Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2613991 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 14, 1952
Filing dateSep 8, 1950
Priority dateSep 8, 1950
Publication numberUS 2613991 A, US 2613991A, US-A-2613991, US2613991 A, US2613991A
InventorsSchindler John
Original AssigneeSchindler John
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Packaging
US 2613991 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. SCHINDLER Oct. 14, 1952' PACKAGING Filed Sept. 8, 1950 INVENTOR. 4 JOHN SCHINDLER 82%,4

ATTORNEY Patented Oct. 14, 1952 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE? PACKAGING John Schindler, Brooklyn, N. Y. Application September s, 1950, Serial No. 133,745

' (c1. ass-a4) 7 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in packaging chemicals, chemical compounds, volatile and non-volatile, absorbent materials and many others; in a form of package wherein the package and its contents are put in use without removing the contents fromsaid package.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a package for materials of the characteristics described, wherein bodies of the material are enclosed in a perforate strip having portions of the opposite walls thereof adhered to enclose said bodies and other portions of the walls adhered to isolate said bodies from one another.

A. further object of the invention is the provision of a package for materials wherein bodies or groups of bodies of material are. spaced along the surface of a perforated flexible strip, one edge of the strip being folded over to and adhered to the surface of the strip adjacent tothe opposite edge thereof, thereby embracing said bodies or groups of bodies, and a further feature of adhering opposite surfaces together between said bodies or groups for isolating the latter from one another.

,Yet another object of the invention is the provision of a package formed of perforated strip means, wherein the perforations are of suihcient size for air to pass into and out of the package, said strip means having portions adhered together to isolate the articles packed therein from each other, and means to uncover an edge of said package carrying an adhesive of sufficient width and/ or strength to support the package and contents on a suitable object.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a package in the form of an elongated stri formed of a flexible non-metallic material, said material having air communicating perforations therein, bodies or groups of articles spaced apart from each other along said strip, said strip being adhered together to enclose said bodies or groups and to isolate them from each other, said package having at least one longitudinal. edge formed of overlapped portions of said material bordering the edges thereof, other tear perforations in one of said portions a predetermined distance from said edge, so that the material. from said edge to said tear perforations may be torn ofi tov uncover adhesive adjacentv to its mating edge, thereby providing means for supporting the package in use on a suitable object.

Other objects and advantges of the. invention will beapparent to. those skilled in the art upon a. study of this. specification and the accompanying; drawings,

Referring to the drawings which are merely given by way of example to. illustrate theinvention:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of a. portion, partly broken away, of a length of my new and improved package and contents; 1

Figure. 2 is a sectional view taken along: the center line of one of the articles. of Figure 1;:

Figure 3 is a perspective view showing a'strip of the packaging material being removed from the package to uncover the adhesive on thezportion of the package with which the. removed strip mated so. that said uncovered adhesive may be used tosupport the package on an object;

and

Figure. 4 shows short lengths of. the package and contents adhered. to and supported on a. coat hanger.

Referring first to Figures 1 and. 2, a stripyof flexible non-metallic material. In is. providedwith perforations ll via. which air may pass into and out. of the package. The strip 10. also has. arow of tear perforations 32 formed therein in. spaced relation to one edge. thereof.. The articles to: be packed may be of any form; however, in the: example given, the articles are assumed. tobe mothballs. It. The mothballs are. spaced apart from each other, and the strip It]. embraces these mothballs and the material ofv the package in a predetermined area. adjacent" to each. edge; are brought together and secured.

These may be secured together in. many ways; however, I prefer to secure these; edges together with. a non-drying adhesive, such. as is employed on cellophane tape, etc, now on the market.

An. area of adhesive. I14. of a, predetermined width, which width is: Wider than the distance of the. tear perforations I2. from. the edge, is disposed on the material, this being the underneath edge as viewed in Figure 1. Areas, ofv adhesive. [5, whichmay be of the same type as adhesive M, are disposed on the material between the articles l3 so as to. isolate them. from each other. This results in; the edges being joined at I4 to enclose the mothballs l3, and the wall portions of, the package between the. articles l3 are joined. together along the line it indicated in. Figure. 2, thereby producing an elongated packagacontaining the spaced articles 13.

In use, a predetermined length of the. package may be; cut oif lengthwise of any ofthe areas. I5, and thereby a desired. number; of the; articles for use. is severed from the entire; package. Now when. the. package or aportion thereof istobeaput in. use, the strip. Lila separated from the-strip it: along the perforations l2. in the manner shown in Figure 3, thereby uncovering an area Ha of adhesive which area is used to support the package on any suitable object.

