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Publication numberUS2615770 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 28, 1952
Filing dateJul 10, 1951
Priority dateJul 10, 1951
Publication numberUS 2615770 A, US 2615770A, US-A-2615770, US2615770 A, US2615770A
InventorsCurtis Philip C
Original AssigneeCurtis Philip C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knockdown table
US 2615770 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 28, 1952 P. c. CURTIS KNOCKDOWN TABLE Filed July 10, 1951 zls.

Patented Oct. 28, 1952 UNITED STATES PATENT orrlcs KNOCKDOWN Philip C. Curtis, Scottsdale, Ariz'; Application July 10, 1951, Serial No. 235,956

This invention relates to the construction of household furniture and the like. More particularly it is concerned with providing a novel knockdown table wherein the several component parts of the table can be quickly and cheaply manufactured and which are so fabricated that they can be quickly and easily interlocked and joined together without the use of external rastening elements such as nails, bolts, screws, glue or the like.

Past efforts that have been madeto provide inexpensive, simply constructed knockdown tables, from materials readily available and without the use of external fastening elements such as bolts, nails, rivets, glue, etc, have not met with success for one or more reasons.

Whenever such table constructions were devised, they were usually comprised of parts having such an intricate and complex design that easy and cheap fabrication of the same was impossible. Instead expensive machinery had to be devised to fabricate the parts and assembly of the parts upon fabrication required more than ordinary skill. I e

Such tables were also usually made of metal, since other materials such as plywood and the like were not considered to have the inher'ent strength and rigidity required to providesatisfactory strong interlocking parts which; could obviate the necessity of using external fastening elements, and yet provide a satisfactory table structure which could withstand normal wear and abuse.

These are but a few of the factors which made the manufacture and sale of knockdown tables assembled without the use of nails, screws and the like expensive and the commercial exploitation thereof unfeasible.

it has been found, however, that byproperly designing the several partsof the table so that each part suitably interlocks with another part, a rigid and exceptionally sturdy table is pro vided, which can be readily and cheaply manufactured. In addition, the table of the instant invention contains parts which are so easy'to assemble that even a child is capable of putting them together. The overall table design of the instant invention also possesses such inherent strength and rigidity that the severaL-parts thereof can all be made of plywood or like mate: rials without any sacrifice of structural strength.

The simple design of the parts provides for easy and quick assembly. The several parts before assembly of the table and after the dismantlement thereof can be convenientl placed 2 Claims. (01. 311- 35) 2 in a siren package or container which can then be stored while using but a'minimu'in amount Of space. Never at any time need One WOlIS? about nails, screws, glue, clamps, etc.', which'aie small items that can easily be lost, and the use,

of which is critical inmost table constructions. I Another advantage inherent in the design of the instant table is that no tools, not even a hammer or screw driver, are required to put the parts together. i

It is a primary ob ect of this invention therefble t0, provide "anovel knockdown table assembly having interlocking parts, which suppl their own fastening elements in and of themselves. Another object of this invention is to provide a novel knockdown table assembly of exceptional strength and rigidity while being inanufactii'red from a minimum amount of parts.

A further object of this invention is to provide a novel knockdown table assembly having parts which can be cheaply and readily manufeatured. v

A iurther object of this invention is to provides. novel knockdown table assembly which has such inherent strength and rigidity because of the design of the several parts that it can be fabricated from DIYWOOd.

Another object of "this invention is to provide a novel table assembly having parts which can be easily assembledwithout the need for special tools, or special skill on the part of the person assembling the table.

A further object of this invention is to provide a novel table having parts which before assemblage or after dismantlenient can be conveniently stored in a minimum amount of space or in a small package during shipment from one place to another.

A final object of this invention is to provide a novel table construction wherein the use of glue, nails, screws, rivets, bolts, etc., can be dispensed with.

These and other objects will become more apparent by reference to the following detailed description, when taken in conjunction with the appended drawings wherein:

Figure l is a perspective view of the table of the instant invention;

Figure 2 is a sectional view of the table disclosed in Figure 1 when taken along lines 2-2 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a bottom plan view of the table shown in Figure 1;

Figure 4 is a side elevational view of a disassembled side frame of the table;

Figure 5 is a side elevational view of a disassembled base member of the table; and

Figure 6 is an exploded view of the table showing the relationship of the several parts immediately prior to assembly.

