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Publication numberUS2617517 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 11, 1952
Filing dateFeb 15, 1946
Priority dateFeb 15, 1946
Publication numberUS 2617517 A, US 2617517A, US-A-2617517, US2617517 A, US2617517A
InventorsDaniels George H
Original AssigneeDaniels George H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Receptacle filling machine
US 2617517 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 11, 1952 G. H. DANIELS RECEPTACLE FILLING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR H a y W ATTORNEY Filed Feb. 15. 1946 Nov. 11, 1952 G. H. DANIELS RECEPTACLE FILLING MACHINE s Sheets- Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 15, 1946 m 1 ill INVENTOR eoz qeflfiazzzels ATTORNEY INVENTOR Geoqgef/fiani I [5 Mam ATTORNEY 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 G H DANIELS RECEPTACLE FILLING MACHINE Nov. 11, 1952 Flled Feb 15, 1946 Nov. 11, 1952 e. H. DANIELS 2,617,517

RECEPTACLE FILLING MACHINE Filed Feb. 15, 1946 s Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR (v eo 'geil. Daniels ATTO R N EY Nov. 11, 1952 G. H. DANIELS 2,617,517

'RECEPTACLE FILLING MACHINE ATTORNEY Nov. 11, 1952 G. H. DANIELS RECEPTACLE FILLING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Feb. 15, 1946 INVENTOR eorgeil .Zazziels 1 m ..//r /x I 0 MN ww m v Q Q mm No.

ATTORNEY Patented Nov. 11, 1952 UNITED STAT E's PATENT OFFICE RECEPTACLE FILLING MACHINE George H. Daniels, Westfield, N. J. Application February 15, 1946, Serial No. 647,883 (01. 19830) 16 Claims.

The present invention relates in general to improvements in the construction and operation of receptacle filling machines, and more particularly to machines for discharging a predetermined number of freely movable articles, such as articles shaped as balls, rollers, discs and the like, into a receptacle or container therefor. Machines of this type are especially useful in the pharmaceutical field for discharging a predetermined number of medicinal tablets into a bottle or, other container. v

The general object of my invention is the provision of an improved machine of the character described which automatically and periodically discharges a predetermined number of freely movable articles into one or more receptacles. A further and more specific object is the provision of a receptacle filling machine in which articles of circular cross-section are automatically aligned in an edge-to-edge formation in a pluralityof side-by-side raceways, and a measured number periodically and simultaneously discharged from each raceway. A further specific object is the provision of a receptacle filling machine in which the number of articles to be periodically discharged can be easily and quickly varied over a relatively wide range by a simple adjustment of the article number measuring mechanism. A further object is a receptacle filling machine in which the charge of articles from a plurality of side-byside raceways simultaneously discharge without clogging into a common receptacle. A further object is a receptacle filling machine of the character described in which the effective Width and height of all of the raceways of the machine can be simultaneously and rapidly adjusted for a relatively wide range of article widths and diameters. A further object is the provision of a receptacle filling machine of relatively low cost simple construction in which the articles are delivered from a storage point, aligned, measured in number and discharged into a receptacle substantially without exposure to the atmosphere and without handling by an operator.

The various features of novelty which characterize my invention are pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of this specification. For a better understanding of the invention, its operating advantages and specific objects attained by its use, reference should be had to the accompanying drawings and descriptive matter in which a preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated and described.

Of the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a tablet bottle filling machine constructed in accordance with my invention;

Fig. 2 is a front view of the machine;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the machine;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged broken view in section of a portion of the machine shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4a is a further enlargement of a portion of the apparatus shown in Fig. 4;

Fig. 5 is a side elevation of one of the stop member adjusting devices; 1

Fig. 6 is a section on the line 6-6 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a view taken on the line 1-'! of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a vertical section on the line 8-8 of Fig; 3;

Fig. 9 is an enlarged transverse section on the line 99 of Fig. 1;

Figs. 10 and 11 are enlarged transverse sections on the lines Iii-40 and H-H respectively of Fig. 3;

Fig. 12 is an enlarged broken plan view of a portion of Fig. 3 with the adjustable raceway bars in a diiferent position; and

Fig. 13 is an enlarged fragmentary section on the line l3--|3 of Fig. 12.

In the drawings, my invention is illustrated as embodied in a machine, for discharging predetermined numbers of medicinal tablets having flat or rounded sides into bottles, a field of use for which the machine of my invention is especially adapted because of the close control of medicinal tablet quantities required-by statute.