In the arrangement shown in Figure 4 the package has had two groups of two articles cut oil from it, and the strip [a has been removed, and the uncovered adhesive I 4a has been adhered to the coat hanger 15, one pair of articles being supported near one end thereof and the other pair near the other end thereof.

Although the example given in the drawings shows the package as containing mothballs, it will be understood that my package may be used to contain balls, flakes, crystals, nuggets, pellets of naphthalene, para-dichlor-benzene or any other volatile chemicals or compounds. The package may contain materials suitable for use in toilets, water closets, or any other part of a toilet or bathroom. It may contain materials to be used in clothes hampers and the like. It may contain ant bait and other poisons for ants and insects or repellents for such, and due to the form of the package it may be placed out of the reach of children and/or pets. It may contain charcoal tablets to absorb odors in refrigerators or pellets or crystals to absorb moisture.

Recommended places of use are: adhering the package around doorways, along the edges of shelves, baseboards, to walls and doors. It readily adheres to hangers of wood, plastic or metal; it will adhere to clothing, carpets and inside clothing bags, whether they be made of plastic, cloth or paper. It may be also used in Wardrobes, whether they be formed of wood, plastic or even in cedar chests. They may be attached to the bottoms of furniture, mohair, etc.

One important advantage of this form of packaging is that the contents of the package are .never removed. Therefore, it is excluded from contact in any way with the hands, clothing or any other materials with which it is to be used.

'This makes it safe from the poison angle, safe from the possibility of staining materials, and I have found that it is one type of package that can be placed in use and promptly forgotten.

Although I have herein shown and described the invention in connection with the packaging .of one type of material, it is obvious that many changes may be made in the arrangements herein shown and described within the scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a package, an elongated non-metallic casing having a plurality of articles spaced apart from each other therein, adhesive means provided in certain areas of said package, at least one longitudinal edge of said package being bounded by co-extensive longitudinal areas cemented together with said adhesive means, other lateral co-extensive areas also cemented together with said adhesive means and extending between said articles toward said first areas and isolating said articles from each other, and perforations formed in the walls of said package placin said articles in communication with the atmosphere, .said cemented lateral areas being of such width that they may be severed on a median line extending therethrough without releasing any of said articles.

' 2. In a package an elongated double walled non-metallic casing having a plurality of articles aligned in spaced-apart relation therein, adhesive ,means provided in certain areas of said package,

at least one closure for said package consisting of -,overlapping areas extending longitudinally of said package and cemented together with said adhesive means, opposite interior walls of said package between said articles also being cemented together with said adhesive means along lateral areas of substantial width, and perforations formed in the walls of said package providing means placing said articles in free communication with the atmosphere.

3. In a package to be used without removing the contents therefrom, certain areas of said package having adhesive means therein, an elongated double Walled flexible non-metallic member having longitudinal area adjacent to the edges thereof cemented together by said adhesive means, a plurality of articles therein disposed in spaced-apart relation to each other, adjacent areas of the walls of said package between said articles also being cemented together by said adhesive means to keep the articles separated, said adjacent areas being of such width that portions of said package may be severed from the remainder without releasing any of said articles, and perforations in said walls providing communication with said articles.

4. In a package to be used without removing the contents therefrom, adhesive means being provided in certain areas of said package, an elongated double walled non-metallic casing having a plurality of groups of articles spaced apart from each other therein, one longitudinal edge of said package being bounded by co-extensive longitudinal areas cemented together by said adhesive means, one of said areas being cut by a longitudinal row of tear perforations, termed tear perforations disposed in spaced parallel relation to one of said longitudinal edges, the space between said perforations and said last edge being substantially less than the width of the adhesive in said longitudinal areas, other narrow co-extensive areas cemented together by said adhesive and extending between said groups of articles and toward said first area to isolate said groups from each other, and communication perforations formed in the walls of said package and communicating with said groups of articles.

5. In a package to be used without removing the contents therefrom, adhesive means being provided in certain areas of said package, an elongated double walled flexible member having longitudinal areas adjacent to the edges thereof cemented together by said adhesive means, a plurality of articles therein disposed in spacedapart relation to each other, adjacent areas of the walls of said package between said articles also being cemented together by said adhesive means in bands of substantial width to keep the articles separated, said bands also being adapted to be bisected without releasing any of said articles, and perforations in said walls providing communication with said articles.

