Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2616557 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 4, 1952
Filing dateNov 25, 1949
Priority dateNov 25, 1949
Publication numberUS 2616557 A, US 2616557A, US-A-2616557, US2616557 A, US2616557A
InventorsGill Robert L, Nash Frank A
Original AssigneeHarry E Olson, Gill Robert L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vacuum-actuated ash tray for vehicles
US 2616557 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v- 1952 R. L. GILL ET AL VACUUM-ACTUATED ASH TRAY FOR VEHICLES 2 SHEETSSHEET 1 Filed Nov. 25, 1949 INVENTOR.

T A nk i O E V. B

N v- 4, 1952 R. L. GILL ET AL VACUUM-ACTUATED ASH TRAY FOR VEHICLES Filed Nov. 25, 1949 2 SHEETSSHEET 2 INVENTORS Rob'eri L. Gill and BY Frank A. Nash Patented Nov. 4, 1952 UNITED STATES .ENT OFFICE VACUUM-AGTUATED ASH TRAY FOR VEHICLES Application November 25, 1949, Serial No. 129,442

(Cl. Zoe-49.5)

Claims. 1

Our invention relates generally to dumpingtype ash trays, and specifically to ash trays for use in vehicles and particularly in automobiles. In connection with the latter use, it is a common occurrence to have ash trays filled with cigarette stubs and debris and, because of their limited capacity, they offer a problem of disposal. This is particularly true if an automobile is being driven along a highway and any of the cigarette butts are still burning. Other disagreeable factors involved in ash trays as presently constructed are that they frequently give off an ofiensive odor which permeates the interior of a vehicle. Also if a driver wishes to use them it is diilicult to dump ashes or cigarettes therein without taking his eyes from the road. It is difficult to extinguish a lighted cigarette therein, and the closure devices therefor are seldom airtight to cut off the supply of oxygen to the interior and to extinguish the burning of partially extinguished cigarette butts.

One of the principal objects of our invention is to provide a handy ash tray which may be secured to the instrument panel of an automobile, which ash tray is of small compass but adequate to receive and hold a partially burned cigarette, and a refuse container which may be arranged some distance therefrom. Said refuse container is evacuated, that is maintained at subatmospheric pressures, and the ash tray is provided with a valve mechanism. Said valve mechanism can be actuated and the cigarette stub, ashes and other refuse willbe drawn into the receiver and the burning thereof will be inhibited or quenched.

A further and more specific object of. our invention is to provide an ash tray of this character which need only be partially actuated and the flow of air moving therethrough from an evacuated refuse container will cause it to move into fully discharged position to have the contents removed therefrom and will return to its initial or filling position by a spring.

A further and more specific object of our invention is to provide a refuse container in connection with said ash tray which will have sufficient capacity to maintain the operation of said associated devices without undue fluctuation, will separate the solids from the air, will collect the solids at the bottom thereof, and be joined to the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine, 7

Fig. 1 is a perspective View of an ash tray, a refuse container, and a container for maintaining a supply of air under subatmospheric pressures, said parts being connected by conduits;

Fig. 2 is a detail view with portions shown broken away, illustrating the details of said refuse collecting container;

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of an ash tray embodying our invention, with portions shown broken away to disclose details of the mountin therefor;

Fig. 4 is an elevation of said ash tray and its mounting and discharge conduit, illustrating the manner in which said ash tray may be mounted upon the bottom of an instrument panel of a vehicle, said panel being shown in section;

Fig. 5 is a similar view of the structures illustrated in Fig. l, but shown rotated and with portions of the housing shown broken away to disclose the ball-check valve for controlling the flow of air from the ash tray to the discharge conduit therefrom; and

Fig. 6 is a sectional View taken on the line 5-6 in both Figs. 4 and 5, but with the portions arranged as they are illustrated in Fig. 4, said section showing structural details of the rotatable receiver and the housing of said ash tray.

An ash tray embodying our invention comprises a bell-shaped housing I, having one open side la and a cup-shaped receiver 2 having one open side 2a. Ihe receiver is journaled in the housing and the open sides of said parts oppose each other so that they define within them a chamber 3. The receiver is carried upon an axial shaft G and is spring-loaded by a torque spring 5. One end of said spring 5a lies Within the bifurcated end L a of the shaft, and the other end 51) of said spring extends laterally from the shaft and engages the exterior of a conduit ii, through which ashes are discharged from said housing. Said conduit preferably forms an integral part of said housing and enters through the closed side ib thereof. Said housing is provided with a funnelshaped aperture '5' extending substantially its entire length, as is shown in Fig. 5, and serves as an aperture into which and through which ashes and cigarette butts may be inserted into said housing.

