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Publication numberUS2614561 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 21, 1952
Filing dateMar 15, 1950
Priority dateMar 15, 1950
Publication numberUS 2614561 A, US 2614561A, US-A-2614561, US2614561 A, US2614561A
InventorsLe Roy G Fox
Original AssigneeE & J Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Absorber for anesthetic gas machines
US 2614561 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 21, 1952 LE ROY G. FOX

ABSORBER FOR ANESTHETIC GAS MACHINES 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 15, 1950 INVENTOR. 5' dvx/ Oct. 21, 1952 E OY (3, ox 2,614,561

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Bide, ai 0 4 Oct. 21, 1952 E O 3, ox 2,614,561

ABSORBER FOR ANESTHETIC GAS MACHINES Filed March 15, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 5 4A5 ZZ hi .5 r 54- 25 j i b 0 9i i ii i I 1 1 ii 1 P \F i 50 II ii 1 1; u l; i |i II I i .g I 1 6 4 1 1 l I I 32 I -|1I' 1|||IH M 11 7 il 45 i! T INVENTOR.

I Z) 25 zz 25 9 Oct. 21, 1952 LE ROY; F 2,614,561

ABSORBER FOR ANESTHETIC GAS MACHINES Filed March 15, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 I I ",1 H0. 3 CHNISTER NOHB SORPTION J Fig 5 INVEN TOR.

n NOR/1575 Patented Oct. 21, 1952 I ABSORBER FOR AN MAC ESTHETIC GAS HINES Le Roy G. Fox, Glendale, Calif., assignor to E & J Manufacturing Company, Glendale, Calif., a corporation of California" p Application March 15, 1950, Serial No. 149,802

My invention relates to an absorber for an anesthetic machine used in the administration of gas anesthesia to patients in hospitals.

An anesthetic machine is usually used which administers gas anesthesia through a closed mask system to the patients lungs; The purpose of my invention is to place an absorber in the system between the anesthetic machine and the mask to'absorb the CO2 from the exhalations of the patient. As the system from the gas anesthetic machine to the patients lungs is a closed circuit, the exhalations are contained in this line and it is often desirable to remove some or all ofthe CO2 exhaled by the patient.

Prior to my invention a canister containing I soda lime was placed in the gas circulation so as to absorb the CO2. When the soda lime had become saturated with CO2 it would be necesa plurality of canisters is always available to 16 Claims. (Cl. 128- 191) be used either individually or in combination...

to remove the CO2 from the anesthetic gas without at any time stopping the administration of the anesthesia to the patient or without any danger of. air getting in and diluting the anesthetic gas. v I By theiuse of my machine it also is possible to vary the amount of absorption of CO2 so as to leave some of it in the anesthetic gas.

' It also is possible to stop at any time the entire removal of CO2 from the anesthesia and to allow fall of it to remain in the closed circuit;

Other objects and advantages of my invention will be apparent from the following descri'ption' of the preferred embodiments thereof.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a perspective of my invention as used in an absorber for an anesthetic gas machine.

Figure 2 is a top plan view thereof. V Figure 3 is a sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a sectional line taken on the line '4-4 of Figure 3.

1 of Figure}.

Figure 8 is a bottom view of the locking means for the canisters.

Figure 9 is a diagrammatic view showing my absorber in its various operating positions.

An absorber constructed in accordance with my invention has a head I suspended on a post 2, which is adapted to beheld by the com trol table 3 of an anesthetic machine.

The head I has a central bore 4 in which is supported a tube 5 by means of a driven fit.

' Rotatively positioned on the tube 5 is a barrel 6 which is held in position by a sleeve 1. The undersurface 8 of the head I is machined to make an airtight connection with the periphery S of the barrel 6. The sleeve I is adapted to engage a rubber O-ring I0 and by means of the dagger slots II to compress the O-ring I0, support the barrel 6 and hold the surfaces 8 and 9 in an airtight position.

A port IZ'has an attachment I3 threaded therein to which is connected a line I4 from the gas anesthetic machine. The port I2 permits gas from the line I4 to enter the chamber I5 in the head I and to be ported therefrom through the pipe I6 to the common ether vaporizer ll, and from it to the flexible line I8 and to the gas mask l9. Thus thereis formed a continuous line for the anesthesia to pass from the anesthetic machine through the head I and through the vaporizer I1 and gas mask I9 into the patient.