6. A package comprised of an elongated casing embracing a plurality of spaced-apart articles and having longitudinal edges cemented together by means of a longitudinal area of an adhesive, a portion of said casing adjacent to one of said edges being removable to uncover a longitudinal portion of said area, means in said casing comprised of lateral areas of said casing cemented together by means of said adhesive for isolating said articles from each other, and communication perforations in the walls of said casing providing communication between the atmosphere the purpose of utilizing said band for adhering said package on a support.

7. In a package to be used without removin the contents therefrom, certain areas of said package having an adhesive therein, a double walled elongated flexible plastic member having tear perforations spaced apart from one longitudinal edge thereof and having elongated areas adjacent to the edges thereof cemented together by said adhesive, the spacing of said tear perforations apart from said edge being less than the width of said adhesive, a plurality of articles disposed in spaced-apart relation in said package, the adjacent walls of said member between said articles also being cemented together by said adhesive in bands of suflicient width to b severed along a median line thereof without releasing any of said articles, and a plurality of perforations formed in said member to provide communication between said articles and the at- 7 6 mosphere, the portion of said area between said tear perforations and the edge thereof being adapted to be removed to uncover the adhesive on the cooperative edge for adhering said package to a support.

J OHN SCHINDLER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,604,927 March Oct, 26, 1926 1,611,119 Lipper Dec. 14, 1926 1,831,677 March Nov. 10, 1931 1,883,421 Stevens Oct. 18, 1932 2,970,736 Johnson Feb. 16, 1937 2,130,680 Ferenci Sept. 20, 1938 2,246,984 Palmer June 24, 1941

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1604927 *Jun 5, 1926Oct 26, 1926Carl MarchMoth-ball holder
US1611119 *Sep 24, 1926Dec 14, 1926Lipper Mfg Co IncTextile-mounted camphor ball
US1831677 *May 1, 1929Nov 10, 1931March CarlMoth ball holder
US1883421 *Jul 31, 1930Oct 18, 1932United Shoe Machinery CorpBinding strip for parts of boots and shoes
US2070736 *Jan 23, 1935Feb 16, 1937Gerh Arehns Mek Verkst AbMethod of covering articles with wrappers
US2130680 *Jun 22, 1934Sep 20, 1938American Mach & FoundryMethod of wrapping window packages
US2246984 *Dec 30, 1939Jun 24, 1941Leaton CorpAdhesive display
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2745591 *Dec 22, 1951May 15, 1956Brown Bridge Mills Company IncStay tape
US2798636 *Feb 17, 1955Jul 9, 1957Harry W KetchledgeGarbage pail bottom lining
US2852134 *Jul 8, 1955Sep 16, 1958Philips CorpFlash lamp packaging
US2964438 *Dec 18, 1956Dec 13, 1960Fiore A MasseMasking paper
US3021632 *Jan 21, 1960Feb 20, 1962Leslie J GombarFish lure accessory
US3099352 *Sep 28, 1961Jul 30, 1963Walter AvenCalendar reminder and dispensing device
US3185394 *May 24, 1963May 25, 1965Farrell JohnAttachment for garments
US3575345 *Jun 5, 1969Apr 20, 1971Fred H Buck JrDeodorizer dispenser
US3661326 *Jan 7, 1970May 9, 1972Wilson Milton AInsecticide and repellant holder for attachment to garbage can lid
US3724002 *Oct 19, 1970Apr 3, 1973Arrowhead Ind IncDeodorizer dispenser arrowhead
US3801011 *Sep 18, 1972Apr 2, 1974Minnesota Mining & MfgHumidity control means and packages containing the same
US3844478 *Dec 29, 1972Oct 29, 1974J DavisDeodorant structure
US4004685 *Mar 7, 1972Jan 25, 1977Economics Laboratory, Inc.Treatment of fabrics in machine dryers
US4976062 *Jun 2, 1988Dec 11, 1990Justin RutledgeRodent or reptile repelling product and method
US5312566 *Sep 9, 1992May 17, 1994American Technologies Group, Inc.Air intake system device
US5492675 *Sep 2, 1994Feb 20, 1996Brizard; Cyril J. C.Deodorant system
WO1996031244A1 *Apr 3, 1996Oct 10, 1996Leonard PaulAir freshening and/or deodorizing system
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/60, 206/213, 206/.5, 206/526, 220/87.1, 493/334, 239/57, 156/218, 206/820, 53/464, 261/DIG.880, 261/DIG.650
International ClassificationA01M1/20, A01M13/00, B65D75/20
Cooperative ClassificationY10S261/88, Y10S261/65, Y10S206/82, A01M1/2055, B65D75/20
European ClassificationB65D75/20, A01M1/20C2S