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Publication numberUS2614002 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 14, 1952
Filing dateNov 7, 1949
Priority dateNov 7, 1949
Publication numberUS 2614002 A, US 2614002A, US-A-2614002, US2614002 A, US2614002A
InventorsSnow Barton S
Original AssigneeT W Snow Construction Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sand dispensing apparatus
US 2614002 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 14, 1952 B. s. SNOW SAND DISPENSING APPARATUS 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. '7, 1949 frz 2X52: for Barzozz i 5720 w- Oct. 14, 1952 B. s. SNOW 2,614,002

SAND DISPENSING APPARATUS Filed Nov. 7, 1949 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Oct. 14, 1952 B. s. snow SAND DISPENSING APPARATUS 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Nov. '7, 1949 192%: for

.Filed NOV. 7, 1949 Oct. 14, 1952 B. s. SNOW 14, SAND DISPENSING APPARATUS 4 Shets-Sheet 4 SIVND FILL fizz/erz for."

Patented Oct. 14, 1952 SAND DISPENSING APPARATUS Barton S. Snow, Batavia, 111., assignor to T. W.

Snow Construction Company, Inc., a corporation of Illinois Application November '7, 1949, Serial No. 125,908

14 Claims.

This invention relates to sand dispensing apparatus and method, and while not limited thereto it is particularly adapted for filling the sand boxes on railway locomotives, particularly of the diesel type.

The present invention is an improvement over that of my application Serial No. 19,501, filed April 7, 1948, now Patent llo. 2,561,148, July 15, 1951.

In nicely painted locomotives, and particularly those of the diesel type, it is very objectionable to have dust deposited thereon from the apparatus used forfilling the sand boxes. This objection is obviated in the present invention in which I have provided sand dispensing apparatus such that the dust in the sand is removed from the interior of the dispensing tank before the sand is dispensed into the sand boxes of the locomotive, or other places of use.

Among the objects of my invention are: to provide new and improved sand dispensing apparatus; to provide sand dispensing apparatus having means for removing the dust stirred up in the interior of the dispensing tank prior to the dispensing of the sand therefrom; to provide improved means for handling the sand in the system and dispensing it; to provide an improved combination, construction and arrangement of parts in sand dispensing apparatus; to provide a novel method of removing dust from a sand dispenser; and such further objects, advantages and capabilities, inherently possessed by my invention, as will later more fully appear.

The invention is illustrated in a preferred em- I bodiment in the accompanying drawings, in which- Fig. 1 is a side elevation, partly in section, of sand dispensing apparatus embodying my invention.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged vertical section on a median plane through the dispensing tank and showing some of the associated parts in elevation.

Fig. 3 is a section on the line 3--3 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a partial elevation. and partial section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged transverse section on the line 5-5 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary section on the line 5-6 of Fig. .5.

Fig. '7 is an enlarged transverse section on the line 7-1 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 8 is a diagrammatic side elevation of the main storage tank, the sand lift drum, and the tank for charging sand into the dispensing tanks.

Fig. 9 is a diagrammatic elevation of a pair of my sand dispensing devices shown one on each side of a track and diesel engine.

Fig. 10 is a perspective diagrammatic view of two batteries of my sand dispensing devices located on the respective sides of a railroad track.

In the embodiment illustrated in the drawings, my improved sand dispensing apparatus comprises generally a hopper l'(see Fig. 8) into which the dry sand is introduced from a boxcar -2, or from any other suitable source, andthence into a sand lift drum 3 from which it is forced by air into a sixty ton storage tank l. When needed the sand is introduced in required installments from tank 4 into lift drum 3 from which it is passed under air pressure into a charging tank '5, and from thence through a sand fill pipe line "6, through a coupling member 1 (see Fig. 1) and then upwardly through a supply pipe 8 and down through a larger inlet pipe 9 into'the dispensing tank In. While the sand is thus being fed into the dispensing tank the dust in the loose-falling sand is liberated into the air in the dispensing tank and moves upwardly to and passes through the dust outlet opening II (see Figs. 2 and 6) and downwardly through'the annular Space 12 between the supply pipe '8 and the radially larger outer tubular column 13 which supports the dispensing tank l0. From the lower open end of the dust return space [2 the dust passes into the chamber 14 of the concrete supporting base 15 from whence it passes through the dust return line 16, formed of pipe of larger diameter than the sand fill pipe line 6, to a suitable outlet at a location so far removed from the diesel or other locomotive being filled with sand that the discharged dust cannot settle thereon.

