Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2615180 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 28, 1952
Filing dateMay 7, 1949
Priority dateMay 7, 1949
Publication numberUS 2615180 A, US 2615180A, US-A-2615180, US2615180 A, US2615180A
InventorsWoller Edward E
Original AssigneeSimmons Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spring assembly
US 2615180 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. E. WOLLER SPRING ASSEMBLY Oct. 28, 1952 2 SHEETS-SHEET l E. E. WOLLER SPRING ASSEMBLY Oct. 28, 1952 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 Filed May '7. 1949 fraz/@ni Patented Oct. 28, 1952 `SPRING ASSEMBLY Edward E. Woller, Kenosha, Wis., assignor to Simmons Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware ApplcationMay r7, 1949, Serial No. 91,889

4 Claims. 1

This invention relates to the construction of a series of pockets in superimposed layers of fabric, each of which pockets encases a spring coiland sections of which pocket-encased springs are varranged side by side to form mattresses orcushions of the so-called Marshall type. Lengths .or sections of `these pocket-encased springsare gen-- erally secured side by side with .thespring f, axes parallel to provide a mattress or a cushion of the desired proportions. These sectionsare general-ly formed by inserting the compressed spring ycoils into folded-over fabric which isstitched along one lateral edge and transversely between the spring coils. After the stitching, the spring coils are released and adjusted in eachof the pockets, After assembling sections of pocketed springs into a mattress, the springs of alternate rows, -as

a rule, are tied together by cords looped over the end convolutions of the springs and extend transversely across the mattress or cushion from the border section or length on one side to that on the other.

Because the transverse stitching, which forms the pockets, in these superimposed .fabric layers, extends entirely across the strip, adjacent pockets are attached throughout their entire length. Hence, under certain conditions, .the local depression of any one spring has a tendency to exert an undesirable side pull upon the springs on oppositesides of the depressedspring.

The main object of this invention is to provide an improved construction of mattresses or cushions of the inner-springtype whichcpermits any spring to be 'depressed a-material distance without undesirably disturbing the adjacent springs.

In the accompanying drawings:

Fig. 1 is lapartly sectional and partly end elevation of a Marshall-type mattress, .the interior of `which is composed' of fabric-pocketed coils ernbodying this invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary, elevational View of a section of a preferred form of-pocket construction embodying this invention;

Fig. 3 is a transverse sectionaljviewof the same, taken on the line 3-3'0f Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a View, similar toFig. 2, of a modified form of pocket construction embodyingrthis invention; j

Fig. 5 is a transverse, sectional view takenon the line 5 5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a diagrammatic perspective view-.of .a section of folded fabric wherein the transverse stitching for forming the Apocketsernibodies the preferred form ofthis invention;

Fig. 7 is a similar view wherein the transverse stitching embodies a modied form of this invention;

Fig. 8 is a plan View of a fragment of the assembled `pocketed springs showing the manner in which alternate springs are tied together transversely of the spring-encased sections which form the mattress shown in Fig. 1; and

Fig. 9 is an enlarged transverse sectional detail taken on the line .9 9 of Fig. 8.

Mattressor cushion-forming -sections of pocketed springs, embodying this invention, comprise superimposed layers or plies of fabric I0 stitched together to form pockets II, in each of which pockets is encased a spring coil I2 and between'which pockets the fabric I0 is severed, as shown at I3, a predetermined distance inwardly from each lateral edge. The stitching of the fabric I0 and the forming, insertion, and ultimate positioning of the spring coils I2 in the pockets I I is effected on a machine of the type Vshown in Patent No. 1,813,993, altered, of course, to secure the form of stitching and slitting embodying this invention.

The fabric IU is usually cotton sheeting. A strip of such fabric, after being folded upon itself to provide superimposed layers, is stitched at I4 along one lateral edge and at I5at transverse intervals to form the pockets I-I (see Fig. 4).

The spring Icoils I2 are preferably of the barrel type construction, as clearly shownin the drawings. Accordingly, the endconvolutions are slightly smaller in diameter than the intermediate convolut-ions. For this reason, there is slightly more fabric between contiguousfpockets I I adjacent the lateral portions of the fabric than is provided with the cylindrical type of springs.

In a `construction embodying the preferred form of this invention, there is a double line `of the transverse stitching i I 5, as most clearly shown in. Figs. 2, 3, and 6. Such parallel stitching `results in the formation of lnarrow strips IBof fabric between the parallel lines of stitching I5 intermediate each of the pockets II.

.In the modied form, as best shown in Figs.I '4, 5, and 7, there is but a single line or rowof transverse stitching I5 extending entirely across the strip and separating the adjacent pockets II. l-Iowever, a second line I'I of transversesstitching 1s extended a predetermined distanceainwardly from the opposite lateral edges of thefab'ricadjacent and substantially Vparallel to thesingle line I5 of thelstitches. lThis results in the formation of a narrow strip 4l B'v of fabric betweenconthe depressed coil. For that reason the ends of the coils directly contiguous to a depressed coil will not be disturbed but will remain horizontallydisposed until the force causing the depression' of a spring coil has moved its end inwardly of the inner terminus of the slits I3.

