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Publication numberUS2617115 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 11, 1952
Filing dateJul 25, 1949
Priority dateJul 25, 1949
Publication numberUS 2617115 A, US 2617115A, US-A-2617115, US2617115 A, US2617115A
InventorsEllery Emmett C
Original AssigneeEllery Emmett C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ankle joint for artificial legs
US 2617115 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 11, 1952 E. c. ELLERY 2,617,115

ANKLE JOINT FOR ARTIFICIAL LEGS Filed July' 25, 1949 FIG. l.1

FIG. 2.

FIG'. 3.

25 I8 25 I5; I7

FIG. 6.

l 7 WWII/4&4...

42 ATTORNEYS Patented Nov. 11, 1952 UN IT'ED f ).FFH3131` ANKLE .J 01N 'l5 FOR ARTIFICIAL .LEGS

Emmen c. Euere; Hollywood; ea-1in Application Julyz, 194e. V Serial No.. 1.06.6911

(CL2 S+-6).,

4 Claims. 1

This invention has to do with articial legs'of a type embodying v.a feet ,member pvetalyeennected .to a leg member for limited relative pivetel movement..

While severaltypes of ankle joints have been devised for. .use in artificial legs, so far .as I am aware such. joints have been unsatisfactory'in that when worn for any length of time they Cause pressure sores to develop on the amputated stump of the wearer. For example, one form of joint which has been. widelyj used in artificial legs makes use ofV pairA oirubberbumpers for limiting and resisting thepivo-talactionoffthefoot relative to` ,theleg.. Since considerable. forceis required to compress theiubber,.bumperelements to obtain pivotal movement ofthe parts, pressure is brought to bear upon localized areas .of the stumpresulting insores which-can become quite painful. As .a result, the wearerv of this type-of leg nds it extremely ydiiiicult to properly manipulate the leg..

Another diiliculty with. conventionalf artificial legs is the fact that they .do not provide for automatically raising the forward portion-of the foot with the result that a wearer tends to stub the toe portion of the foot andvcannot swing the leg forwardly in `avertical plane without constant danger of -falling. It is alsotrue of many -joints tha-.t only very limited movement is possible at the ankle joint.

An object of this inventionfisto provide anovel and improVedankle-jjoint structure-for an artiiic-ialleg` =which does-I not have'. the.` aboveenoted disadvantages inherent inalegs; having `converttional` ankle Vj oints A particular Object is to prov-ide aniankle joint which. does `not result in undue pressure being brought upon the stump-ofthe `wearer of-an artificial leg embodying fthe joint'. vwith the result that the v-eerer/.is entirely free .of lpressure sores and theleg may ,be comfortably. wor-n.

Anotherobjeetis `to providefan anklevjoi-nt :for anarticial leg. in. which means are vprovided .ior autmatieally raisingf-the toe or forward portion. of. .the foot lof. Ythe. lappliance Fwhenq-the weight of the wearer is taken off the leg in normal walking thereby. greatly diminishing the hazards. of walking., especially over uneven ground and upgrade.

A further .object of. the inventionistofprovide an ankle joint. means.whichl isv deeigned --to ,absorb the shock when .thelee contacts the groundv -as the walking step begins.

Av still further object of the invention is.to provide an anklejoint structure permittinga,

relatively large pivotal movement embodying means for adjusting the amount of pivotal movement or excursionfof the joint.

Another object is to provide ankle joint means in whichv spring means is employed `for automatically raising the 'toe of the foot and 'for absorbing the shock-of the heel striking the ground.

Af-fur-therobject of the invention is t0 DIfovide asimple ankle joint--construction which may be economically manufactured and readily installed in articial legs.

These and "otherobjects will be Yapparent from the drawing and the following descrptionthereof;

Referring to the drawing, which is for illustrative purposes only:

Figs l *isi an elevational Iview partly broken away of an artificial leg embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 `is aside elevational view of an ankle vjoint structure embodyingvthe invention;

Fig.l 3 'is a plan view of thestructure of Fig.Y 2;

Fig.l 4 isa sectional view onthe line i4-4 Yof Fig. 2

Fig. 5V-isa sectional lview onfthe line 5--5 of IFig'. 3; and

Fig. 6 is a cross section-on the line S- of Fig. 2.'

