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Publication numberUS2615693 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 28, 1952
Filing dateApr 15, 1947
Priority dateApr 15, 1947
Publication numberUS 2615693 A, US 2615693A, US-A-2615693, US2615693 A, US2615693A
InventorsMatirko Chester A
Original AssigneeBasic Refractories Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for feeding ground materials
US 2615693 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 28, 1952 c, A. MATIRKO APPARATUS FOR FEEDING GROUND MATERIALS Filed April 15, 1947 o. MK R mw A m A k m u QMJU ATTOE/VEYJ.

Patented Oct. 28, 1952 APPARATUS FOR FEEDING, GROUND MATERIALS Chester A. Matirko, Tifiin, Ohio, assignor to Basic Refractories, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio, 2. corporation of Ohio Application April 15, 1947, Serial No. 741,670,

This invention relates to apparatus for projecting ground materials by fluid pressure, as in an ejector stream; and it is among the objects of the invention to provide a simple and reliable construction capable of handling a wide-variety of pulverulent or grandular materials, and with such pressure as desired. Other objects and advantages will appear from the following description.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, the invention, then, comprises the features hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims, the following description and the annexed drawing setting forth in detail certain illustrative embodiments of the invention, these being indicative, however, of but a few of the various ways in which the principle of the invention may be employed.

In said annexed drawing:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view, partly in section, showing an embodi ent of the invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged s ale elevationai detail of the closure operating'mechanism, the closure being shown in section;

Fig. 3 is a further enlarged; detail" sectional view of a portion of said operating mechanism;

Fig. 4 is a transverse sectional view taken on a plane substantially indicated by line IV-IV, Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged scale sectional detail of the outlet and its valve control; and

Fig. 6 is an enlarged scale fragmentary sectional view of the liquid inlet on the nozzle conduit.

The construction includes in general a container 2 with feed-inlet 3 at the upper portion, and an outlet below controlled by a valve 4 which leads to an ejector chamber 5. The inlet is controlled by a closure 6 which'is opened inwardly, and to a position entirely out of the path of material being charged in through'the opening; 3. Pivoted at I in a convenient location near the inlet opening 3 is an arm 8 which carries the closure 6, being loosely pivoted thereto so asto allow some freedom of independent swinging movement on the part of the closure element and thereby assure accurate seating against the opening when the closure is swung into place.

The amount of independent swinging motion by 9* Claims. (Cl. 259-451) arm 8 is an extension l2 which, being rigid with the'arm 8, is connected by a link I3 to a toggle operating means embodying a hand wheel H and stub shaft I5 mounted in asuitable bracket IE on the container 2. To the stub shaft I5 there is secured an arm IT to which is pivotally connected the member 18 of the link-system IS. The member I8 may have a cylindrical end portion 20, within which the end of the member I3 may be guided, and a nut 22 on the end thereof may confine a compression spring 23 which thrusts also against the .cap 24 which is screw-threadedly attached to the cylindrical member 20. Thereby, the link system including elements I3 and I8 may permit 'suliicient elongation and shortening to throw through dead center, in a toggling arrangement involving the arm I1 and the link system I3, and locking is thus effected in a particularly secure manner. Asindicated in Fig. 2, the arms 8, I2 and I! are in the positions shown by solid lines when theclosure is in its normal position, but when opened, the lever arm I2 is swung up to the dot-dash line Ho, and the lever I1 is swung'up to the dot line I la, the closure being turned back into a position approximately vertical beyond the line of the opening. Thus, material poured into the container does not strike or abrade the closure element.

For control of the valve 4, a hand-operating lever 26 is arranged adjacent the hand Wheel H, the lever 26 beingsufliciently bent to curve under the bracket I6 and be easily accessible, and being secured to a rocker shaft 21 which is mounted in the container, and which has a lever arm 28 to raise and lower the valve rod 29. Suitable lost motion means may be interposed, such as slots 30 in the bifurcated end of the arm cooperating withopposite pins 3i on the valve rod 29. The valve rod may be guided above in a long bushing '32 carried by the top of the container. Desirably, the container has a conical bottom which converges to its outlet, and the'ball valve 4 seats therein. The valve is preferably of slightly resilient material, as rubber, synthetic or natural, and desirably loaded with fine metallic or mineral filler, such as to afford considerable firmness, along with the resiliency favoring accurate setting. I

In the'chamber 5 below the valve 4, a fluid jet nozzle 35 is arranged opposite the outlet opening 36 which may connect by a suitable hose 31 or the like to a discharge nozzle 38. The chamber 5 provides clearance around the nozzle 35 through the entire 360", and by'a suitable tapered and removable steel throat 40 leading to the outlet 36, an even and unimpeded outflow is attained. The nozzle 35 may be fed by any desired fluid, but usually, air is employed, and the feed pipe 4| may be conveniently arranged along the outside of the container and have a control valve 42 above. The point of attachment of an air supply hose for example leading thereto may be at any desired location, above or below, being illustrated by the connection 43.

