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Publication numberUS2614789 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 21, 1952
Filing dateApr 9, 1948
Priority dateAug 13, 1947
Publication numberUS 2614789 A, US 2614789A, US-A-2614789, US2614789 A, US2614789A
InventorsPathus Labour Jean
Original AssigneeGasoline Res Ind & Commercial
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Obturator for high viscosity liquids
US 2614789 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 21, 1952 J LABOUR 2,614,789

OBTURATOR FOR HIGH VISCOSITYI' IQUIDS Filed April 9. 1948 2 SHEETS --SHEET l INVEN TOR.

JEAN PATHUS LABOUR BY Oct. 21, 1952 J. P. LABOUR 2,614,789

OBTURATOR FOR HIGH VISCOSITY LIQUIDS Filed April 9, 1948 2 SHEETS--SHEET 2 \\"IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII Ill -llllllr nu -um My,

V INVENTOR. JEAN PATHUS LABOUR Patented Oct 21, 1952 Jean Pathus Labour, Washington, D. 0., assignor to Gasoline Research Industrial & Commercial Company, Inc., Panama, Panama, a company of the Republic of Panama Application April 9. 1948, Serial No. 20,160 In France August 13, 1947 7 Claims. (01. 251 -18) This invention relates to an apparatus for forming relatively small particles .of a liquid having a relatively high viscosity, whichparticles are of substantially uniform shape and size. Such an apparatus is particularly useful, for

example, in forming such particles ofthe emulsion obtained from dispersing liquid hydrocare bons within suitable aqueous colloidal solutions,

which emulsions are utilized. in various processes for the preparation of solids containing dis-' persed liquid hydrocarbons, such as gasoline. An apparatus for carrying out a process of this type has been disclosed, for instance, in the French patent application Prov. No. 540,686, filed in France on August 13, 1947, now Patent No.

952,045 dated April 25, 1949, in the names of the present applicant and Berthier. the same subject matter has also been disclosed in the United States atent application made in the name of the present applicant bearing Serial No.20,154, filed April 9, 1948, now Patent No.

2,515,126 dated July 11, 1950. a ,1

The apparatus disclosed in the above applicaa r 2 is particularly well adapted for use'where it is desired to operate a number of such devices with one common control member. 1

Still another object of the invention is to provide an obturator which is reliable and positive Substantially tion; and,

tions includes a solidifying mechanism which comprises among other components a plurality of containers disposed in vertical spaced relation. The uppermost container is adapted to receive the emulsion to be solidified and is equipped with a perforated bottom which is characterized as having suitable obturators associated with the perforations therein. These obturators are adapted to be operated by a common control mechanism so that drops of the emulsion may be formed and allowed to enter the second container which contains a bath of suitable solidifying reagent. No specific disclosure was made, however, in either of the above mentioned'applications of the exact construction of the type of obturator to be used. l

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide an obturator suitable for use in such an apparatus.

It is an additional object of this invention to provide an obturator of the character described which is useful, generally, in the formation of relatively small particles of uniform shape and size, of a liquid having a relatively high viscosity. i

It is a further object of this invention to provide an obturator which is particularly adapted to form such particles when disposed in close simple in both operation and construction and ments shown in Figure 4.

association with an. orifice in a plate member, or

-segments are shown in their maximumposition in its action and which can be utilized to produce uniform particles of varying shapes, such as cylindrical or spherical, with the same desirable accuracy.

"Further objects and advantages of this invention will become evident as the description proceeds and from an examination of the accompanying drawing which illustrates one embodiment of the invention and in which similar numerals refer to similar parts throughout the several views.

In the drawings- Fig. 1 is a plan view of one form of obturator embodying the subject matter of this invention,

the device being shown in the fully opened posi- Fig. 2 is a plan view of the obturator shown in Fig. l, the device being shown in the fully closed position.

