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Publication numberUS2614283 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 21, 1952
Filing dateJul 8, 1949
Priority dateJul 8, 1949
Publication numberUS 2614283 A, US 2614283A, US-A-2614283, US2614283 A, US2614283A
InventorsThornwald Everett D
Original AssigneeClements Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic nozzle adjustment for vacuum cleaners and the like
US 2614283 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 2l, 1952 E. D. THORNWALD AUTOMATIC NOZZLE ADJUSTMENT FOR VACUUM CLEANERS AND THE LIKE 2 SHEETS-SHEET l Filed July 8, 1949 51.7' TENS/ON D. THORNWALD AUTOMATIC NozzLE ADJU 2,614,283 STMENT FOR E LIKE Oct, 21, 1952 E VACUUM CLEANERS ANU TH Filed July s, 1949 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 Patented ct. 21, i952 AUTOMATIC NOZZLE ADJUSTMENT FOR VACUUM CLEANERS AND THE LIKE Everett D. Thornwald, Chicago, Ill., assignor to Clements Mfg.- Co., Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application July 8, 1949, Serial No. 103,708

6 Claims.

Myv invention relates to an improvement in vacuum cleaners and has for one purpose'to provide an improved automatic nozzle adjustment for vacuum cleaners and the like for vacuum cleaners having a motor-driven brush.

Another purpose is to `provide an improved nozzle structure for such vacuum cleaners.

Another purpose is to provide a floating nozzle which is adapted automatically to adjust itself to rug and carpet naps of different height and different resistance to brush action.

Other purposes will appear from time to time in the course of the specification and claims.

I illustrate my invention more or less diagrammatically in the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure l is a partial vertical section along the axis of movement of a vacuum cleaner;

Figure 2 is a section on the line 2 2 of Figure l;

Figure 3 is a partial bottom view in the direction of the arrows 3--3 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a bottom plan View of the floating nozzle structure;

Figure 5 is a front elevation of the structure of Figure 4;

Figure 6 is an end elevation of the structure of Figures 4 and 5; Y

Figure '7 is a section on the line 'i-l of Figure 5;

Figure 8 is a diagram illustrating the eiect of belt tension on the herein described floating nozzle structure; and

Figure 9 is a diagrammatic illustration completing, on a smaller scale, the structure of Figure l.

Like parts are indicated by like symbols throughout the specification and drawings.

Referring to the drawings, I generally indicates any suitable ground engaging supporting wheels pivoted, as at 2, to anysuitable structure 3, downwardly projecting from the upwardly and rearwardly inclined bottom wall 4 which assists in deiining a suction passage extending to the suction inlet of a fan chamber Iii, shown in Figure 9. Figure 9 illustrates a fan chamber IDB, a fan Iiii therein, a motor IGZ and a pulley ID3 about which passes the below described belt 4I. It will be understood that the details of motor and fan do not, of themselves, form part of the present invention. The suction nozzle proper includes a rear lip 5 and a forward lip 6, the lips being connected by any suitable side walls 1, the front lip 6 and the side walls 'i being, if desired, `provided with any suitable yielding element or buier strip 8. The front andrearlips 5 anc-1K6 and* the side walls 'I may be unitary withv .the vvbottom wall l of the suction passage, generally'indicated` of the present invention. It willvbe understood that the lips 5 and 6 are normally supported in predetermined relation to the floor surfacefX4 over which the vacuum cleaner rolls. k Y

Movably mounted within the suction. nozzle, but dened by the lips 5 and 6 and the sidewalls '1, is a movable nap engaging structure. Tosupf port it l provide inwardly extending brackets Il suitably secured, for example, by screws' I2, to any suitable boss or enlargement i3, unitary with the nozzle structure 5, 6, l. Pivoted to the brackets II, as at it, arelever structures I5. Each lever I5 may bedescribed as U-shaped, having a forward bend i6 and an inwardly bent component I'I. Each component I'I is slotted, as at I8, the slot having an upper enlargement I9l partly bounded by an arcuate surface 2B. As shown in Figures 6 and 7, there is a difference between the right-hand and left-hand levers.

One of them, as shown in Figure 7, has the:

straight forward wall I 9 at the top of the slot I8.

whereas the other, as at I9a, has an arcuate walled recess. Secured to each of the forward walls I6 is a positioning spring 2|.

The movable inner brush nozzle structure will next be described. As shown, for example, in Figures 4 and 5, it includes a'forward lip 25 and a rear lip26, the two lips being shown as formed of sheet metal, and as being generally upwardly channeled, as shown in Figure 1. The inner flanges 25a and 28a are of considerably less upward extension than the outer anges 25h and 2Gb. The forward and rear channels are connected by suitable end walls 2l. Theend walls Z'I are slotted, as at 28, to receive pivotpins'ZSlA which extend therethrough from the leversfl.l

Thus the levers I5 are not merely pivoted to thel end plates 2l, but are pivoted on movable pivots which permit relative longitudinal movement.v`

Outwardly extending from each end plate vZ'Iare guides or lugs 39, 3|, which are located at. dif-- ferent levels, and which are also locatedat-dif ferent distances from the front of the machine.