In instances where it is desired to introduce a liquid into the stream of pulverulent material, the liquid inlet 45 on the nozzle 38 may be brought into use. This is in the form of a series of radial inlets 46 to the nozzle lumen, as supplied from the surrounding collar member 45, and which is fed in turn by a small conduit 41 leading from a suitable hose connection to the source of liquid supply. With a control valve 48 in a convenient.

location, the supply of liquid can be controlled when and as desired.

Conveniently located pressure gauges 50, may be arranged to show the feed pressure on the nozzle jet 35, and the pressure within the container respectively, and a conveniently located valve 52 may release the pressure from the container when the closure is to be unseated.

With the construction as thus set out, granular or pulverulent materials can be jetted, such that for instance with furnace lining refractory material, repairs or replacement of full linings may be conveniently accomplished; and similarly, cementitious material such as Portland cement mixtures with aggregate, etc., can be placed. Water or solutions or other liquids can be added at the nozzle as may be desired.

Other modes of applying the principle of the invention may be employed, change being made as regards the detail described, provided the features stated in any of the following claims, or the equivalent of such, be employed.

I therefore particularly point out and distinct- 1y claim as my invention:

1. In apparatus of the character described, means for pressure-projecting granular material, comprising a portable wheel-supported conical bottom container with upper inlet and bottom outlet, means for maintaining a pressure-differential between the inside and outside of the container, including a closure for the inlet movable inwardly, a closure for said outlet including a resilient ball operating into a tapered seat, an axially movable rod carrying said ball, a tubular guide for said rod dependent from the top of the container, a hand-operated rock shaft with arm and lost-motion connection to said rod, a nozzle chamber adjacent and under said ball, a fluid jet nozzle projecting in said chamber, a discharge opening opposite said nozzle, a discharge conduit including a hose section leading from said opening, and a valve-controlled liquid inlet on said conduit including a small chamber surrounding the conduit for liquid supplied thereto, and means including openings from said chamber into the conduit.

2. In apparatus of the character described. means for pressure-projecting granular material, comprising a portable wheel-supported conical bottom container with upper inlet and bottom outlet, means for maintaining a pressure-differential between the inside and outside of the container, including a closure for the inlet movable inwardly, a closure for said outlet including a resilient ball operating into a tapered seat, an axially movable rod carrying said ball, aguide for said rod in the upper part of the container, a. hand-operated rock shaft with arm and lostmotion connection to said rod, a nozzle chamber adjacent said ball, a fluid jet nozzle projecting in said chamber, a discharge opening opposite said nozzle, a discharge conduit including a flexible section leading from said opening, and a liquid inlet on said conduit including a small chamber surrounding the conduit for liquid supplied thereto, and means including openings from said chamber into the conduit.

3. In apparatus of the character described, means for pressure-projecting granular material, comprising a portable wheel-supported conical bottom container with upper inlet and bottom outlet, means for maintaining a pressure-dinerential between the inside and outside of the container, including a closure for the inlet, a closure for said outlet including a resilient ball operating into a tapered seat, an axially movable rod carrying said ball, a hand-operated rock shaft with arm and lost-motion connection to said rod, a nozzle chamber adjacent said ball, a fluid jet nozzle projecting in said chamber, a discharge opening opposite said nozzle, a discharge conduit leading from said opening including a flexible section, and a liquid inlet on said conduit including a small chamber surrounding the conduit for liquid supplied thereto, and means including openings from said chamber into the conduit.

4. In apparatus of the character described, a portable wheel-supported conical bottom container with upper inlet and bottom outlet, means for maintaining a pressure-differential between the inside and outside of the container, including a closure for the inlet, a closure for said outlet of the container including a ball operating into a tapered seat, means for seating and unseating said ball, a nozzle chamber adjacent said ball, a fluid-jet nozzle projecting in said chamber, a discharge opening opposite said nozzle, and means including conduit leading from said opening and including a flexible section.