By referring to the drawings it will be observed that the table is comprised of a plurality of spaced base members 1. Each base member in turn is so formed from a single piece of material such as plywood, so as to be provided with a floor engaging web portion 2 and leg elements 3, which project vertically upward at each end thereof. Each of the leg elements 3 reinforced through the medium of the joining web 2 are provided with a plurality of spaced fingers 4, at the free ends thereof. The function of these fingers will be described later.

The table is also provided with a pair of side frames 1, one for each longitudinal side of the table. Each side frame isso fabricated from a single piece of material as to be comprised of a web portion 8 and leg elements 9 projecting downwardly from each end thereof. Each leg 9 in turn is reinforced by the said web. Each of the leg elements 9 is also provided at the free ends thereof with a plurality of spaced fingers I0. These latter fingers II] on the leg elements 9 of the side frames as shown in Figures 1, 2 and 4 are adapted to interlock at an angle with the upwardly projecting fingers 4 on the leg of a base member when fingers I are thrust downward between fingers 4 until the base ll of the elongated slot H in each leg 9, of a side frame contacts and coacts with the base l3 of the elongated slot H in each leg 3 of the base member. This interlocking of the base members and side frames at an angle to each other is easy to accomplish and when interlocked they form a strong foundation for a table top [5, without the use of any nails, glue, bolts, screws, etc.

It will be further observed by referring to Figures l, 2 and 4 thatthe table top is provided on the underside thereof, with a plurality of longitudinal slots or recessed portions I6, adjacent each longitudinal marginal edge thereof and the tops ll of side frames 1 are adapted to be inserted within these slots I6, soas to anchor the table top to the side frames.

If desired and to further insure the anchorage of the table top [5 to the side frames 1, each inner face of a side frame I may also be provided with a longitudinal groove or recess 20, within which one or more latching lugs 2|, pivotally attached to the underside of table l5 can be inserted as indicated in Figures 1, 2 and 3.

These lugs 2| may be advantageously made from plywood scraps or some other suitable material.

'If desired alsothe top of each side frame 1 may be made in the form of an upwardly projecting shoulder 22 which is adapted to be inserted with a recess It in the underside of each table top adjacent the longitudinal marginal edge.

To disassemble the table it is simply necessary to turn lugs 2| so as to disengage them from side frames 1. Then the top [5 easily comes off of the side frames 1. Finally when the side frames 1 are lifted upward the legs thereon easily become disengaged from the legs of the base members. All the parts are now ready for convenient storage.

During assembly all of the parts fit firmly and neatly together, the various slots and openings in the several elements being only of sufficient 4 width to snugly accommodate the member adapted to be inserted therein.

End and sideways movement of the table is effectively prevented during assembly by means of the interlocking fingers on the several leg elements, which act as stops or braces on all four sides of the table.

It will be noted that the use of the fioor engaging webs 2 for the end members permits equal amounts of upward thrust to be placed on each leg element 3. The use of web 8 in the side frames allows an equal amount of downward thrust to be applied to each leg 9, all of which provide a sturdier table.

By using the above-described interlocking arrangement then as the means for joining the several members of the table together, each member serves to reinforce its adjacent member and a strong, sturdy knockdown table is provided.

Although the preferred embodiment of the invention contemplates that the several parts of the table be made from materials readily available such as plywood, which lends itself easily to mass production, since it can be cheaply and conveniently shaped, it is obvious that other materials could be used. I

Furthermore, although plywood having a thickness of about of an inch is the usual size of plywood employed in the making of furniture of this kind, it has been found that because of the inherent strength and rigidity afforded the table because of the interlocking arrangement of the several parts or sections of the table of the instant invention, and the web portions provided for the end frames and side members, that plywood having a thickness within the range of to of an inch can also be used with excellent results for all of the parts. In practice plywood of of an inch thickness has been found advantageous. This savings in material is obvious and can in turn be passed on to the consumer.