The transversely extending lines of stitching I5 in the preferred form of the invention, and the lines I5 and II in the modied form, are preferably disposed as close to one another as is practicable to permit the strips I6 nad I6 to be slit without opening the adjacent pockets. Furthermore, the size of the barrel-shaped spring coils I2 relative to the pockets is desirably such that the pocket forming strips tautly enclose the coils and tend to assume the outline of the latter, the fabric being drawn inwardly between the convolutions, as is clearly shown in Figures l, 2, 4 and 9. As a result of this stretching of the pocket-forming strips, the inter-pocket connecting strip I6 of the preferred form is deformed, as is the single transversely extending line of stitching in the modified form of the invention,

so that in both forms of the invention the intermediate convolutions of the adjacent barrelshaped coils intermesh (see Figures 2 and 4) while the end convolutions remain spaced apart. With this arrangement, adjacent coils in a single row or series are iiexibly yet compactly associated, and yet the independent coil action permitted by partial severance of the pocket-forming strips between the coils, is not impaired. These spring coil series are capable of being closely assembled, as will subsequently appear, with like series or rows to form a dense and compact spring assembly.

Sections or lengths of these fabric-pocketed spring coils are arranged side by side in staggered rows in the manner indicated in Fig. 8, so that the intermediate convolutions of any one spring coil intermesh with the intermediate convolutions of the two adjacent coils in the rows or sections on either side. However, the end convolutions of juxtaposed coils in adjacent rows, like adjacent coils in a single row or section, remain spaced apart to retain their individual freedom of action. The assembled sections ultimately are surrounded, top, bottom, and sides, with the usual layers of tufted padding I8, as most clearly shown in Fig. 1. Before the padding is put on, the end convolutions of certain of the alternate spring coils I l2 are connected by ties I9, these ties being spaced at suitable intervals along the rows. Such a tie is generally in the form of a cord. As indicated at 20, Fig. 8, one end of a tie I 9 is knotted around an end convolution of each of the coils along one lateral edge of the assembly and extended across the mattress transversely to the row of pocketed coils along the opposite lateral edge of the assembly. The tie is looped around the end convolution of each coil in the alternate intermediate sections parallel to the lateral edges, as indicated at 2|, Fig. 8. At the opposite edge of the assembly the ties I9 are knotted around the end convolutions of the opposite lateral row of coils.

Variations and modifications in the details of structure and arrangement of the parts may be resorted to within the spirit and coverage of the appended claims.

Iclaim:

1. A connected series of fabric-pocketed spring coils for mattress formation comprising a strip of textile fabric formed of two fabric plies, one overlying the other, said strip having parallel longitudinal edges, said plies being connected together along both of said longitudinal edges, at least one of said connections comprising stitching extending along and adjacent to one edge of said strip, equally spaced, parallel lines of stitching extending transversely across said strip and connecting said plies at spaced intervals thereby forming a series of contiguous pockets between said plies, other lines of stitching extending inwardly from each of said edges a predetermined distance and substantially parallel to and closely adjacent to said spaced parallel lines of stitching, and a spring coil on each of said pockets, said coils having intermediate convolutions of greater diameter than the end convolutions and being of suiiicient size to deform said pockets to draw the walls thereof inwardly between the convolutions, the intermediate convolutions of the spring in each pocket intermeshing with the intermediate convolutions of the springs in the immediately adjacent pockets while the end convolutions of the springs remain spaced apart, said strip having a series of equally spaced slits extending from each edge inwardly for a limited distance, the space between each of said other lines of stitching and the adjacent one of said spaced parallel transverse lines of stitching having one of said slits extending into such space.

2. A connected series of fabric-pocketed spring coils for mattress formation comprising a strip of textile fabric formed of two fabric plies, one overlying the other, said strip having parallel longitudinal edges, said plies being connected together along both of said longitudinal edges, at least one of said connections comprising stitching extending along and adjacent to one edge of said strip, equally spaced pairs of parallel lines of stitching extending transversely across said strip and connecting said plies at spaced intervals to form a series of contiguous pockets between said plies, and a spring coil in each of said pockets, said coils having intermediate convolutions of greater diameter than the end convolutions and being of sufficient size to deform said pockets to draw the walls thereof inwardly between the convolutions, the intermediate convolutions of the spring in each pocket intermeshing with the intermediate convolutions of the springs in the immediately adjacent pockets while the end convolutions of the springs remain spaced apart, said strip having a series of equally spaced slits extending from each edge inwardly for a limited distance, the space between the lines of each of said pairs having one of said slits extending from each edge into such space.