More particularly describing the invention, reference numeral I I generally indicates an arti- .cial leg-which includes a leg part I2 and a foot member III.. These parts vare pivotally connected for vlimited `relative pivotal movement by. means offanl ankle -joint structure generally indicated by .numeral 15."

The ankle joint structure I 5 comprises basically a pair of plates which are hingedly or pivotallyv connected together vwith means -for adjustably limiting the pivotal 'movement -of lthe plates and a-means for biasing the plates in one direction. Referring particularly to "Figs,- 2-6,' the ankle joint-means includes an upper plate member I6 and 'a.=lower plate I'I. The upper plate is provided With' anupwardly'extending centrally 1ocated boss I8 having `a threaded socket i9 for the .reception of afboltwhich is held in position bymeans vofae-retaining nut 2I. The bolt 20-is adapted toeXtend-.through an opening 23 formed in a mounting partition 24 (Fig. 1). at the lower endor the-leg portion I2fof the. artificial leg. The plete I6 .is .alsosprovided withanpropriate .holes p25 ferr-the v`re,Cantieriof fxneunting screws. and these-together.. with gafnut. 26 and a Washer 21.0n the lbolt serveto-secure the Yupper.plate tothe leg.

Theaupper. plate.. is formed Eto. provideA` three depending centrally disposed lugs or ears, the outer two of which have been indicated by the numeral 30 and the innermost or centrally disposed one of which has been indicated by numeral 3l. These parts of the upper plate are provided with axially aligned bores 30', 3 I for receiving a pivot pin 32 which will be further described later.

The lower plate I'I is centrally apertured at 35 and is provided with a pair of guide ribs 36 on its inner surface. A U-shaped connecting member 38, including a base portion 39, adapted to t between the guide ribs 36, serves to mount the lower plate I'I and connect it to the upper plate. The connecting member is provided with a threaded bore 39' in the base 39 which receives a mounting bolt 42, the mounting bolt being provided with a shoulder 43 for abutting the outer surface of the lower plate I'I.

The connecting member 38 includes the two leg portions 45 which are bored at 45 to receive the pivot pin 32. Various means may be provided for securing the mounting pin in place. However, in the form of the invention shown, each of the outer lugs 30 of the upper plate are recessed at 41 to receive retaining washers 4B. These washers accommodate retaining screws 49 which thread into the ends of the pivot pin 32.

The mounting pin 42 is adapted to extend through a bore 52 in the body 53 of the foot element I4 of the artiicial leg. In addition, the lower plate is provided with screw holes 54 so that the plate may be additionally anchored to the body 53 by screws (not shown).

It will be obvious from the description thus far that the construction described provides for pivotal movement of the plates I6 and I'! relative to each other. In order to limit this movement a pair of adjustable stops; is provided. Re-

ferring particularly to Figs. 2 and 5, these stops are mounted on the lower plate one at each end thereof and each comprises an adjustment screw 56 which is threadedly received in the plate and which carries a lock or retaining nut 51 thereon for locking the screw in adjusted position. The inner ends of the screws are provided with a flat plate-like head 58 upon which is mounted a rubber or rubber-like bumper 60. The bumpers are adapted to contact the inner surface of the upper plate I6 and for this purpose the heel or rearward end of that plate is provided with a recess 6I on its inner surface for the reception of the rear stop member.

It is a particular feature of the invention that means are provided in the ankle joint for automatically cushioning the leg as the heel contacts the ground during walking and for automatically raising the toe of the foot when weight is taken off the leg. The means for accomplishing this comprises a compression spring 64 which is mounted rearwardly of the pivotal axis of the plates and is shown as carried on a pin 65 mounted on the lower plate. The upper end portion of the spring is received within a suitable bore or recess 56 formed in the underside of the upper plate I6.