Each such lug or guide enters a separate slotor head moves vertically within thespace defined by the Walls or lips 5, 6, l, and, during such ver,

tical movement, the levers I5 pivot about their fixed axes I4, the slots 28 preventing any cramping action at the lower ends of the levers. Thus an adequate floating connection is provided.

34 is any suitable intermittently located wire brush guard extending in general alignment with the below. described belt.

The brush structure includes the fixed shaft 35 extending into bosses 35 of end plates 31. It will be understood that the end plates, bosses and shaft do not rotate in relation to.each. other. 38 is a bearing block, there being one ateach end of the shaft 35. 39 is a brush body rotatably mounted on bearing blocks Y38 and carrying an intermediate belt slot 40 about whichpasses a belt 4I, the opposite end of which passes about the motor and fan pulley, not herein shown. Y

It will be understood that when the motor actuated its pulley, through the belt 4I, rotates the brush body 38 in thedirection of the arrow ofFigure 1. The brush body is provided with any suitable brushes or agitating elements 42, the detalsofwhiclrdo not form part of the present invention. It will be understood that the end plates '3T are supported on the inner component I1 Yof the levers I5. A ready method of support irs-tol provide one-of the bosses 36 with a flattened surface,not'shown,.which is adapted to engage the 'flattened surface I9 of the slot I8, as shown in Fig-ure 7. The spring-2| engages the opposite side of theboss 35 `and forces the flattened surface of the boss against the flat surface I9. It is not necessary to flatten both bosses, and in Figure-a rounded surface I9a is shown in the slot I8, which is vadapted to receive the opposite, unflattenedboss 36. The user can readily insert the" entire '.brush element by merely slipping it upwardly .through the slots I8, with the bosses 36 Aengaging thepositioning springs 2l. It can equally readily be removed by pulling it against the. springs `2I and withdrawing it downwardly through the slots I8. Cut-outs 43 are provided at` each end` of the floating nozzle frame to per mit passagezof the bosses 36.

Vltr-.will be realized that, whereas, I have descrlbediand illustrated a practical and operative device,xnevertheless many changes may be made inxthensize, shape, number and disposition of partswithout departing from the spirit of my invention. I thereforeiwish my description and drawingstobetaken'as in a broad sense illustrativey or; diagrammatic, rather than as limiting me.. to .my precise showing.

`Themse and ,operationof the invention are as follows:

-.I;provi'de astructure in which an outer nozzle 5,16, I is normallyl supported at a predetermined distance from the floor orr from the rug or carpet over which .the vcleaner is pushed. The above described` sub-frame is vertically movable withinthe nozzle. When the motor is not actuated, it may4 move downwardly by gravity, or may simply rest frictionally` atrsome position within its possible movement, within what may be called thegnormally fixed nozzle. But when the motor is actuated. the belt 4I. is moved inthe direction oftheizarrow of Figure 1 to rotate the brush in a.;elockwise` direction, referring to the position of theipartsfin Figures 1 and 8. Figure'8 is a schematic force diagram.

.LThelever I5 is pivotedgas -at I4, the point I4 being locatedabove the resultant line of force oflthe dynamic belt tension. V-This is clear from Figure 1. Upon starting the motor, a clockwise movementsls setup-'about thepivot point I4.

This movement tends to force the brush and the rug seal or floating frame downwardly to- Ward the rug or carpet. This movement is indicated by the arrow 50 on Figure 8. When operating on a high nap rug, the reacting force is such as to retard the downward movement of the floating frame or nozzle or rug seal. It follows, as a result, that the belt tension will increase when the brush is operating on a dense or thick rug. The reacting force of the rug causes a slight decrease in the movement. The condition of equilibrium will develop, whereas the pressure on the rug will remain substantially constant, regardless of nap or weave. The slight rotational displacement of the pivot arm I5 about the pivot I4, under the influence of the belt tension, causes a horizontal and vertical displacement of the connection between the pivot arm I5 and the floating stem and brush support. The floating frame or seal can move only in a Vertical direction, owing to its guiding connection with the fixed nozzle, by means of the projections 30 and 3 I. Thus a proper vertical relationship between the floating frame or rug seal and the nxed nozzle structure is always maintained. At the same time, the proper vertical relationship between the rug seal and the brush is always maintained. The entire unit is readily insertable and readily replaceable.

A relatively snug flt between the fixed structure and the floating rug seal may be advantageous, to prevent air loss, or loss of cleaning efficiency, but no necessity for sealing exists. The suction, of course, should be sufiicient to maintain the rug or carpet somewhat upwardly withdrawn from the supporting surface X, as shown in Figure 8, and in proper contact with the brush bristles or agitator elements 42. However, the adjustment is made in response to variations in the rug, and in reliance upon variations in dynamic belt tension.