' Upon exhaling, the patients breath passes out through the mask I9, through the line 20, past a valve 2|, to be hereinafter described, into a passage 22 in the head I. Passage 22 is closed by a flat valve 23 to prevent gas from being taken from my absorber through the passage 22 and line 20 during the inhalation of the patients breath, but upon the exhalation the valve 23 lifts on its stem 24, allowing 'exhalaticns to pass into the chamber 25 in the head I.

The barrel 6 is divided into a plurality of cylinders 21, 28 and 29 by a spider 26. In each of these cylinders is positioned a canister 30 hav ing a bottom of wire mesh 3| in which is sup-- ported a quantity of soda lime. Usually in the administration of an anesthesia 400 cc. of soda lime are placed in the. canister. The canisters 30 aresupported by legs32 on a cap 33. The cap 33 has a flan'ge'34 adapted to compress a rubber O-ring 35 against a shoulder 36 on the barrel 6 to form an airtight seal. The O-ring 35 is compressed by means of a ring 31 threaded upon the cap'33 and having thereon lugs 38 adapted to engage under dogs 39 on thebottom surface of the barrel 6. When the lugs 38 are engaged under the dogs 39 the cap 33 may be rotated to tighten the lugs 38 against the dogs 39 and compress the O-ring 35.

The tube has. a slot 40 which is adapted to open into a passage 4| in the spider 26 to port gas from the bottom of the canisters 30 past the legs 32 into the tube 5. The exhalations of the patient passes from the chamber 25 when my absorber is set to absorb CO2 in the canister 30 in the cylinder 21 directly down through the canister past a dispersing bafiie 42 through the one-half of the gas passes through the canister I -41 which are-adapted to receive the spring-loaded pawl 48 carried by the head I to hold the barrel soda lime 43 out through the wire' mesh 3|' and into the tube 5 where it flows upwardly untilit' contacts the flat valve 44. When the patient is exhaling the back pressure in the chamber |5 holds the valve 44 in closed position, but upon 6 in its proper registry during operation.

- The'head I has a port 53 which has a screw plug 54 normally closing the same, but by re- I moval of the screw plug 54 a pressuregauge can be threaded therein to permit the reading of the pressures in the system. A port 55 normally closed by a screw plug 56 permits the attachment of an ordinary ether dropper when it is desired inhalation the valve 44 is open, allowing the gases passing through the canisters 30 to pass into the chamber l5 and to be mixed with any additional anesthesia administered through the port l2. 1 u The tube 5 is open at its bottom and has an expansion diaphragm 45 connected thereto by the nipple 46. The excess gas in the patients exhalations passes into the bag 45 and expands the same. Upon inhalation this gas flows up the tube 5 past the valve 44 into the chamber l5 to be mixed with any additional anesthesia administered through the port |2.

Upon the head I is a pointer 50 and upon the periphery of the barrel 6 are positioned indications of which one of the cylinders 21-, 28 or 29 is in position underneath the chamber 25. When t e indication for Canister No. 11S in line with the pointer 56 the canister 30 and cylinder 29 are directly below the chamber 25; when the barrel 6 is rotated until the pointer 5|) and the legend No. 2 Canister are in re istry, then the cylinder 28 with its canister is directly below the chamber 25; when the No. 3 Canister is in line with the pointer 50 the canister 30 and cylinder 27 are directly below the chamber25. I a

As can be seen, each of the three canisters can be positioned directly below the'chamber 25 and used to absorb the CO2 in the closed system without in any way interfering. with the administration of the anesthesia. When it is desired to have more absorption of the CO2 than is possible from one canister, the pointer 50 is pointed, for example, to the legend No. 2.

and No. 3 Canisters. In this position the cylinders 28 and 29 are each positioned to receive one-half of the gas from the chamber 25 and the passages 4| at the bottom of the cylinders 28 and 29 each port one-half to the slot40. When the pointer 50 is in registry with the legend No. 1 and No. 2 Canisters then one-half of the gas passes through the canisters in the cylinders 21 and 28. When it is desired to stop the absorption of the CO2, then the barrel 6 is rotated until the pointer 5|] is in registry with the legend No Absorption and in this position none of the cylinders 21, 28, 28 can secure any gas from the chamber 25, but the passage 5| in the spider 26 ports the gas directly from the. chamber 25,

to the slot 52 in the tube 5, thus completing the circuit and there will be no absorption of CO2.