Various other changes and modifications can be made in the invention without departing from the spirit and scope thereof 'as defined by the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A knockdown table of the type described comprising the combination of a plurality of spaced upright base members, each of said base members being comprised of a floor engaging'web portion and leg elements projecting upwardly from each end of said web portion, each of said leg elements in turn being provided with a plurality of upwardly projecting spaced fingers at the free ends thereof, a pair of side frames, one for each longitudinal side of the said table, each of said side frames being comprised of a web portion and leg elements projecting downwardly from each end thereof and at a transverse angle to the upwardly projecting legs of the said base members, each of said downwardly projecting leg elements also being provided with a plurality of spacedfingers at the free ends thereof which are adapted to interlock at an angle with the up-v wardly projecting fingers on the legs of said base members, and a table top mounted uponsaid side frames, said table top having a longitudinalrecess on the undersurface thereof adjacent its longitudinal marginal edge, within which the top portion of a side frame is adapted to be received. v a

2. A knockdown table of the type described comprising the combination of a plurality of spaced upright base members, each of said base members being comprised of a floor engaging web portion and leg elements projecting upwardly from each end of said web portion, each of said leg elements in turn being provided with a plurality of spaced fingers at the free ends thereof, a pair of side frames, one for each longitudinal side of the said table, eachof said side frames being comprised of a web portion and leg elements projecting downwardly from each end thereof and at a transverse angle to the upwardly projecting legs of the said base members, each of said downwardly projecting leg elements being also provided with a plurality of spaced fingers at the free ends thereof which are adapted to interlock at an angle with the upwardly pro jecting fingers on the legs of said base members,

and at least one of said last-mentioned web portions having a longitudinal recess located on the inner face thereof, and a table top mounted upon said side frames, said table top having a longitudinal recess on its undersurface adjacent its longitudinal marginal edge and a plurality of latching lugs pivotally attached to the undersurface of the table and spaced inwardly from the said recess therein, said lugsbeing insertable,

within the recess on the inner'face of the'web of a side frame, so as to lock said top tosaid frame when the top portion of a side frame is inserted within the recess in the undersurface of said table top.

PHILIP C. CURTIS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1538393 *Oct 12, 1923May 19, 1925Martin Fowler MinnieCamper's table
US1903631 *Jan 26, 1932Apr 11, 1933Morrison Alfred JCollapsible table
US2203780 *Sep 15, 1938Jun 11, 1940Leo B GatzTennis table
US2427832 *Mar 21, 1944Sep 23, 1947Berger BelaFurniture construction
US2522774 *Dec 27, 1948Sep 19, 1950Bower Ernest AlvahPicnic and utility table
US2540254 *Dec 3, 1945Feb 6, 1951Garber WoodwardKnockdown furniture
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2729279 *Mar 2, 1953Jan 3, 1956Shwayder BrothersFolding chair seat fastener
US3166031 *Dec 28, 1962Jan 19, 1965Lauber Mfg CompanyFurniture construction
US4290371 *Sep 5, 1979Sep 22, 1981Indiana Wood Specialty, Inc.Table and method of assembly
US4299423 *Dec 13, 1979Nov 10, 1981Plantation Patterns, Inc.Knockdown settee
US4372224 *Feb 7, 1980Feb 8, 1983Gary J. KnostmanKnockdown furniture construction
US4501082 *Apr 13, 1983Feb 26, 1985Phillips F JosephPortable bench rest
US4766821 *Dec 7, 1987Aug 30, 1988Ashley Furniture Industries, Inc.Table leg securement device
US4818044 *Dec 7, 1987Apr 4, 1989Dobry Bradley MLocker and locker-shelf insert
US5226865 *Dec 7, 1992Jul 13, 1993Chin Taan KPortable exercise stepping stool
DE1205045B *Jun 11, 1959Nov 18, 1965Thomson Houston Comp FrancaiseBuegeleisen mit einem von aussen einstellbaren Thermostaten
DE2243797A1 *Sep 4, 1972Mar 15, 1973Olivetti & Co SpaZusammenlegbarer tisch
WO1981002248A1 *Feb 9, 1981Aug 20, 1981R EhrlichKnockdown furniture construction
Classifications
U.S. Classification108/155, 108/159, 108/156, 211/189, 248/165
International ClassificationA47B3/00, A47B3/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47B2230/0085, A47B3/06
European ClassificationA47B3/06