It will be apparent that, with the construction described, the excursion or amount of relative pivotal movement between the upper and lower plates and hence the foot I4 and leg I2 of the articial leg, may be limited and adjusted to suit a particular wearer by means of the adjustable stop or abutment means described. It will also be apparent that the spring 54 serves as a means for cushioning the shock or jar of the leg contacting the ground and serves to automatically raise the toe or forward portion of the foot I4 during walking as the weight of the wearer is taken off the leg. It is, of course, contemplated that a tension spring might be employed forwardly of the pivotal axis of the plates in place of the compression spring shown;

Although the invention has been particularly shown and described, it is contemplated that various changes and modications can be made without departing from the scope thereof as defined in the claims.

I claim:

l. In ankle joint means for an artificial leg having a leg portion and a foot portion, an upper plate having an upwardly extending mounting bolt for securing the plate to the leg portion of the artificial leg, said plate having apertured depending lugs centrally thereof, a lower plate, a pivot pin carried by the lugs on the upper plate, a connecting member receiving said pivot pin and pivotally connected to the upper plate thereby, a mounting bolt detachably securing said lower plate to said connecting member and being adapted to secure said connecting member and lower plate as a unit to the foot portion of the artificial leg, a spring interposed between said plate for biasing the plates pivotally in one direction, and a pair of adjustable stops for limiting relative pivotal movement of the plates, said stops being located one at each end of said lower plate and each comprising a set screw carrying a resilient pad for engagement by the upper plate.

2. In ankle joint means for an artificial leg having a leg portion and a foot portion, an upper plate, said plate having apertured depending lugs centrally thereof, a lower plate, a pivot pin carried by the lugs on the upper plate, a connecting member receiving said pivot pin and pivotally connected to the upper plate thereby, a mounting bolt detachably securing said lower plate to said connecting member and being adapted to secure said connecting member and lower plate as a unit to the foot portion of the articial leg, and a pair of adjustable stops for limiting relative pivotal movement of the plates, said stops beng located one at each end of said lower plate and each comprising a set screw carrying a resilient pad for engagement by the upper plate.

3. In ankle joint means for an artificial leg having a leg portion and a foot portion, an upper plate, said plate having apertured depending lugs centrally thereof, a lower plate, a pivot pin carried by the lugs on the upper plate, a connecting member receiving said pivot pin and pivotally connected to the upper plate thereby, a mounting bolt detachably securing said lower plate to said connecting member and being adapted to secure said connecting member and lower plate as a unit to the foot portion of the artificial leg, and a spring interposed between said plates for biasing the plates pivotally in one direction.

4. In ankle joint means for an artificial leg having a leg portion and a foot portion, an upper plate, said plate having apertured depending lugs centrally thereof, a lower plate, a pivot pin carried by the lugs on the upper plate, a connecting member receiving said pivot pin and pivotally connected to the upper plate thereby, a mounting bolt detachably securing said lower plate tc saidv connecting member and being adapted to REFEREL CES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Number Name Date Foster June 29, 1869 Loeiller July 1, 1902 Gaines et al Aug. 5, 1913 Beck July 9, 1940 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Germany Mar. 27, 1923 Germany Sept. 29, 1925