I claim:

l. In a nozzle structure for suction cleaners, an outer intake nozzle and means for normally supporting it at a normally fixed and predetermined distance from the surface to be cleaned, a nozzle structure movably positioned within said normally xed outer nozzle, means for guiding andv constraining it to rectilinear, generally vertical movement within and in relation to said outer nozzle, a brush rotatably mounted on said movable nozzle, a driving belt extending about said brush, and combined supporting and actuating means for said movable nozzle including supporting levers pivoted to said outer nozzle for rotation about a single common axis located above the median line between the upper and lowerA stretches of said belt, said levers being pivoted to-said movable nozzle generally at the axis of rotation of said brush.

2.` In a nozzle structure for suction cleaners. an outer intake nozzle and means for normally supporting it at a normally xed and predetermined distance from the surface to be cleaned, a nozzle structure movably positioned within said normally fixed outer nozzle, a brush rotatably mounted on said movable nozzle, a driving belt extending about said brush, and combined supporting and actuating means for said movable nozzle including supporting levers pivoted to said outer nozzle for rotation about a single common axis located above the median line between the upper and lower stretches of said belt, saidlevers being pivoted to said movable nozzle.

A3. Ina nozzle structure forsuction cleaners,

an outer intake nozzle and means for normally supporting it at a normally iixed and predetermined distance from the surface to be cleaned, a nozzle structure movably positioned within said normally fixed outer nozzle, a brush positioned Within said movably positioned nozzle structure, a driving belt extending about said brush, supporting levers for said brush, one of said levers being located adjacent each end of the brush, said levers being pivoted to and within said outer nozzle for rotation about a single common axis, and an additional guiding connection between the movably positioned nozzle structure and the outer intake nozzle formed and adapted to guide and constrain the movably positioned nozzle structure to substantially vertical, linear movement within the outer intake nozzle.

4. The structure of claim 3 characterized in that the supporting levers are pivoted to the outer nozzle for rotation about a single common axis located above the median line between the upper and lower stretches of the driving belt.

5. In a nozzle structure for suction cleaners, an outer intake nozzle and means for normally supporting it at a normally fixed and predetermined distance from the surface to be cleaned, an inner nozzle structure movably positioned within said normally fixed outer nozzleI a brush supported and mounted for rotation on said inner nozzle structure, a driving belt extending about said brush, a guiding connection between said inner nozzle structure and said outer intake nozzle, and an additional connection between the inner nozzle structure and the outer nozzle, including a lever assembly pivoted to the outer nozzle for rotation about a single axis 1ocated above the median line between the upper and lower stretches of the belt.

6. In a nozzle structure for suction cleaners. an outer intake nozzle and means for normally supporting it at a normally xed and predetermined distance from the surface to be cleaned, an inner nozzle structure movably positioned within said normally fixed outer nozzle, a brush supported and mounted for rotation on said inner nozzle structure, a driving belt extending about said brush, a guiding connection between said inner nozzle structure and said outer intake nozzle, and an additional connection between the inner nozzle structure and the outer nozzle, including a flexible connection having a component positioned and adapted, in response to the dynamic tension of the driving belt, to urge the movably positioned nozzle structure downwardly toward the surface on which the suction cleaner is positioned.

EVERETT D. THORNWALD.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,895,507 Case Jan. 31, 1933 1,904,972 Willis Apr. 18, 1933 2,381,710 Arnhym Aug. 7, 1945 2,446,985 Shumaker Aug. 10, 1948

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1895507 *Jan 2, 1929Jan 31, 1933Hoover CoSuction cleaner
US1904972 *Jan 21, 1931Apr 18, 1933Hoover CoSuction cleaner
US2381710 *Mar 18, 1942Aug 7, 1945Singer Mfg CoVacuum cleaner
US2446985 *Jun 1, 1944Aug 10, 1948Singer Mfg CoVacuum cleaner having a floating nozzle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3012267 *Dec 8, 1959Dec 12, 1961Gen ElectricVacuum cleaner with movable nozzle brush
US3639941 *Jun 16, 1970Feb 8, 1972Sunbeam CorpVacuum cleaner
US3671996 *Nov 2, 1970Jun 27, 1972Gaudry Paul ERotary brush adjustment device for vacuum cleaner attachment
US3802026 *Jul 3, 1972Apr 9, 1974Electrolux AbVacuum cleaning apparatus
US3827103 *May 19, 1970Aug 6, 1974Whirlpool CoVacuum cleaner
US4976003 *Apr 11, 1990Dec 11, 1990Williams William HCleaning apparatus
US6243917Jun 30, 1999Jun 12, 2001Fantom Technologies Inc.Floating brush for a vacuum cleaner head
US6261379 *Jun 1, 1999Jul 17, 2001Fantom Technologies Inc.Floating agitator housing for a vacuum cleaner head
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/359, 15/372, 15/392
International ClassificationA47L5/22, A47L5/34
Cooperative ClassificationA47L5/34
European ClassificationA47L5/34