The receiver 2 is not a complete circle, as is shown in Fig. 6, but is provided with a wall extending over of a circle; that is to say, it extends within the bore of the housing over halfway around it, and thus has good journal bearing therein. A pocket ii is formed therein and this pocket is in registry with the funnel-shaped aperture I when the parts are arranged in filling position. Said parts are resiliently held in registry by the action of the torque spring 5, holding one wall of said pocket against a radial wall 9 forming a part of the housing. Said radial wall extends to and has rubbing contact with a central hub Iii in said receiver and, with a cylindrical ball-receiving well I I, forms an effective partition substantially diametrically of the ash tray when the parts are arranged as is shown in Fig. 6. Said well carries a check valve l2 and encloses a valve spring l3.

Said check valve seats upon the bore 6a of the conduit 6 when the parts are arranged as is shown in Figs. 3 to 6, inclusive, when in filling position. When the receiver rotates into discharging position, the radial wall 9 serves as abutment for the end Ma of the skirt l4 and limits rotation due to said abutment. This brings the pocket 8 into communication with the bore of the conduit 8 so that the contents of said pocket may be discharged through said conduit, as will hereinafter be described. As it is shown most clearly in Figs. 3 and 5, said pocket is arranged uppermost in the ash tray and extends through the closed side 22) of the receiver 2. This permits the ash tray to accommodate a cigarette stub longer than the overall length of said ash tray; that is to say, as long as the major portion of a cigarette stub lies in said pocket so that it will not become overbalanced, it will be retained in said pocket. When the receiver rotates into discharge position, said cigarette stub will be moved endwise through the pocket and into the bore of the conduit. Finger grips [5 are provided on the exterior face of the closed side of the receiver so that said receiver may be turned manually without great difficulty to initiate the discharging thereof.

Said ash tray is preferably carried by a clamp it, having a thumb screw H511 to engage the lower edge of an instrument panel ll of an automobile. Preferably arranged within the engine compartment, that is beneath the hood of an automobile, is a refuse container [8 which may resemble a small jar, such, for example, as a pint jar. A cap I9 is screw-fitted thereon. Said cap is formed somewhat like a cyclone separator with an axial, pendent tube 20 defining the discharge from said container and having an encircling volute 2| as the intake for said container. J oining the conduit 6 with an intake tube Zia on said volute is a section of rubber hose 22, secured to said conduit 6 and said intake tube by the usual clamps 22a. The connection between the conduit and the refuse container is capable of many variations, but a rubber tube and clamps are simple and flexible. Air flowing into said refuse container carrying ashes and cigarette butts flows circumferentially within the walls of the container and drops to the bottom thereof. Air flowing therefrom through the pendent tube 20 thus is separated from the incoming air, but, in the abundance of caution, we preferably provide a screen 23 within the bore of said tube to prevent solids from flowing outwardly into a tank 24, in which a larger supply of air under subatmospheric pressures is maintained. If a refuse container of substantial volume is provided, it is not necessary to have the additional tank. It is common, however, to have said auxiliary tanks in connection with other evacuated apparatus in an automobile, and thus we illustrate this arrangement. Said tank is joined to the container by a section of hose 25 having clamps 25a, and said tank is joined to the intake manifold of an engine (not shown) by tubing 26. To maintain proper subatmospheric pressures within the container l8, we preferably provide a check valve 2'! at the upper end of the pendent tube 25, said check valve being seated by a coil spring 270.. This permits air to flow from the container to the tank, but inhibits reverse flow.

The operation of our improved ash tray is as follows:

Attention is directed to the fact that the pocket, when in filling position, presents a smooth internal surface as is shown in Fig. 6, and there is a relatively close fit between the end wall 8a of said pocket and the housing. Said end wall serves not only as a scoop for moving ashes and cigarette butts along through the ash tray, but also serves as an operating vane, against which atmospheric air reacts to rotate the receiver clockwise, as viewed in Fig. 6, when the check valve is unseated. When ashes and a cigarette butt, for example, are placed in the pocket passing through the funnel-shaped aperture 1, it is necessary only to rotate said receiver clockwise, as viewed in Figs. 3 and 6, a few degrees. This will cause the receiver to rotate and rock the check valve i2 off its seat over the bore of the conduit 6, and air at atmospheric pressure will press against the outer face of the pocket wall 8a and continue the rotation of said receiver until said pocket moves into registration with and communicates with the bore of the conduit. The continued flow of air will cause the ashes and cigarette butt to be discharged through the bore of said conduit and into the receiver. Air flows from the funnel-shaped aperture 1 about the periphery of the receiver and into the bore of said conduit Ea, because the parts are not provided with a tight fit between the peripheral surface of the receiver and the bore of the housing. The flow of air about the receiver and into the bore of the conduit is of sufficient strength to overcome the rotative effects of the torque spring 5. When the air pressures tend to come more or less into balance, that is when the subatmospheric pressures within the container are more or less dissipated, the spring will return the receiver to its original position and the ball-check valve i2 will seat and the interior of the refuse container will then be reduced in pressure, due to the action of the tank or the intake manifold of the engine.