Figure 3 is a somewhat fragmentary view in horizontal cross section of the obturator shown in Figure 1; l i

Figure 4 is a plan view of an alternative form of obturator embodying the invention, which has segmental plates the normal position which may be adjusted as desired;

Figure 5 is a view in elevation of one of the pivot posts carried by the freely movable seg- Referring now to Figs. 1 and 4, the obturator may include two fixed segments 10 and 12 upon which similar segments l4 and 16 are adapted to slide. These segments may be in the form of sectors of an annulus, as shown, which sectors are in concentric relation to the opening '19 in l r the bottom ll through which the liquid to be divided passes. The normally fixed segments 10a and lZa shown in Figure 4 are adjustable so that they may be moved toward or away. from each other and secured in any desired setting. This adjustment is accomplished by the set screw l3 disposed in the slot I5 in the tongue ll on each sector Illa and [2a as shownin Figure 4. These 3 of outward adjustment in Figure 4. Since the segments I and I2 and Illa and l2a and the overlapping segments l4 and I6 are so designed to form the substantially circular opening I8 when in the maximum positions shown in Figure 1 and Figure 4, respectively, any setting of the segments I0 and I2 which moves them inwardly toward each other will tend to restrict the size of the opening I8. By such adjustment of the position of the segments Illa and IZa, the size of the particles formed by the normal operation of the obturator, wherein segments I4 and It only are moved, may be varied.

I which the opposite ends of these arms are piv- Since the paths of movement of segments I4 and it may also be made capable of adjustment, as explained below, the size of the particles formed by the obturator may also be controlled in this manner. In other words, means may be provided for adjusting the outward movement of the segments I4 and 16 so that they will not be able to move to the maximum position shown in Fig. 1. Such a restriction'of the movement of the segments I4 and I6 will tend to restrict the size of the opening I8 as shown in Figure 4 and will, therefore, restrict the size of the particles formed.

The movement of the segments I4 and I6 may oted to move inwardly, or to the left, as the device is represented in Fig. 1. If the arm 46 is moved a suflicient distance in the manner described segments I4 and I6 will be moved into an overlapping relationship and will eventually assume the position shown in Fig. 2, which position completely closes the opening I8. In order I to insure the proper overlapping action of the segments; I4 and I6 when they are moved together the two segments are normally disposed in two parallel planes and the leading edges of each may be slightly beveled on opposite sides so that when the segments overlap one of these edges will be slightly displaced relative to the other. It should beunderstood, however, that the disposition of all of the various segments of the obturator is such that when the position shown in Fig.2 is assumed, they form a substantially impervious barrier to the. passage of a liquid.

Obviously when the 'arm 46 is moved in the opposite direction, starting from the position of adjustment shown in Fig. 2, the action described above will be reversed and, when the arm 46 has been returned to the position shown in Fig. 1, the various segments of the obturator will again be disposed substantially as shown in Fig. 1. This cycle may be repeated as often as desired so that by reciprocal movement of the arm 46 the opening I8 can be alternately opened and closed. If. the obturator is to be used in an installation such as that described in the applications above I identified, such a reciprocal movement of the to the bottom I I by the holding member 35. The

shaft 36 also has one end of the arm 36 pivotally mounted thereon, the opposite end of this arm being pivotally secured to one end of the segment IE on a pivot post 23.

In substantially the same fashion, one end of the arm 28 is pivotally secured to the other end of the segment I4 and the opposite end. of the arm 2% is pivotally secured to a shaft 38. The

shaft 38 is mounted to slide in the slot/It of the fixed supporting member 42 and one end of the arm 44 is pivotally mounted on the shaft 38, as

best shown in Figure 3, while its opposite end is pivotally secured to the end of segment I6 opposite the end to which the arm 36 is secured.

Such an arrangement allows the segments I4 and it to be simultaneously moved together, as shown in Fig. 2, by proper operation of the arm 46, which arm cooperates with the rod 20. If this movement of the arm 46 is to the right, with respect to its position shown in Fig. l, the rod 26 and the arms 22 and 24 will be moved in the same direction, carrying with them the segment I4. As the segment I4 moves inwardly or to the right as shown in Fig. 1 the ends of the two arms 26 and 26 secured to this segment are also moved to the right. Since the opposite ends of the arms 26 and 28 are secured to the shafts 30 and 38, respectively, which shafts are confined within the vertical slots 32 and'40, the movement to the right of the ends of the arms 26 and 28 secured to'the segment l4 will cause the opposite ends arm 46 will successively cut the thick or pasty liquid which is adapted to pass through the opening 18, and the liquid will therefore be divided into uniform sections of regular shape, which sections may then be permitted to fall into a suitable solidifying bath.