The dry sand in hopper I (see Fig. 8) passes by gravity downwardly through tubular neck I! into the lift drum 3, just below which neck is a vertically movable valve 18' (preferably of the ball type) which when moved downwardly admits sand through a complemental port, and when moved upwardly closes said port to prevent loss of air pressure within lift drum 3. An air pipe l9, connected at its lower end to any suitable source of compressed air, is provided with a manually operated valve 28, by the operation of which, air is selectively introduced under pressure through a pipe 2| into the lift drum'3; Extending laterally from pipe 2| is a pipe 22 which connects with the lower end of a cylinder 23 within which is a piston (not shown) having fixed thereto a piston rod 2 fixed at its lowerend to valve [8 to raise the same before air under pressure is introduced into lift drum 3. This preclosing of valve 18 is to prevent dry sand and dust from being blown out of the port controlled by this valve when air pressure is introduced into the lift drum. This step is facilitated by providing in pipe 2|, beyond lateral pipe 22, a spring controlled check valve so set as to prevent entry of compressed air into the lift drum until after valve l3 has been closed. In other words a smaller amount of air pressure will operate the piston in cylinder 23 than will open check valve 25.

When lift drum 3 has been suitably filled with dry sand, and valve l8 closed by opening valve 20, air pressure will build up to the desired amount in lift drum 3, and force the dry sand upwardly through pipe 26 into the upper portion of the interior of storage tank 4, from whence it will fall by gravity into, and fill the tank.

Any desired number of indicators 21' may be .28 fixed to the flange 29 at the bottom of the tank. Fixed to extend downwardly from flange 29 is a pipe 30 which is larger than pipe 26 so as to provide an annular space therearound for the passage of dry sand from the bottom of the tank, between and around bars 28, from which space the sand passes, under control of a manual valve 3|, through pipe 32 into the hopper I from whence it is passed as desired through valve l8 into the lift drum 3. By this construction the sand may be stored in tank 4 and fed therefrom as required into lift drum 3.

With drum 3 containing sand and air under pressure, the sand may be forced under air pres sure through pipe line 33, under control of a manually operated valve 34, into charging tank 5. The sand in tank 5, being dry and under pressure from the compressed air in drum 3 and pipe line 33, will under control of any suitable valve or valves, be forced from tank 5 through the fill pipe line 6, through coupling member 7,

and then upwardly through supply pipe 8.

Both the tubular column l3 and the inner supply pipe 8 pass vertically through the dispensing tank It), the outer tubular column being sealed by welding at 35, or otherwise as desired, around an opening in the bottom of the tank, and screwed into a sleeve 35 welded or otherwise sealed in an opening in the top of the tank.

From sleeve 36, the inner supply pipe 8 extends upwardly a suitable distance to a plug valve 31 and then to an angle coupling 38 closed at the top and provided with a downwardly extending angular outlet neck 39 which with suitable connections joins with the passageway in the inlet pipe 9 sealed into the top of the dispenser tank I!) so as to deliver sand downwardly into the tank, as will be understood in Figs. 1 and 2. As seen in Figs. 2 and 5 the tank It] is provided in its upper portion with a vertical partition wall 40 just to one side of the vertical center line of the tank, this partition wall being fixed by welding or otherwise to the side walls and the top of the tank. Formed in the bottom edge of wall 40, near one vertical edge, is a rectangular recess or opening 4| of substantial size for the passage of dust therethrough. Fixed to the bottom edge of vertical partition wall 49 is a horizontal partition wall 42 which has a hole through which passes the tubular column forming the dust return pipe [3. Horizontal partition wall 42 at its curved edge, beyond pipe 13, is welded or otherwise fixed to the side wall of the tank In. This provides in the upper left hand corner of tank [0, as viewed in Figs. 2 and 6, a chamber 50 surrounding the upper end portion of dust return pipe I3.