In practice, this series of actions occurs rather quickly. The receiver is rotated 5 or 10 and the flow of air carries the receiver from that position to discharge position, and it is returned by the spring in the matter of only several seconds. It is not essential, therefore, for a driver to look down to grip the end of the receiver carefully. It is necessary only to initiate said rotation and the remainder is wholly automatic. Because the pocket lies parallel with the axis of rotation of the receiver, there is no force tending to throw a cigarette butt out of said receiver, even though it is slightly longer than the latter, and as soon as the flow of air from atmosphere to the bore of the conduit commences, said cigarette butt is quickly drawn into said bore and is disposed of in the refuse container l8.

We claim:

1. The combination of an ash tray and an evacuated refuse collecting container associated therewith, said ash tray comprising a housing, a discharge conduit communicating at one end with said housing and at the other end with said narrower container, a receiver journaled in said housing and with. said housing defining an. enclosed chamber, an aperture leading through the Wall of. said housing, a pocket formed in the peripheral wall of saidreceiver, said aperture and said pocket registering when said ash tray is arranged in filling, position, said pocket communicating with said conduit when said ash tray is in dischargingv position, a checl; valve carried by said receiver, which check valve seals the end of said conduit when said ash tray is in filling position, external means for unseating said check valve and initiating the rotation of said receiver, within said housing, from filling position towards discharging position, and one wallv of said pocketv defining a radially disposed vane in said receiver to continue the rotation of said receiver into discharging position when air fiows through said conduit towards said evacuated refuse collecting container.

2. The combination of an ash tray and an evacuated refuse collecting container associated therewith, said ash tray comprising a housing, a discharge conduit communicating at one end with said housing and at the other end with said container, a receiver journaled in said housing and with said housing defining an enclosed chamber, an aperture leading through the wall of said housing, a pocket formed in the peripheral wall of said receiver, said aperture and said pocket registering when said ash tray is arranged in filling position, said pocket communicating with said conduit when said ash tray is in discharging position, a check valve carried by said receiver, which check valve seals the end of said conduit when said ash tray is in filling position, external means for unseating said check valve and initiating the rotation of said receiver, within said housing, from filling position towards discharging position, and means responsive to the unseating or" said check valve for continuing the rotation of said receiver into discharging position when air fiows through said conduit towards said evacuated refuse collecting container, and a spring means biasing said receiver toward said filling position.

3. A combination of an ash tray and an evacuated refuse collecting container associated therewith, said ash tray comprising a bell-shaped housing, a discharge conduit communicating at one end with said housing and at the other end with said container, a cup-shaped receiver journaled in said housing and with said housing defining an enclosed chamber, a funnel-shaped aperture leading through the wall of said housing, a pocket formed in the peripheral wall of said receiver, said aperture and said pocket registering when said ash tray is arranged in filling position, said pocket communicating with said conduit when said ash tray is in discharging position, a check valve carried by said receiver, which check valve seals the end of said conduit when said ash tray is in filling position, external means for unseating said check valve and initiating the rotation of said receiver, within said housing, from filling position towards discharging position, one wall of said pocket defining a radially disposed vane in said receiver to continue the rotation of said receiver into discharging position when air flows through said conduit towards said evacuated refuse collecting container, and a spring for returning said receiver to its filling position.

4. The combination of a dump-type ash tray with a movable member and an evacuated refuse collectingr container associated therewith. said ash tray and refuse container being joinedbya conduit, said member beingv movable into two positions,,0ne where it can be filled from thesexterior of said ash tray and another where it can discharge its contents into said conduit, a check valvearranged to seal said conduit, said member in moving from the first mentionedposition towards said second mentioned position unseating said check valve, and. means responsiveito the unseating of said check valve. for moving said member into the second mentioned position and discharging the contents of said member, through said conduit, into the receiver.

5; The. combination. of a. dumping-type ash tray with; a movable. member and an. evacuated refuse. collecting, container associated therewith, said ash tray and refuse container beingjoined by a. conduit; said member being movable into two positions, one where it can be filled from the exterior of said ash tray and another where it can discharge its contents into said conduit, and a check valve arranged to seal said conduit, said member in moving from the first mentioned position towards said second mentioned position unseating said check valve, means responsive to the unseating of said check valve for moving said member into the second mentioned position and discharging the contents of said member,

through said conduit, into the receiver, and elastic means for returning said member to its first mentioned position.