5. In apparatus of the character described, a portable wheel-supported conical bottom container with upper inlet and bottom outlet, means for maintaining a pressure-difierential between the inside and outside of the container, including a closure for the inlet, a closure for said outlet of the container including a, ball operating into a tapered seat, means for moving said ball, a nozzle chamber adjacent said ball, a fluid-jet nozzle projecting in said chamber, a discharge opening opposite said nozzle, means including conduit leading from said opening, and a liquid inlet on said conduit.

6. In apparatus of the character described, a container with upper inlet and bottom outlet, means for maintaining a pressure-difierential between the inside and outside of the container, including a closure for the inlet, a closure for the outlet including a ball operating into a tapered seat, an axially movable rod carrying said ball, a hand-operated rock shaft with arm and lost-motion connection to said rod, a nozzle chamber adjacent said ball, a fluid-jet nozzle projecting in said chamber, means including discharge opening opposite said nozzle, a conduit leading from said opening, and a liquid inlet on said conduit including a small chamber surrounding the conduit for a liquid supply thereto, and means including openings from said chamber into the conduit.

7. In apparatus of the character described, a container with upper inlet and bottom outlet, means for maintaining a pressure-differential between the inside and outside of the container, including a closure for the inlet, and a closure for the outlet of the container including a resilient ball operating into a tapered seat, means for moving said ball to and from such seat, a nozzle chamber adjacent said ball, a fluid jet nozzle projecting in said chamber, means including discharge opening opposite said nozzle, and a conduit leading from said opening.

8. In apparatus of the character described, a container with upper inlet and bottom outlet, means for maintaining a pressure-(inferential between the inside and outside of the container, including a closure for the inlet, a closure for the outlet of the container including a valve, a discharge chamber adjacent said valve, a fluidjet nozzle projecting in said chamber, means including discharge opening opposite said nozzle, a conduit leading from said opening, and a liquidinlet on said conduit.

9. In apparatus of the character described, a container with upper inlet and bottom outlet, means for maintaining a pressure-differential between the inside and outside of the container, including a closure for the inlet, and a closure for the outlet including a slightly resilient ball operating into a tapered seat, an axially movable rod carrying said ball, and a hand-operated rock shaft with arm and pin and slot connection to said shaft, a nozzle chamber adjacent said ball, a fluid jet nozzle projecting in said chamber, and means including discharge opening opposite said nozzle.

CHESTER A. MATIRKO.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1370593 *Jan 5, 1918Mar 8, 1921Fred E KlingFeed mechanism
US1478865 *Mar 5, 1923Dec 25, 1923Weber Engineering CorpMachine for injecting plastic materials
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US1953091 *Jun 8, 1932Apr 3, 1934Gustave Edward WestbergConcrete conveying and mixing machine
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2793074 *Feb 7, 1956May 21, 1957Lawn Gro IncFertilizer container and dispenser
US3018021 *Mar 9, 1959Jan 23, 1962Sun Oil CoShipping container
US3123407 *Jun 1, 1961Mar 3, 1964BasicValve v-
US3188145 *Mar 20, 1963Jun 8, 1965Strong William AConcrete placement machine
US3464676 *Oct 9, 1967Sep 2, 1969Lewis CoxMixer-distributor for dry cementitous material
US3625403 *Apr 4, 1969Dec 7, 1971Ciba Geigy CorpAerosol-type dispenser for dispensing a powdered material
US4187758 *Jan 3, 1978Feb 12, 1980The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyBomb container with gravity-closed internal door
US5451104 *Aug 6, 1992Sep 19, 1995Crc-Chemical Research Company Ltd.Method and apparatus for producing foam
US6425529 *Aug 25, 1999Jul 30, 2002Frank G. ReinschControlled injection of dry material into a liquid system
USRE41267Jul 28, 2004Apr 27, 2010Rosen's Inc.Controlled injection of dry material into a liquid system
WO2001014244A1 *Aug 25, 2000Mar 1, 2001John A LattingControlled injection of dry material into a liquid stream
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/11, 417/190, 239/431, 220/244, 222/608, 222/263, 222/394, 239/379, 406/132, 222/510
International ClassificationE04F21/02, E04F21/12
Cooperative ClassificationE04F21/12
European ClassificationE04F21/12