If desired, as shown in Figures 4 and 5, the pivotal mounting 23a for the ends of the arms 26a and 28a on thesegment I4 may be made so that the ends of the arms 24a and 22a may be secured at any desired point to the pivotal mountings 23a. Such an adjustment in the position .of these arms 24a and 22a with respect to the pivotal mounting 23a. and the segment I4 will produce modifications in the path of movement of the segments I4 and [6 for the same move ment of the arm 46, as mentioned above, which may be used as one method of controlling the size of the particles formed by the obturator. An opening 25 may be provided in the p s s 2311 to receive the arms 22a or 24a and a thumb screw 21 can be utilized to secure the arm 22a or 24a, in the selected position as shown in Figure 5.

Although the specific embodiment illustrated has been shown with only two normally mobile segments, it should be understood that there could be a greater number of such segments utilized. In addition, it should be specifically pointed out that obturators of the construction disclosed are particularly adapted to being operated by a common control mechanism. The arm 46, for instance, could be one of a plurality of similar arms secured to still another arm dis-' posed substantially at right angles to the-arm 46. Such an arrangement might be desirable,

for instance, in the type of apparatus described I in the above identified applications.

In the drawing and specification, there has been set forth a preferred embodiment of the invention, and although specific terms are employed, they. are used in a generic and descriptive si a sense emyaiie not-"roe purposes of -limitation} the scope of the invention being defined in the claims."

1. An obturator for liquids having a relatively high viscositypomprising' a pair of'movable segments.normallyldisposed inspaced opposing relation to each other on a common-axis, a pair of normally fixedsegmentsalso normally disposed in spaced opposin "relation toeaoh other in a comm-(airplane on a commo'ii' axis normal to said first named axis,- said first named segments each normally overlapping bothqof said second named segments so that all four or said segments form a part'ition normally having ,a central opening therein; and means for moving said first named pair of segments into overlapping relation so as to close said opening comprising a thrust transmitting member operatively secured to one of said movable segments and a toggle linkage pivotally interconnecting each pair of ends of said movable segments, the central pivot point of said toggle linkage being adapted to move in a fixed track so that movement of one such segment is therefore transmitted to the other segment.

2. An obturator for liquids having a relatively high viscosity comprising a pair of movable segments normally disposed in spaced opposing relation to each other on a common axis, a pair of normally fixed segments also normally disposed in spaced opposing relation to each other in a gamma high-viscosity comprising apairioi movablesc common plane on a common axis normal to said M first named axis, said first named segmentseach normally'overlapping both of said second named segments so that all four of said segments form a partition normally having a central opening interconnecting each pair of ends of said movable segments, the central pivot point of said toggle linkage being adapted to move in a fixed track so that movement of one such segment is therefore transmitted to the other segment, and means for securing said thrust transmitting member to one of said movable segments at a selected point to vary the maximum size of said opening formed by said segments. I

3. An obturator for liquids having a relatively high viscosity comprising a pair of movable segments normally disposed in spaced opposing relation to each other on a common axis, a pair of normally fixed segments also normally disposed in spaced opposing relation to each other in a common plane on a common axis normal to said first named axis, said first named segments each normally overlapping both of said second named segments so that all 'four of said segments form a partition normally having a central opening therein, means for moving said first named pair of segments into overlapping relation so as to close said opening comprising a thrust transmitting member operatively secured to one of said movable segments and a toggle linkage pivotally interconnecting each pair of ends of said movable segments, the central pivot point of said toggle linkage being adapted to move in a fixed track so that movement of one such segment is therefore transmitted to the other segment, and

means'for selectively positioning said normally fixed segments so as to vary the maximum size of said opening formed by said segments.