6. An ash tray, comprising an ash receiver member biased to a filling position in communication with a filling aperture and mounted for movement to a discharge position in communication with a discharge aperture, means for reducing the air pressure within said discharge aperture, and means rendered effective by a movement of said ash receiver member toward said discharge position and responsive to the reduced air pressure in said discharge aperture for continuing the movement in opposition to said bias.

'7. An ash tray, comprising a rotatable ash receiver member biased to a filling position in communication with a filling aperture and rotatable to a discharge position in communication with a discharge aperture, means for reducing the air pressure within said discharge aperture, and means conditioned by an initial slight rotation of said ash receiver member for continuing said rotation in opposition to the bias, said latter means including a vane responsive to the reduced air pressure in said discharge aperture.

8. An ash tray, comprising an ash receiving member mounted for movement from a filling position in communication with a filling aperture to a discharge position in communication with a discharge aperture, check valve means normally sealing said discharge aperture and responsive to the movement of said ash receiving member for opening the discharge aperture to a reduced air pressure, and means for moving said ash receiver member to said discharge position in response to the opening of said discharge aperture.

9. An ash tray, comprising an ash receiving member mounted for rotation from a filling position in communication with a filling aperture to a discharge position in communication with a discharge aperture, means responsive to the rotation of said ash receiving member for opening the discharge aperture to an area of reduced air pressure, and means sequentially responsive to the opening of said discharge aperture for rotating said ash receiver member to said discharge POSi-y 7 'tiori and returning said ash receiver to said filling position.

10. An ash tray, comprising a rotatably mounted ash receiver member spring biased to a filling position in communication with a filling aperture and rotatably movable to a discharge position in communication with a discharge aperture, valve means spring biased toward sealing relationship with said discharge aperture and responsive to an initial rotation of said ash receiver member against said spring bias from said filling position toward said discharge position to unseat said. valve means and open said discharge aperture, and vane means effective only when said valve means is unseated and said discharge aperture is open to continue rotation of said ash receiver member toward said discharge position in opposition to said spring bias.

ROBERT L. GILL. FRANK A. NASH.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1611437 *Jun 19, 1923Dec 21, 1926Hardesty Francis DSmoker's appliance
US1660143 *Feb 28, 1927Feb 21, 1928Waite Lyman MAsh receptacle
US1912598 *Jan 4, 1932Jun 6, 1933Snadden Joseph XCigarette extinguisher
US1989938 *Oct 13, 1930Feb 5, 1935Marbach Edward RAsh receiver
US1992450 *Aug 4, 1933Feb 26, 1935Sporman David JReceiver for cigars, cigarettes, and the like
US2335094 *Nov 29, 1940Nov 23, 1943Michael Hubert O BrienSelf-emptying ash tray
US2364078 *Sep 18, 1941Dec 5, 1944Kisselle John MCigarette tray
US2377713 *May 7, 1940Jun 5, 1945Paul H BosseAsh tray for vehicles and the like
US2461815 *Mar 28, 1947Feb 15, 1949Gill Robert LVehicle ash receiver with suction discharge
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2769447 *Jan 21, 1955Nov 6, 1956Moberg Theodore EVacuum ash tray for vehicles
US2829766 *Oct 24, 1955Apr 8, 1958Gill Robert LSlidable ash tray
US2838354 *May 10, 1955Jun 10, 1958Bohnsack Harold RAutomatic cigarette ash tray
US2850198 *Jul 29, 1955Sep 2, 1958Horn Thurman WAsh tray
US2851155 *Feb 14, 1955Sep 9, 1958Ellingsen Henry DCigarette ash tray
US2851156 *Apr 26, 1955Sep 9, 1958Thompson Emmett CSuction ash tray
US3011627 *May 21, 1959Dec 5, 1961Warren Frost JohnWaste disposer
US3055493 *May 31, 1960Sep 25, 1962Delman CoLitter collecting device
US3628213 *Oct 13, 1969Dec 21, 1971Abington Textile Mach WorksVacuum cleaning apparatus to remove industrial waste from machinery
US4936321 *Aug 2, 1989Jun 26, 1990Bludis Thomas TVehicle ash receiver with ash discharging device
US5542438 *Apr 21, 1994Aug 6, 1996Progressive Games, Inc.Smokeless ashtray system
US5944024 *Mar 8, 1996Aug 31, 1999Progressive Games, Inc.Vacuum filtration system especially adapted for removing smoke in the vicinity of ashtrays
Classifications
U.S. Classification180/89.11, 55/417, 55/429, 55/459.1, 220/502, 180/90, 131/231
International ClassificationB60N3/08
Cooperative ClassificationB60N3/086
European ClassificationB60N3/08B2