The receptacle filling machine illustrated consists of three main sections, (1) an upper tablet feeding and aligning section in which tablets from a supply container are vibrated until in edge-t0- edge contact in a'series of separate feed channels, 2) an intermediate tablet measuring section in which a predetermined number of tablets are periodically and simultaneously segregated in each of a series of side-by-side raceways communicating with the feed channels in the feeding and aligning section and periodically discharged simultaneously, and (3) a lower tablet discharge section in which the tablets from a group of raceways are simultaneously discharged into a common receptacle.

As shown in Figs. 1, 2, 3, 10 and 11, the tablet feeding and aligning section is formed by an electro-magnetic vibrator unit of any suitable form having an inclined shallow vibrating pan it open at its lower end. The pan 16 contains a replaceable molded or cast trough member l1 divided by longitudinally extending parallel vertical partitions l8 into a series of side-by-side feed channels [9. The uppermost section of the pan has a raised floor portion [6 at the level of the top of the channels 19 and located below a transversely elongated hopper 23 divided by vertical division plates 2! into a plurality of sections 22, each delivering to a separate group of feed chan nels I9. The hopper sections receive a supply of tablets from a suitable storage bin, traveling belt conveyor, or grill vibrator unit'thereabove (not shown) and are kept substantially full to insure an ample supply of tablets to the channels l9 at all times. The hopper is pivoted at its rear end on the pan l6, as indicated at 24, and has its forward end adjustably held above the raised section of the pan by spring clamps 25 a predetermined distance sufiicient to permit a single layer of tablets to move thereunder when on their sides as the pan is vibrated. In the machine shown, twenty feed channels I9 are employed, with the hopper 23 divided into four sections, each delivering tablets 23 to five feed channels.

The upper end section of the partitions [8 have oppositely beveled sides converging to a peak, as shown in Figs. 3 and 11, and as the tablets move on their sides oii the raised pan section It by the vibratory effect, the tablets pass onto the beveled side section of the partitions I8 and are automatically turned upright, i. e., on their circular edges, in the feed channels [9 by the continued vibration and beveled surfaces, as indicated in Fig. 11. The channels are proportioned in width to provide a slight clearance, such as 1%, between the sides of the tablets and the adjacent vertical partition sides to permit free movement of the tablets in the inclined channels in edge-to-edge alignment and yet prevent any overlapping of tablets which would tend to clog the feed channels. Other forms of trough members I! with difierent widthsof feed channels may be easily and quickly substituted in the vibrator pan for that shown to fit other tablet thicknesses. The lower end section of the partitions [8 have parallel sides, as shown in Fig. 10. A fiat transparent plate 25 rests on and forms the top of the lowermost section of the feed channels, leaving sufficient top clearance to permit free movement of a single row of tablets in each channel under the vibratory action, while a removable transparent box member 21 fits over the remaining portion of the trough member to prevent exposure of the tablets to the atmosphere. Any tablets accidentally carried down on their sides on top of the partitions IE will be blocked by the plate 26 from further movement in that position. The supply of tablets to the channels 19 is controlled by the operator by regulating the vibratory effect in any suitable manner, such as by controlling the vibrator frequency.

The intermediate tablet measuring section is formed with a stationary base plate 30 mounted on a supporting framework 3| at a greater inclination than the trough channels, an inclination of about 30 to the horizontal being suitable, for example. Floor plate sections 32 are secured to the base plate in longitudinally spaced relation to form four upwardly tapering transverse slots 33 therebetween in which corresponding inverted U-shaped adjusting bars 34 and 35 are slideably movable transversely of the base plate. The slots 33 and bars 34 and 35 are arranged in pairs spaced longitudinally of the base plate. Adjusting screws 36 and 31 mounted in stationary side bars 38 at opposite sides of the base plate 30 are operatively connected to one end of the bars 34 and 35 respectively, the screws 35 being at one side of the machine and the screws 31 at the opposite side. The adjusting bars 34 and 35 are connected to corresponding alternate longitudinally extending parallel raceway-forming bars 4!] and 4! respectively by screws 42, the bars 40 and 4! of adjacent pairs forming a tablet raceway 43 therebetween and being movable towards and away from each other by the corresponding adjusting screws to vary the width of the raceways 43 to fit tablets of a particular thickness with a predetermined side clearance, permitting the tablets to freely roll down the raceways and yet preventing any overlapping which might tend to clog the raceways. The tablet feeding and aligning section of the machine is detachably connected to the intermediate section, as by guide pins 45, tohave 4 the lower ends of the feed channels 13 therein register with the upper ends of corresponding raceways 43 in the intermediate section.