When it is desired to have a portion. of the CO2 absorbed, by rotating the barrel 6 the pointer 50 can be positioned to any one of the legends reading A,, or Absorption? for either the No. 3 Canister or the No. 1 Canister. In these positions, for example, the Absorption, No. 1 Canister positions the cylinder 21 and the passage 5| each below the chamber .25 so that.

to add ether to the gas from the anesthetic machine. v

To prevent excessive pressures in the line a spring valve 60 is positioned to port the gases from the chamber 25 to the atmosphere and the screw cap 6| is adjustableto place tension upon the spring valve 60 so that it can be set from 0 to 30 cc. of water.

Another pressure regulating valve which can be used in place of the spring valve 69 is the valve mechanism 2| which comprises two valves 62 and 63, both being flatplate valves. The plate valve 62 is adapted to close a port 64 in a threaded cap 65, which is threaded upon a boss 66 of the valve mechanism 2|. a

A spring 61 causes the valve 62 to seat against the opening 64. However, when the pressure in the valve-mechanism 2| drops below, a set minimum the ports 68 permit a drop in pressure in the cap 65 .to open the valve 62 and allow air to enter the anesthetic system. By moving the cap 65 0n its threads the tension on the spring 6'! can be adjusted.

The flat plate valve 63 is adapted to close a port from the interiormof the valve mechanism 2|, and is held closed by an adjustable weight '10. A housing .H forms a. chamber and the cover plate 72 has thereon a boss 13 which is interiorly threaded as shown at 14 to engage a threaded bolt 15. The threaded bolt 75, has on its lowerend a flange 16, to engage and hold a spring 11 in a bore 18 in the weight 10. When the bolt 15 is threaded upwardly as displayed in Figure 7. it will compress the. spring 11 and remove a'portion of the weight T0 from the flat valve 63. A knurled hand screw I9 is attached to the upper end of the bolt 15 to rotate same and has an indicator dial thereon to show the amount of weight on the valve plate 63. When the pressure in the valve mechanism 2| passes a set maximum it will cause the valve plate 63 to lift along with the weight 10 and port the gas out through the ports 8|.

While I have described the preferred embodi- .ments of myinvention, I am not limited to any port said barrel in airtight relation'to said head,

said tube opening into said chamber, a spider in said barrel forming a plurality of cylinders open at their lower ends, canisters adapted to support a C02 absorber positioned in said cylinder, means for detachably supporting a canister the bottom ofsaid cylinders into said tube, and

an expandable diaphragm closing the lower end of said tube. I

2. In an absorber for an anesthetic machine, a head having a chamber, a port to said chamber for admitting an anesthetic, an outlet from said chamber adapted to' be connected to a breathing mask, a barrelya tube adapted to rotatively support said barrelin airtight relation to said head, said tube opening intdsaid chamher, a spider in said barrel forming a plurality of cylinders open at their lower ends, canisters adapted to support a C02 absorber positioned in said cylinder, means for detachably supporting a canister in said cylinder, a, passage in said head to port gas from said breathing mask, said passage beingpositioned'to port air into one or more of said cylinders depending upon the position to which said barrel is rotated, means for porting the bottom of said cylinders into "said tube, and an expandable diaphragm closing the lower end of said tube, a valve'in said chamber adapted to open and release gas from said tube into said chamber.

3. 'In an absorber for an anesthetic-machine,

I I a head having a'chamber, a port to said chamber for admitting an anestheti an outlet from said chamber adapted to be connected to a breathing mask, a barrel, a tube adapted to rctatively support said barrel in airtight relation to said head,

said tube opening into said chamber, a spider in said barrel forming a plurality of cylinders Open at their lower ends, canisters adapted to suDpOrt a C02 absorber positione'din said cylinder, means for detachably supporting av canister in said cylinder, a passage in saidhead to port gas from said breathing mask, said passage Ming positioned to port air into one or thereof said cylinders depending upon the: position towhich said barrel is rotated, means for porting the bottom of said cylinders into said tube, an expandable diaphragm closing the lower end of said tube, and a valve normally closed in said passage adapted to open and pass gas from said passage into said cylinder.

4. In an absorber for an anesthetic machine, a head having a chamber, a port to said'chamber for admitting an anesthetic, an outlet from said chamber adapted to be connected to'a breathing maslqa barrel, a tube adapted to rotatively support said barrel in airtight relation to sai'clxhead, said tube opening into said chamber, aspider in said barrel forming a plurality of cylinders open at their lower ends, canisters adapted tosupport a C02 absorber positioned in said cylinder, means for detachably supporting a canister in said cylinder, a passage in said head to port gasfrom said breathing mask, said passage being positioned to port air into one or more of said cylinders depending upon the position to which said barrel is rotated, means for porting the bottom of said cylinders into said tube, a valve in said chamber adapted to open and release gas from said tube intoQsaid chamber, and a valve normally closed in said passage adapted to open and pass gas from said passage into said cylinder.