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US92031 *Jun 29, 1869 Improved artificial leg
US703431 *Mar 24, 1902Jul 1, 1902Edward F LoefflerArtificial limb.
US1069409 *Aug 20, 1912Aug 5, 1913Arthur A ErbAnkle-joint for artificial feet.
US2207473 *Nov 26, 1937Jul 9, 1940Beck Gilbert EArtificial limb
DE372426C *Oct 8, 1921Mar 27, 1923Anton LeistenKuenstlicher Fuss
DE419380C *Mar 28, 1924Sep 29, 1925Robert KellnerVerbindungsgelenk zwischen den die Gegenflaechen am kuenstlichen Unterschenkel und Fuss bildenden beiderseitigen Gelenkplatten
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4499613 *Mar 1, 1983Feb 19, 1985Yarrow Harry AAnkle joint and coupling for artificial limbs
US4605417 *Oct 3, 1984Aug 12, 1986Fleischauer K EProsthetic joint
US5728175 *Oct 3, 1995Mar 17, 1998Rincoe; Richard G.Artificial ankle joint with cushion structures and prosthetic devices formed therewith
US6120547 *Nov 6, 1998Sep 19, 2000Roland J. ChristensenEnhanced prosthetic foot structure with ankle reinforcement
US6537322Mar 27, 2000Mar 25, 2003Christopher Lyle JohnsonProsthetic foot assembly having improved resilient cushions and components
US6663673May 3, 2002Dec 16, 2003Roland J. ChristensenProsthetic foot with energy transfer medium including variable viscosity fluid
US6805717Oct 8, 2002Oct 19, 2004Roland J. Christensen, As Operating Manager Of Rjc Development, Lc, General Manager Of The Roland J. Christensen Family Limited PartnershipEnergy-storing prosthetic foot with elongated forefoot
US6875241Feb 5, 2003Apr 5, 2005Roland J. Christensen, As Operating Manager Of Rjc Development Lc, General Partner Of The Roland J. Christensen Family Limited PartnershipVariable resistance cell
US6875242Dec 16, 2003Apr 5, 2005Roland J. Christensen, As Operating Manager Of Rjc Development, Lc, General Partner Of The Roland J. Christensen Family Limited PartnershipProsthetic foot with energy transfer medium including variable viscosity fluid
US6911052Oct 8, 2002Jun 28, 2005Roland J. Christensen, As Operating Manager Of Rjc Development, Lc, General Partner Of The Roland J. Christensen Family Limited PartnershipProsthetic foot with oblique attachment
US6929665Oct 8, 2002Aug 16, 2005Roland J. ChristensenProsthetic foot with a resilient ankle
US6966933Oct 21, 2003Nov 22, 2005Roland J. Christensen, As Operating Manager Of Rjc Development, Lc, General Partner Of The Roland J. Christensen Family Limited PartnershipProsthetic foot with an adjustable ankle and method
US6969408Sep 30, 2003Nov 29, 2005Ossur Engineering, Inc.Low profile active shock module prosthesis
US7169190May 2, 2005Jan 30, 2007Van L. PhillipsActive shock module prosthesis
US7172630Feb 20, 2004Feb 6, 2007Roland J. Christensen, As Operating Manager Of Rjc Development, Lc, General Partner Of The Roland J. Christensen Family Limited PartnershipProsthetic foot with cam
US7341603Apr 4, 2005Mar 11, 2008Applied Composite Technology, Inc.Prosthetic foot with energy transfer including variable orifice
US7371262Sep 2, 2005May 13, 2008össur hfLow profile active shock module prosthesis
US7419509Sep 8, 2004Sep 2, 2008Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with a resilient ankle
US7462201Oct 20, 2004Dec 9, 2008Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with an adjustable ankle and method
US7520904Oct 19, 2005Apr 21, 2009Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with an adjustable ankle and method
US7572299Mar 15, 2006Aug 11, 2009Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with energy transfer
US7618464Aug 3, 2006Nov 17, 2009Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with variable medial/lateral stiffness
US7686848Jan 4, 2008Mar 30, 2010Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with energy transfer
US7727285Jan 22, 2008Jun 1, 2010Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with variable medial/lateral stiffness
US7794506Sep 16, 2008Sep 14, 2010Freedom Innovations, LlcMulti-axial prosthetic ankle
US7824446Dec 5, 2007Nov 2, 2010Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with longer upper forefoot and shorter lower forefoot
US8034121Apr 17, 2009Oct 11, 2011Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with two leaf-springs joined at heel and toe
US8500825Jun 29, 2010Aug 6, 2013Freedom Innovations, LlcProsthetic foot with floating forefoot keel
EP0255556A1 *Aug 8, 1986Feb 10, 1988K.E. FleischauerProsthetic joint
WO1998053769A1 *May 29, 1998Dec 3, 1998College Park Ind IncProsthetic foot assembly having improved resilient cushions and components
Classifications
U.S. Classification623/52
International ClassificationA61F2/60, A61F2/66, A61F2/50
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2002/5072, A61F2002/5009, A61F2/60, A61F2002/5003, A61F2/6607
European ClassificationA61F2/66A