The bars 43 and. 41 are shown in Figs. 3 and 9 in the maximum raceway width position, the bars 40 being moved to the right by the adjusting bars 34 and the bars 4! towards the left by the adjusting bars 35, as seen in Fig. 9, to decrease the width of the raceways 43, such as to the position indicated in Figs. 12 and 13, when tablets of lesser thickness are to be handled. A range of tablet thicknesses of a e to is permissible, for example. The outer sides of the outermost raceways 43 are defined by inverted channel members 43 and 4'! adjacent the stationary bars 38, the channel 33 being secured to and movable with the adjusting bars 33 and the channel 41 similarly connected to the adjusting bars 35, by screws 50. The adjusting screws 35 and 31 abut the outer legs of the channels 43 and 41 respectively and thereby actuate the corresponding bars 34 and 35 inwardly. The channels 46 and 4'! are also resiliently connected to the adjacent stationary side bars 38 by spaced bolts 48 extending through the outer leg of the corresponding channelbar and carrying springs 49 thereon which move the adjusting bars laterally when the adjusting screws are turned to permit an increase in the raceway width.

A removable'transparent cover plate 52 having a series of short parallel depending ribs 53 extending longitudinally of its underside is resiliently supported over the intermediate tablet measuring section at its sides by springs 55 on projecting bolts 54, the plate position being adjustable by thumb nuts 56. Adjacent ribs 53 are transversely spaced a distance corresponding to the centerline spacing of the raceways 43, so that by adjustment of the nuts 55 the effective height of the tablet raceways 43 can be regulated. Preferably the raceway height defined by the bottoms of the ribs 53 will permit a slight clearance over the tablet diameter, permitting free movement of the tablets but preventing any deviation from the edge-to-edge tablet formation in the raceways. The cover plate is thus quickly removable to permit cleaning of the racewavs.

In accordance with my invention, mechanism is provided for segregating a corresponding number of tablets in each raceway and discharging the batches of segregated tablets simultaneously from all of the raceways. For this purpose, the base plate 33 and floor plate sections 32 have transverse rows of registering stop pin openings 65 along the centerline of the raceways, the rows of openings being longitudinally spaced to se regate variable quantities of tablets of different diameters. The machine illustrated is adapted to segregate 5 to 25 tablets, ranging in diameter from to /2", in each raceway, for example. A pair of cross-bars SI and 62 are provided below the base plate, the upper cross-bar 6| carrying a series of stop pins 63 and the lower cross-bar 62 carrying a series of stop pins 34. The pins 63 and 64 are mounted in holes 65 in the crossbars and held in position by screws 55 which permit regulation of the extent of projection of the pins through the corresponding openings Bil into the raceways. The cross-bar 62 is normally located below the lowermost row of stop pin openings 53 and the cross-bar 6! below the row of open-ings 30 which will permit a predetermined number of tablets in'the portion of each raceway between the two rows of openings 60 then occupied by the stop pins 53 and 64.

The cross-bars BI and 62 are resiliently supported by horizontal extension arms 68 projecting through vertically elongated slots 69 in the inner side of pairs of traveling carriages 79 at opposite sides of the machine. A pair of vertical flanges 15 extend outwardly on each carriage along the sides of the slot 69. The carriages 76 are slideably mounted in U-shaped rails 12 extending along the sides of the machine. Each cross-bar arm, as shown in Figs. 5-7, is resiliently supported on a spring 13 carried on a bolt 14, threaded through the arm and slideably extending through the bottom flange ll of the carriage flanges '15, the spring 13 abutting the carriage bottom flange and underside of the extension arm. When the cross-bar 6| or 62 is to be moved to a new row of stop pin openings, the operator presses down on thumb nuts 76 on the upper ends of the bolts 54, depressing the cross-bar against the action of the springs 73 until the corresponding stop pins are below the base plate 30. The pair of opposite carriages I9 are then simultaneously slid along the rails E2 to the desired new position.