4. An obturator for liquids having a relatively ments normally disposed in spaced opposing rela' tion to each other on a common axis; a pair not i normally fixed segments also normallyudisposed in spaced opposing relation to each othspinta common 'plane' on a common axis normal to said first named :axis, said first named segments each normally overlapping both of said second named.

segments so that all iour of said segments form a partition normally having a central opening therein, means for moving saidfirst named-pairof segments into overlapping relation so .asuto close said opening comprising athrust transmit-e ting member operativelysecured to one of said movable segments and. a, toggle linkage pivotally interconnecting each pairofends of said movable segments, the central pivot point of said toggle linkage being adapted to move in a fixed track so 5. An obturator for liquids having a relatively high viscosity comprisinga pair of movable segments in the form of sectors of an annulus normally disposed in spaced opposing relation to each other on a common axis, a pair of normally fixed segments also in the form of sectors of an annulus and being normally disposed in spaced opposing relation to each other in a commonplane on a common axis normal to said first named axis, said first named segments each normally overlapping both of said second named segments so that all four of said segments form a partition substantially in the form of an annulus normally having a central opening therein substantially in the form of a circle, and means for moving said first named pair of segments into overlapping relation so as to close said opening comprising a thrust transmitting member operatively secured to one of said movable segments and a toggle linkage pivotally interconnecting each pair of ends of said movable segments, the central pivot point of said toggle linkage being adapted to move in a fixed track so that movement of one such segment is therefore transmitted to the other segment. i

6. An obturator for liquids having a relatively high viscosity comprising a pair of movable segments in the form of sectors of an annulus normally disposed in spaced opposing relation to each other on a common axis, a pair of normally fixed segments also in the form of sectors of an annulus and being normally disposed in spaced opposing relation to each other in a common plane on a common axis normal to said first named axis, said first named segments each normally overlapping both of said second named segments so that all four of said segments form a partition substantially in the form of an annulus normally having a central opening therein substantially in the form of a circle, means for moving said first named pair of segments into overlapping relation so as to close said opening including a thrust transmitting member, and means for securing said thrust transmitting member to one of said movable segments at a selected point to vary the maximum size of said opening formed by said segments.

7. An obturator for liquids having a relatively aemgrsez mallyl disposed in spaced opposing relation toeach other on a common axis, a pair of normally fixed segments also in the form of sectors of an annulus and being normally disposed in spaced opposing relation to each other in a common plane on a common axis normal to said first named axis, said first named segments each normally overlapping both of said second named segments so that all four, of said segments form a partition substantially in the form of an annulus normally having a central opening therein substantially in the form of a circle, means for moving said first named pair of segments into overlapping relation so as to close said opening, and means for selectively positioning said normally fixed segments so as to vary the 8 1 maximum size of said opening formed by said segments.

JEAN PATHUS LABOUR.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,595,657 Halloran Aug. 10, 1926 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 15,426 Great Britain of 1901

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1595657 *Nov 3, 1922Aug 10, 1926Halloran Patrick JVariable air inlet for pressure air-cooling systems
GB190115426A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3025882 *Dec 3, 1958Mar 20, 1962Deere & CoAir inlet control for fans and the like
US3787022 *May 22, 1972Jan 22, 1974Wilcox CIris check valve and use thereof
US4395427 *May 12, 1981Jul 26, 1983Werner Lehara, Inc.Method and apparatus for depositing dough on a conveyor
US4532961 *Nov 22, 1982Aug 6, 1985Fisher Controls International, Inc.Bidirectional disc throttling valve
US5895028 *Sep 23, 1997Apr 20, 1999Uop LlcSingle disc slide valve with center biased flow
US20110303864 *Aug 27, 2009Dec 15, 2011Keun Sang LeeIris-shaped variable valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification251/212, 251/280, 251/228, 251/300
International ClassificationF16K3/03, F16K3/02
Cooperative ClassificationF16K3/03
European ClassificationF16K3/03