The horizontal partition wall 42 at a slight distance to one side of the tubular column [3 is cut oil at right angles to vertical partition wall 4-0 to provide an opening 43. Extending across the interior of dispensing tank 10, at the bottom edge of vertical wall 40, and parallel therewith, is a rotatable shaft or rod 44 having fixed on its ends outside of the tank, a pair of collars 45 and 46 to hold it rotatably in the tank. Fixed to shaft 44, for swinging movement into and out of opening 43, is a flap valve 41 having an outer angular straight end and parallel straight sides. which provide some openings from the inside of the tank to the inside of the chamber 50, for the passage of dust even when the flap valve is closed. Also fixed to one end of shaft 44 just outside of collar 46 is an arm 48 carrying at its outer end a target 49. As will be seen in Figs. 2 and 6, the dust outlet opening H is near the top of the dust chamber 50. When the dispensing tank 10 is empty or nearly empty of sand the flap valve 4'. will swing downwardly to an angular position as shown in Fig. 6, or even farther. but always at a substantial angle to the dust chamber side of a vertical plane, so as to be pushed upwardly to move into opening 43, by the rising sand as the sand rises in this part of the tank. I

As the sand rises and shaft 44 is rotated by the upwardly swinging flap valve 41, the target 49 will swing upwardly on arm 48 which is always parallel with the flap valve. This serves as a means to indicate when the dispensing tank is filled up to the plane of the horizontal partition wall 42, at which time the inflow of sand may be stopped as later explained. As will be understood from the above, the dust in the sand will be released therefrom as the sand is blown under air pressure into the dispensing tank from inlet pipe 9. This dust circulates in the upper part of the tank above the clean dry sand rising in the lower part of the tank, and is positively carried out by the moving air currents through the openings 41 and 43 (which latter is large when the flap valve 41 is down), the dust chamber 59, the dust outlet opening ll, down through the annular space l2 within the tubular column I3, into the chamber [4 in the supporting base box I5, and thence through the dust return line It to a removed place of exhaust. As seen in Fig. 5 the opening 4| is directly behind the flap valve 41 t permit a free flow of dust into the dust chamber 50 even when the flap valve has been moved upwardly to horizontal position by the rising sand. The passage of dust with the circulating air is indicated by the arrows in Figs. 2, 5 and 6. It is thus seen that the dust is removed from the sand in the dispensing tank, and that the dry sand dispensed to the locomotive, or other place of use, is free of such dust.

The structure for operating the plug valve 3 and for controlling the flow of sand from the dispensing tank to the locomotive will now be described. Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, there is fixed to the outside of the lower portion of dispensing tank In, to extend radially outward therefrom, an arm 5| having at its outer end a vertically extending sleeve 52 having an opening passing upwardly therethrough somewhat larger than valve rod '53 which slides up and down therein. This permits rod 53 to have a slight lateral or bending movement to accommodate :for the swinging motion of arm 54 fixed to the plug of the plug valve 31 for-rotating the same to open or close the passage of sand into the dispensing tank. Arm 54 :at its outer end is pivoted at 55 to a cap 56 or other suitable member fixed to the top end of rod-53.

Rod 53 extends downwardly along the outside of the tubular column 13 which supports the dispensing tank, rod 53 having fixed .at its bottom end a pair of side plates 51 between which are fulcrumed on pin '58 (See Fig. *7) the bend of a bell crank formed at one end with an operating handle 59 and at the other end to a shank 60 which is secured by bolts 6! between a pair of arms 62 from which extend oppositely curved ends 53 pivotally mounted on trunnions 64 extending radially outwardly from curved clamping plates 65 clamped by bolts 66 onto the opposite sides of tubular column [3. When the bell crank handle 59 is vertically down, as shown in solid lines in Fig. l, the plug valve 3 is closed to cut voi f passage of sand into the dispensing tank. When handle 59 is in its uppermost position 0, as shown in the upper dotted lines in Fig. l, the valve 31 is open to permit passage of sand under air pressure into the dispensing tank.

Formed in the bottom wall of the dispensing tank H and radially spaced from column I3 is an outlet opening 57 for the discharge of sand out of the bottom of the tank. Fixed to the lower surface of the tank bottom by welding or otherwise, and having an opening 68 of the same size of, and in registry with opening 51, in its top wall, and a registering opening 59 in its bot tom wall, is a guide member 'illhaving a longitudinally extending opening H therethrough. Guide member ll] at its outer end and beyond 'theside wall of the dispensing tank is formed with a downwardly extending stop flange l2.