mask, a:barrel,-a tube adapted'to rotatively support said barrel in. airtight relation to said head, saidtube opening into saidchamber, a spider in said barrel forming a plurality of cylinders open at their lower ends, canisters adapted to -support a C02 absorber positionedin said cylinder, means for detachably supporting a canister in said cylinder, a passage in said head to port gas from said breathing mask, said passage being positioned to port air into one or more of said cylinders depending upon the position to which said barrel is rotated, means for porting the bottom of said cylinders into said tube, an expandable diaphragm closing the lower end of said tube, and a passage in said spider positioned to be moved into posi-* tion in relation to said head passage to 'port all or aportion of the gas to said tube.

6. In an absorber for an anesthetic machine, a head having a chambena port to said chamber for admitting an anesthetic, an outlet from said chamber adapted to be connected to'a breathing mask, a. barrel, a tube adapted to rotatively support said barrel in airtight relation to said head,

5. In an absorber for an anesthetic machine,

said tube opening intosaid chamber, a spider in said barrel forming a pluralityof cylinders open at their lower endscanisters adapted to support a C02 absorber positioned in said cylinder, means 'for detachably supportinga canister in said cylin dei', a passage in said head to port gas from said breathing mask, said passage being positioned port air into one or more of said cylinders depending uponthe position to which said barrelis rotated, means for porting the bottom of said cylinders into said tube, an expandable diaphragm closing the lower .end of said tube, said canisters being removably positioned in said'cylinderto permit refilling with CO2 absorberwhen the head passage is closed to the canister refilled. z '7. In an absorber for an anesthetic machine, ahead having porting means for passing an anesthetic gas from an anesthetic machine to a breathing mask, a plurality of canisters detachably supported by a rotating barrel, a passage in said head to port exhaled gas from said breath,- ing mask to one or more of said canisters, and expansible means for porting said exhaledgas from said canister to said porting means to return to be said exhaled gas to said breathing mask.

8 In. an absorber for an anesthetic machine, a head having porting means for passing an anesthetic'gas from an anesthetic machine to a breathing mask, a'plurality of canisters detachably supported by a rotating barrel, ,a passage in said head to-port exhaled gas fromsaid breathing maskto one or more of said canisters, expansible means for porting said exhaled gas from said canister to said porting means to return said exhaled gas to said breathing mask, and means to close oiT all or a portion of said exhaled gas from said canisters and to pass said exhaled gas into said expansible means.

10. In an absorber for an anesthetic machine, a head having porting means for passing an anesthetic gas from an anesthetic machine to a breathing mask, a plurality of canisters detachably supported by a rotating barrel, a passage in said head to port exhaled gas from said breathing mask to one or more of said canisters, ex-

pansible means for porting said exhaled gas from said canister to said porting means to return said exhaled gas to said breathin mask, means to close off all or a portion of said exhaled gas from said canisters .and to pass said exhaled gas into said expansible means, and valve means to .cause said gas to flow in one direction.

11. In an absorber for an anesthetic machine, a head having porting means for passing an anesthetic gas from an anesthetic machine to a breathing mask, a plurality of canisters detachably supported by a rotating barrel, a passage in saidihead to port exhaled gas from said breathing mask to one or more of said canisters, expansible means for porting said exhaled gas from said canister to said porting means to return said exhaled gas to said breathing mask, and means to indicate which of said canister ispassing said exhaled gas.

12. In an absorber for an anesthetic machine, a head having porting means for passing an anesthetic gas from an anesthetic machine to a breathing mask, a plurality of canisters detachably supported by a rotating barrel, a passage in said head to port exhaled gas from said. breathing mask to one or more of said canisters, expansible means forporting said exhaled gas from said canister to said porting means to return said exhaled gas to said breathing mask, means to close off all or a portion of said exhaled gas from said canisters and to pass said exhaled gas into said expansible means, and means to indicate which of said canisters is passing said exhaled gas.

13. In an absorber for an anesthetic machine, a head having porting means for passing an anesthetic gas from an anesthetic machine to a breathing mask, a plurality of canisters detachably supported by a rotating barrel, a passage in said head to port exhaled gas from said breathing mask to one or more of said canisters, expansible means for porting said exhaled gas from said canister to said porting means to return said exhaled gas to said breathing mask, and valve means to prevent excessive positive or negative pressure in said absorber.

