holes will not be necessary.

Fig. 2 illustrates twelve packages of the foregoing package of hygroscopic sponge compressed to about one third A) of original thickness and packaged in a suitable shipping case 4. It is found that the sponge when so packaged will remain moist for long pediods of time, and that the sponge will regain its original size and shape when removed fromthe shipping case.

Fig. 3 illustrates a large uncut block of wet hygroscopic sponge compressed toabout onethird A) of original size and packaged in a substantially air tight and waterproof container 5. The sponge will remain moist for a long period of time, and when unpackaged it will regain its 5 original shape and size, after which it may be cut into smaller blocks of desired size. This method of packaging is desirable when shipments are made by water transportation where the size of the package determines to a great extent the ture content of such sponge when exposed to atmosphere having one hundred per cent humidity, compressing the sponge with said moisture content, and packaging the compressed sponge ina substantially air tight container that will retain the sponge in a compressed state and a wet condition for a considerable length of time.

2. A method of packaging hygroscopic sponge, which includes adding to said sponge a moisture content substantially greater than induced mois ture content of such sponge when exposed to at-' mosphere having one hundred per cent humidity, compressing a plurality of sponges with said moisture content, and packaging the compressed sponges in a substantially air tight container which will retain the sponges in a compressed state and a wet condition.

' '3. A method of packaging hygroscopic sponges, which includes packaging wet sponges in individual pliable containers which are substantially air tight, compressing the pliable containers and the sponges therein, and packaging them in a substantially air tight container that will retain the filled pliable containers in a compressed state.

4. A method of packaging hygroscopic sponge which is cellular, compressible, resilient and taining the moist hygroscopic cellular sponge in the moist' condition for a long time, the flexible light transmitting container permitting the customer to observe the condition of the moist hygroscopic cellular sponge and to feel its flexibility.

5. The method of packaging hygroscopic sponge which is cellular, compressible, resilient and highly flexible and retains its normal size and appearance when moist and which becomes stiif and has its resiliency materially impaired and may have its shape or size altered when dry, comprising taking the hydroscopic sponge having a moisture content substantially greater than the induced moisture content of such hygroscopic cellular sponge when exposed to the atmosphere having one hundred per cent humidity, then enclosing said hygroscopic cellular sponge having said substantially greater moisture content in a substantially air tight container which is light transmitting and highly flexible and thereby retaining the moist hygroscopic cellular sponge in the moist condition for a long time, the flexible light transmitting container permitting the customer to observe the condition of the moist hygroscopic cellular sponge and to feel its flexibility.

6. The method of packaging hygroscopic sponge which is cellular, compressible, resilient and highly flexible and retains its normal size and appearance when rendered suitably moist, comprising applying a volatile fluid moistening agent comprising water to said hygroscopic cellular sponge and thereby imparting to the hygroscopic cellular sponge a moisture content substantially greater than the induced moisture content of such hygroscopic cellular sponge when exposed to the atmosphere having one hundred per cent humidity, then severing said hygroscopic cellular sponge while having said imparted moisture content into smaller sections, then enclosing said smaller sections while having said imparted flexible and thereby retaining said smaller sections in a moist condition for a long time, the flexible light transmitting containers permitting the customers to observe the condition of the moist smaller sections and feel their flexibility.

7. The method of packaging hygroscopic sponge which is cellular, compressible, resilient and highly flexible and retains its normal size and appearance when rendered moist, comprising taking the hygroscopic cellular sponge having water applied thereto and squeezing such hygroscopic cellular sponge to remove the excess water and leaving a sufiicient amount of water in the hygroscopic cellular sponge for imparting to the hygroscopic cellular sponge an original moisture content substantially greater than the induced moisture content of such hygroscopic cellular sponge when exposed to the atmosphere having one hundred per cent humidity, then severing said hygroscopic cellular sponge while having said imparted moisture content into smaller sections, then enclosing said smaller sections while having said imparted moisture content in substantially air tight containers which are light transmitting and highly flexible and thereby retaining said smaller sections in a moist condition for a long time, the flexible light transmitting containers permitting the customers to observe the condition of the moist smaller sections'and feel their flexibility.

SIDNEY P. VAUGHN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Fourness et a1. Dec. 31, 1946

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2986142 *Feb 8, 1954May 30, 1961American Hospital Supply CorpLiquid packaging and dispensing means
US3238599 *Feb 27, 1964Mar 8, 1966Dow Chemical CoPadding method
US3246443 *Sep 7, 1961Apr 19, 1966Gen Tire & Rubber CoFoam cushion material packaging
US3307318 *Feb 27, 1964Mar 7, 1967Dow Chemical CoFoam plastic filler method
US3374882 *Dec 13, 1965Mar 26, 1968Dow Chemical CoCompressed sponge package
US3541752 *Jun 7, 1968Nov 24, 1970Ness IrvingPackaging of compressible goods
US3546828 *Oct 25, 1967Dec 15, 1970Phillips Petroleum CoPackaging compressible materials
US4179027 *Aug 24, 1978Dec 18, 1979Warren WeisbergHigh impact strength partially liquid filled bag
US4594835 *Sep 28, 1983Jun 17, 1986Imperial Chemical Industries PlcMethod for making sachets
US4989733 *May 21, 1990Feb 5, 1991Marc PatryReady-to-use medical trays
US6711879Apr 13, 2001Mar 30, 2004Ultracell Medical Technologies Of Connecticut, Inc.Method for producing surgical sponge device and product thereof
EP0046021A1 *Jul 22, 1981Feb 17, 1982Imperial Chemical Industries PlcSachets and methods for their production
WO2000063079A1 *Mar 9, 2000Oct 26, 2000Ultracell Med TechnMethod for producing surgical sponge device and product thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/431, 53/435, 29/91, 100/39, 206/205, 100/35, 53/438
International ClassificationB65D77/02, B65D77/00, B65D85/16
Cooperative ClassificationB65D77/02, B65D85/16
European ClassificationB65D77/02, B65D85/16