Fixed to the lower face of the bottom wall of the guide member 10, concentric with opening 69, is a coupling member F3 to which is connected a depending flexible hose T4 of suitable length to swing sidewise and conveniently reach the sand boxes '15 to be filled (see Fig. 9), which sand boxes may be positioned in any suitable locations with relation to the locomotive, they being merely indicated diagrammatically in the drawing.

Mounted for longitudinal sliding movement in opening H is a slide gate 16, having an opening preferably of the same size as that of openings 6169 and in registry therewith when the slide gate is in open position and closing the passage therethrough when the slide gate is in closed position. By this means the passage of sand from the dispensing tank to and through hose M may be effected or stopped as desired. Fixed to extend downwardly from the under face of slide gate is 2. lug or block T1, the side edges of which extend slightly beyond the side edges of guide members ill. Lug TI is of a vertical height to extend below the bottom wall of the guide member. Pivotally connected to the opposite side edges of lug Ti, by bolt 18, are a pair of laterally spaced arms or links 19 and 8-9 which straddle the hose l4 and the tubular column l3 to be movable therepast. Arms. 19 and 80, at their other ends, are pivotally connected by bolt 8| to the upwardly extending arms 82 and 83 of a bell crank whose other arm 84 is fixed to sleeve 85 rotatably mounted on bolt 86. The lower ends of arms 82 and 253 are also fixedzto sleeve so that arms 82-83, and arm '34 :move together as a bell crank.

clamped around tubular column 13, :by :bolt .86, is a ll-shaped. clamp member 81 which is held against vertical movement on said column. Fixed on the outer end or bell crank arm 84 is a sleeve 88 having a vertical opening through which rod 53 slides with sufficient looseness to permit the sleeve 88 to have a slight rocking movement as the bell crank operates, without binding valve rod 53 in its up and down movement for operating sand valve "31. .Sleeve 88 has fixed on its upper end a flange 89 and on .its bottom end aflange 90. Fixed to valve rod 53, akdistanoebelow sleeve 83, is a set collar 91 having on its upper end a washer or flange .92., against which bears the lower end of a compression spring .93, which :at its upper end bears against the lower end of sleeve 88. Positioned between the upper end of sleeve 88 and the lower end of stationary sleeve -52 fixed to the tank I70, is a compression spring 9 1. Each of compression :springs93 and 94 encircle valve rod 53, and as seen Fig. 1, spring 93 is of greater lengththan spring 94.

From the above it will be understood that when slide gate T8 .is open, with the hole in the slide gate in registry with holes 61-69 and sand being dispensed through hose M, an outward swinging movement 50f valve rod hand 59 from position a topositi'onb, as, viewed in Fig. 1, will compress spring eiand move sleeve 88 upwardly 'suflicient to swing bell crank 82-84 in a clockwise direction as viewed in Figs. 1 and 2. This moves links la-"8n to. the right until the outer end of slide gate 7:6 strikes flange 12, which movement closes slide gate '15 and stops the flow of sand from the dispensing tank to the hose M. Ihis upward movement of valve rod 53 is, however, not sumcient to :open the sand valve 3?. To open sand valve 31 to introduce more sand into the dispensing tank, it is necessary to swing handle "59 from position b to position 0, as viewed in Fig. 1, which movesrod 53 further upwardly to the dotted line position :shown at the top of the rod in Fig. 1. The sand valve 31 is then fully open for the flow of sand into the dispensing tank. This further upward movement of valve rod 53 puts further compression on spring 93 and further insures that slide gatelfi cannot open while sand is being forced under air pressure into tank I0.

Reverse movement of valve rod handle 59 from position c to position b will close sand valve 31, but slid-e gate 16 "will "not :be opened until handle 59 moves from position b to position a. The above construction insures that slide gate 16 cannot happen while sand is being forced into the dispensing tank, and thus, no matter how near empty tank to may be, no dust from within the dispensing tank can find its way into hose M because the slide gate is closed.

I The bottom end of tubular column i3 is formed witha base plate '95 having angular strengthening ribs 96, and is bolted to the supporting base '15 by any suitable number of bolts '91. The top wall of the boxl-ike supporting base 15, around the bottom end of supply pipe 8 is formed with an enlarged opening to constitute a continuation into chamber M of the annular dust'return space l2 between pipe 8 and tubular column 1-3.