14. In an absorber for an anesthetic machine, a head having porting means for passing an anesthetic gas from an anesthetic machine to a breathing mask, a plurality of canisters detachably supported by a rotating barrel, a passage in said head to port exhaled gas from said breathing mask to one or more of said canisters, ex-

pansible means for porting said exhaled gas from said canister to said portingmeans to return said exhaled gas tosaid breathing mask, means to close oif all or a portion of said. exhaled gas from said canisters and to pass said exhaled gas into said expansible means, and valve means to prevent excessive positive or negative pressure in said absorber.

15. In an absorber for an anesthetic machine, a head having porting means for passingan anesthetic gas from an anesthetic machine to a breathing mask, a plurality of canisters detachably supported by a, rotating barrel, a passage in said head to port exhaled-gas from saidbreathing mask to one or more of said canisters, expansible means for porting said exhaled gas from said canister to said porting means to return said exhaled gas to said breathing mask, and a valve mechanism connectedto said chamber comprising an adjustable spring loaded plate valve adapted to open and port air inwardly when the pressure in said mechanism drops below a set minimum, a second plate held closed by a weight means for adjusting said weight said valve adapted to open when the pressure in said mechanism rises above a set maximum to port the gas therein to the atmosphere. I

16. In an absorber for an anestheticmachine, a head having porting means for passing an anesthetic gas from an anesthetic machine to a breathing mask, a plurality of canisters detachably supported by a rotating barrel, a passage in said head to port exhaled gas from saidbreathing mask to one or more of said canisters, expansible means for porting said exhaled gas from said canister to said porting means to return said exhaled gas to said breathing mask, means to close off all or a portion of said exhaled gas from said canisters and to pass said exhaled gas into said expansible means, and a valve mechanism connected to said chamber comprising an adjustable spring loaded plate valve adapted to open and portv air inwardly when the pressure in said mechanism drops below a set minimum, a second plate held closed by a weight means for adjusting said weight said valve adapted to open when the pressure in said mechanism rises above a set maximum to port the gas therein to the atmosphere.

LE ROY G. FOX.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,450,338 Heidbrink Sept. 28, 1948 2,507,607 Miller May 16, 1950

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2450338 *Sep 3, 1946Sep 28, 1948Air ReductionValve structure for controlling flow of gases through absorbers
US2507607 *Mar 18, 1946May 16, 1950Ernest B MillerApparatus for conditioning air
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2675885 *Aug 11, 1952Apr 20, 1954E & J Mfg CompanyAbsorber for anesthetic gas machines
US2706532 *Mar 26, 1953Apr 19, 1955Adsorption Res CorpFluid treating apparatus
US2848309 *Oct 23, 1956Aug 19, 1958Air ReductionCarbon dioxide absorber
US2918356 *Nov 4, 1957Dec 22, 1959Air ReductionTransparent, conductive absorber canister
US3197944 *Aug 7, 1961Aug 3, 1965Hayes Inc C IRotary adsorber having intermittent movement
US3721238 *Oct 29, 1970Mar 20, 1973Ross W IncDisposable anesthesia device
US3830632 *Jul 23, 1969Aug 20, 1974C GuzayCarbon dioxide absorber apparatus
US3835627 *Jan 31, 1973Sep 17, 1974Dryden CorpDisposable apparatus for circle absorption system
US4108172 *Jun 14, 1977Aug 22, 1978Moore Jr George BCarbon dioxide absorption canister for use with analgesia equipment
US4232667 *Sep 5, 1978Nov 11, 1980Jack ChalonSingle limb breathing circuit assembly and absorber
US5228435 *May 13, 1991Jul 20, 1993Smith Charles ASingle patient use disposable carbon dioxide absorber
US5233977 *Jan 14, 1992Aug 10, 1993Marquest Medical Products, Inc.Anesthesia/breather bag with a roughened exterior surface
US5360002 *Oct 28, 1991Nov 1, 1994Smith Charles ASingle patient use disposable carbon dioxide absorber
US5558088 *Oct 28, 1994Sep 24, 1996Smith; Charles A.Single patient use disposable carbon dioxide absorber which is patient tidal volume dependent and self-regulating
US6796307 *Apr 22, 2002Sep 28, 2004The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyMultiple person high altitude recycling breathing apparatus
WO2005046843A1 *Aug 4, 2004May 26, 2005Jorge BonassaCarbon dioxide absorbing system
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/205.12, 96/125, 128/205.17, 128/205.28, 422/430
International ClassificationA61M16/10, A62B19/00
Cooperative ClassificationA62B19/00, A61M16/104
European ClassificationA61M16/10B, A62B19/00