3. A connected series of fabric-pocketed spring coils for mattress formation comprising a strip of textile fabric formed of two fabric plies, one overlying the other, said strip having parallel longitudinal edges, said plies being connected together along both of said longitudinal edges, at least one of said connections comprising stitching extending along and adjacent to one edge of said strip, parallel lines of stitching extending transversely across said strip and connecting said plies at spaced intervals to form a series of contiguous pockets of equal width between said plies, and a spring coil in each of said pockets, said coils having intermediate convolutions 0i greater diameter than the end convolutions and being of sucient size to deform said pockets to draw the walls thereof inwardly between the convolutions, the intermediate convolutions of the spring in each pocket intermeshing with the intermediate convolutions of the springs in the immediately adjacent pockets while the end convolutions of the springs remain spaced apart, and said strip having a series of equally spaced slits, said slits extending inwardly from each edge adjacent to, and slightly beyond the extremity of, one of said parallel lines of stitching.

4. A spring assembly for the formation of mattresses and the like, comprising juxtaposed rows of fabric-pocketed spring coils, each of said rows comprising a length of textile fabric strip formed of two fabric plies, one overlying the other, said strip having parallel longitudinal edges, said plies being connected together along both of said longitudinal edges, at least one of said connections comprising stitching extending along and adjacent to one edge of said'strip, spaced parallel lines of stitching extending transversely across said strip and connecting said plies together at spaced intervals to form a series of contiguous pockets of equal width between said plies, and a spring coil in each of said pockets, said coils having intermediate convolutions of greater diameter than the end convolutions and being of sufficient size to deform said pockets to draw the walls thereof inwardly between the convolutions, the intermediate convolutions of the spring in each pocket intermeshing with the intermediate convolution of the springs in the immediately adjacent pockets `while the end convolutions of the springs remain spaced apart, alternate rows being connected together at intervals disposed longitudinally thereof, and said strip having a series of equally spaced slits, said slits extending inwardly from each edge adjacent to, and slightly beyond the extremity of, one of said parallel lines of stitching.

EDWARD E. WOLLER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,248,384 Lewis Nov. 13, 1918 1,950,770 Bayer Mar. 13, 1934 2,048,979 Trutto et al July 28, 1936

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1248384 *Jul 13, 1916Nov 27, 1917Newton Mfg CompanyElectric wall-switch.
US1950770 *Jan 3, 1931Mar 13, 1934Simmons CoInner spring construction for matresses and the like
US2048979 *Mar 24, 1934Jul 28, 1936Burton Dixie CorpSpring cushion assembly
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2715435 *Apr 12, 1954Aug 16, 1955Rymland Murray JSpring cushion assembly for upholstery
US2805429 *Oct 21, 1954Sep 10, 1957Simmons CoMattress manufacture
US2862214 *Oct 4, 1956Dec 2, 1958Marspring CorpCushion or mattress construction and method of manufacture
US3099021 *May 28, 1957Jul 30, 1963Englander Co IncFoam mattress
US4234983 *Oct 2, 1978Nov 25, 1980Simmons CompanyThermally welded spring pockets
US5699998 *Feb 1, 1994Dec 23, 1997Zysman; MiltonManufacture of pocket spring assemblies
US6315275Mar 22, 1999Nov 13, 2001Furniture Row Technologies, LlcPocket spring assembly and methods
US6467240 *Jul 27, 2001Oct 22, 2002Furniture Row Technologies, LlcPocket spring assembly and methods
US6698166Oct 8, 2002Mar 2, 2004Springquilt Industries Ltd.Pocket spring assembly and methods
US8136187Jun 19, 2008Mar 20, 2012L&P Property Management CompanySlow acting pocketed spring core and method of manufacturing same
US8176608Sep 8, 2009May 15, 2012L&P Property Management CompanyMethod of manufacturing slow acting pocketed spring core
US8266745Apr 26, 2011Sep 18, 2012L&P Property Management CompanySlow acting pocketed spring core having fill material inside pockets
US8307523Nov 18, 2011Nov 13, 2012L&P Property Management CompanyMethod of making slow acting pocketed spring core
US8464381May 16, 2011Jun 18, 2013L&P Property Management CompanySlow acting pocketed spring core having fibrous material and sheets glued to pockets
US8474078Dec 6, 2010Jul 2, 2013L&P Property Management CompanySlow acting pocketed spring core having cushioning material
US8484784Mar 2, 2011Jul 16, 2013L&P Properly Management CompanySlow acting pocketed spring core having fibrous material glued to pockets
US8918934 *Apr 16, 2013Dec 30, 2014Otis Bed Manufacturing Company, Inc.Linked coil mattress assembly
US20130276239 *Apr 16, 2013Oct 24, 2013Otis Bed Manufacturing Company, Inc.Linked coil mattress assembly
CN1893861BDec 10, 2004Sep 7, 2011谢恩菲耶德拉尔股份公司Separated pocket spring mattress with cut through string, and a method and apparatus for prodcution of such mattress
WO2005055771A1 *Dec 10, 2004Jun 23, 2005Nils Eric StjernaSeparated pocket spring mattress with cut through string, and a method and apparatus for prodcution of such mattress
WO2008145185A1 *May 30, 2007Dec 4, 2008Cesare PetrolatiA spring tube and a spring pack for spring mattresses
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/720
International ClassificationA47C27/06, A47C27/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47C27/064
European ClassificationA47C27/06D1