As seen in Fig. 10, there is preferably provided a plurality of these dispensing towers on both sides of a railroad track. The towers of each of such 'batteries'of towers are of similar construction to that described above. As seen in Fig. l, the coupling members I are each connected at its ends between lengths of sand :till pipes 6, the adjacent ends of which are connected to the respective ends of the coupling member but do not extend through the inside of the coupling member. This permits sand to be filled into any of the respective dispensing towers as it is needed, preferably one at a time on one side of the track. The towers on each side of the track are in separate circuits, one circuit for one side of the track, and one for the other, each of said circuits having a dead end at the last tower.

The dust return pipes are respectively fixed to the ends of the supporting base boxes I so that the dust from one tower passes downwardly through the space l2 into chamber M, then through dust return pipe I6 into the chamber M of the next tower and so on until the dust is finally exhausted at the removed location of release. Also, if the total number of towers on both sides of the track is not too great, the sand fill line pipes and the dust return line pipes may be run across laterally beneath the track, as shown in Fig. 9. This, of course, depends on the number of towers, and the desired arrangement of piping therebetween. Fig. 10 shows the piping running longitudinally on the two sides of the track.

The foregoing detailed description is given for clearness of understanding only, and no unnecessary limitations should be understood therefrom, for some modifications will be obvious to those skilled in the art.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A sand dispenser, comprising, a dispensing tank, a tubular column on which said tank is mounted, said column passing longitudinally through the inside of the tank, a sand supply pipe of smaller outside diameter than the inside diameter of the tubular column and extending longitudinally therethrough to provide a space therebetween, a closure at the top of the column to close said space, said supply pipe leading back to the inside of the tank to blow sand under air pressure into the tank, and said column near its top having an opening to lead dust from inside of the tank into said space and withdraw it from the tank.

A sand dispenser as claimed in claim 1, in which said supply pipe is provided with a sand valve, and a valve rod longitudinally movable outside of the tank for operating said valve.

3. A sand dispenser as claimed in claim 2, in which said tank is formed with an opening in its lower portion, a movable closure for opening and closing said last mentioned opening, said closure being also connected to be operated by said valve rod.

4. A sand dispenser, comprising, a tank, a pipe passing through the interior of said tank, a smaller sand supply pipe passing through the first mentioned pipe and laterally spaced therefrom to provide a dust return passage therebetween, said first mentioned pipe having a lateral opening inside of the tank through which dust in the tank passes into said dust return passage.

5. A sand dispenser as claimed in claim 4, in which the upper end of the first mentioned pipe is mounted in a walled chamber in an upper corner of the inside of the tank and said supply pipe communicates with the tank to one side of the walled-chamber, one of the walls of said chamber having an opening through which dust may pass from the interior of the tank into and through said lateral opening in said first mentioned pipe.

6. A sand dispenser, comprising, a sand dispensing tank, a sand supply pipe for blowing sand under air pressure into the tank, a valve in said supply pipe, an outlet opening in the lower portion of the tank, a movable closure for opening and closing said outlet opening, a valve rod extending longitudinally of said tank, connections from said rod for operating said valve upon longitudinal movement of said rod, links connecting said closure to a sleeve about said rod, yieldable members pressing against said sleeve and said rod to move said closure with longitudinal movement of said rod, said yieldable members being proportioned to permit movement of said rod to close said closure before opening said valve.

7. A sand dispenser as claimed in claim 6, including a dust return pipe extending into the upper portion of the inside of the tank and having an opening through which dust is removed from the inside of the tank.

8. A sand dispenser, comprising, a sand dispensing tank, a sand supply pipe passing vertically through said tank and having a return above the tank connected to the inside of the tank for conducting sand under air pressure into the tank, a dust return pipe encircling the sand supply pipe and laterally spaced therefrom to form a dust return space closed at the top of the tank, said dust return pipe having adjacent its top a lateral opening leading into said dust return space, a side wall and bottom wall forming a chamber around the upper portion of the dust return pipe, said bottom wall having an opening, a rotatable shaft at the bottom edge of the side wall, a plate fixed to said shaft and swingable upwardly by rising sand in the tank to move into said bottom wall opening, and a level indicator fixed to said shaft outside of the tank to indicate when the sand in the tank has reached a predetermined level.

9. A sand dispenser as claimed in claim 8, in which said chamber side wall has an opening back of the opening in the bottom wall for the passage of dust into the chamber and through the opening in the dust return pipe when the swinging plate is in the bottom wall opening.

10. A sand dispenser, comprising, a dispensing tank, a sand supply pipe for conducting sand under air pressure into the tank, a dust return pipe for conducting dust out of the tank, an outlet opening in the bottom of the tank, a slide gate for opening and closing said outlet opening, a sand Valve in said supply pipe, a valve rod connected to said sand valve for opening and closing it upon longitudinal movement of the rod, a link connected to said slide gate, a bell crank connected at one end to said link, said bell crank having at its other end a sleeve through which said rod loosely slides, a handle pivotally connected to said rod and to a stationary support, and spring means on said rod above and below said sleeve, whereby a certain movement of the rod will first close the slide gate without opening the sand valve, and further movement of the rod will open the sand valve and maintain the slide gate closed.

11. A sand dispenser as claimed in claim 10, in which said spring means comprises a pair of coil springs, the one above the sleeve having a short longitudinal motion, and the one below the sleeve having a longer longitudinal motion.

12. A sand dispenser, comprising: a dispensing tank; a tubular column supporting said tank in elevated position and in communication with the upper interior of the tank; a hollow base membar at the bottom end of said column in communication with the column; a sand supply pipe passing through said base member and said tubular column out of communication therewith, said sand supply pipe being inwardly spaced from the walls of the column to provide an annular dust passage therebetween; said sand supply pipe communicating with the tank for conducting sand under air pressure into the tank; and a dust return pipe line communicating with said hollow base member for conveying dust away from the member.

13. A sand dispensing system, comprising: a sand charging tank adapted to contain sand and air under pressure; a sand supply line communieating with the charging tank for conveying sand under air pressure away from said tank; a plurality of spaced sand dispensing tanks; a branch line leading from the sand supply line to each dispensing tank; a valve on each branch line remote from the supply line for controlling admission of sand and air to the dispensing tank; a dust return line having an outlet remote from the dispensing tanks; and return branch lines each surrounding a sand branch line and conheating the interior of each dispensing tank with the dust return line whereby air admitted to each dispensing tank may pass out through the dust return line and remove dust from the tank.

14. A sand dispensing system, comprising: a

10 sand charging tank adapted to contain sand and air under pressure; a sand supply line communicating with the charging tank for conveying sand under air pressure away from said tank; a plurality of spaced sand dispensing tanks; a branch line leading from the sand supply line to each dispensing tank; a valve on each branch line for controlling admission of sand and air to the dispensing tank; a dust return line having an outlet remote from the dispensing tanks, said return branch lines comprising columns supporting the dispensing tanks and each communicating with a hollow base member, said dust return line being in communication with said base members and said sand supply line extending through the base members with said branch lines.

extending upwardly through the columns, the return branch lines being connected with the interior of the dispensing tanks whereby air admitted to each dispensing tank may pass out through the dust return line and remove ust from the tank.

BARTON S. SNOW.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2955880 *Nov 8, 1957Oct 11, 1960Michael Albers HAir loader for granular plastic material
US3318639 *Jul 12, 1965May 9, 1967Vagn DeveFeeding means for granular or powdered material
US4938637 *Jun 9, 1989Jul 3, 1990Lybecker G WayneMethod and apparatus for bottom loading a pneumatic transport pressure vessel
EP0855322A3 *Jan 17, 1998Dec 23, 1998Bochum-Gelsenkirchener Strassenbahnen AGSand reservoir for low floor railway vehicles
EP1072492A1 *Jul 24, 2000Jan 31, 2001Klein Anlagenbau AGDevice and method for transferring of bulk material into a consumer
EP1437282A1 *Jan 7, 2004Jul 14, 2004Klein Anlagenbau AGDevice and method for filling a storage vessel of a vehicle with brake sand
WO2003049984A1 *Nov 26, 2002Jun 19, 2003Aea Technology PlcSand hopper
WO2016134397A1 *Feb 24, 2016Sep 1, 2016Knorr-Bremse Gesellschaft Mit Beschränkter HaftungPneumatic pump device and metering system and sanding system, comprising a jet pump for flowable material
Classifications
U.S. Classification406/109
International ClassificationB61C15/10, B65G53/12, B61C15/00, B65G53/04
Cooperative ClassificationB61C15/10, B65G53/12
European ClassificationB65G53/12, B61C15/10