The mechanism for vertically reciprocating the stop pins 83 and 64 in the corresponding set of openings 60 consists of a cam 88 having bearing portions 19 rotatably mounted in the flanges -15 of each carriage 79 at the outer sides of the bolts 14 and arranged to actuate the corresponding extension bar 68, the cam bearing portions 19 being provided with square openings through which a square operating shaft 82 at each side of the machine extends, so that the carriage and cam are slideable on the shaft. The end portions of each shaft 82 are of circular cross-section for rotation in pillow blocks 83 secured to the base plate 39. The lower'ends of the shafts carry bevel gears 84 which are arranged to mesh with oppositely arranged bevel gears 65 and 86 on a transverse drive shaft 88 driven by an electric motor 89 through suitable speed reducing mechanism, as indicated in Fig. 1. The shafts 82 thus rotate in opposite directions as indicated and the transversely opposite cams 80 are oppositely arranged, providing a uniform vertical reciprocating movement of each cross-bar throughout its length and the stop pins thereon. The pair of cams on each shaft 82 are of similar shape and angularly spaced 180 thereon, so that when the stop pins 63 are in their lowermost or retracted position, i. e., flush with or slightly below the bottoms of the raceways, the stop pins 94 are in their uppermost or raised position, i. e. about at the center line of the tablets, and vice versa. Such a degree of projection provides an effective stop for the tablets, yet avoids any tendency to rupture the same. Each cross-bar is provided with spaced adjusting screw stops 99 which are arranged to contact with the bottom of the base plate when the cross-bar is raised and limit the amount of projection of the stop pins into the raceways. This adjustment is advantageous for different tablet diameters. The curved surfaces of the cams are proportioned to effect a short dwell in the raised position, a gradual descending movement, a long dwell in the low position, and a rapid return of the stop pins to the raised position.

. When the described mechanism is put into operation, the vibrator is first run with the stop pins 64 in their raised position and the pins 63 flush with the bottom of the raceways, permitting a free flow of tablets through the registering feed channels l9 and raceways 43 until the raceways are filled. The measuring and discharge mechanism is then ready to operate. The motor 89 is then started, operating the shafts 82 to actuate th cams and stop pin mechanism, raising the stop pins 63 to cut off the flow of tablets above that level and then lowering the stop pins 64 to allow the charge of tablets of a predetermined number depending upon the location of the row of openings 60 occupied by the pins 63, to simultaneously discharge from the lower end of all of the raceways. The motor speed is regulated so that when the raceway section between the upper and lower stop pin locations is cleared, the pins 64 will rise into'the raceway and the pins 63 descend to permit a new charge of tablets to flow into the tablet measuring section. The raceway and feed channel lengths are proportioned to provide an ample tablet storage space, insuring a full charge of tablets into the'measuring section during the period while the pins 63 areretracted and a substantially continuous flow of tablets into the feed channels. As shown in Figs. 4 and 4a, a relatively large number of rows of stop pin openings 60' are provided to permit adjustment of the machine to handle a relatively wide range of tablet diameters in charges ranging in number in each raceway. For example, the machine illustratedis designed to discharge tablets in sizes A,." to in diameter in batches of 5, 6, 20 or 25 tablets in each raceway. The free flow of tablets without danger of clogging the raceways, afforded by the permissible adjustment for changes in tablet thickness and diameter, permits a rapid cycle of tablet loading and discharge periods to be maintained, such as 9 cycles per minute, for example.

The machine is provided with a tablet discharge section constructed to permit a plurality of raceways to discharge simultaneously into a common receptacle, such as one of a row of tablet bottles 92 held in a master block or conveyor 93. 'Each bottle is positioned below the lower end of a corresponding funnel 94 carried by a frame 95 which is vertically adjustable on the machine supporting structure 3|. As shown in Figs. 1-4 and 8, the lowermost floor plate section 32 has a series of pairs of downwardly converging guide plates 96 thereon, each pair of guide plates extending across the discharge end of a plurality of raceways 43 and having the space between their lower ends registering with an opening 91 in the side of a corresponding cylindrical funnel 99 above the mouth of a corresponding subjacent funnel 94. A removable transparent cover plate I00 extends over the guide plates 96 and funnels 99 to minimize exposure of the tablets to the atmosphere.

In the machine shown, groups of five raceways are illustrated as simultaneously discharging into each bottle 92. I have found that five converging streams of tablets tend to clog the relatively restricted opening 91 into the funnel 99. To eliminate this tendency and to maintain a free uninterrupted tablet fiow into the bottles, I have provided a downwardly tapering gradually thickening section I92 on the upper surface of the floor plate section with its upper end opposite the three center raceways of each group of five. This forms in effect a ski jump for these three rows of tablets and as a result appears to raise these tablets sufiiciently abov the two outer rows of tablets that there is no interference between the tablets entering the opening 91 sufficient to cause clogging. Rapid filling of the bottles is eiiected in one or more cycles of the machine, depending upon the desired number of tablets to be inserted, and the filled bottles are then replaced by'a new setof bottles manually or mechanically without interrupting the-operating cycle.

Whilein accordance with the provisions of the statutes I have illustrated and described herein the best form of the invention now known to me,

those skilled in the art will understand that changes maybe made in the form of the apparatus' disclosed without departing from the spirit of'the invention covered by my claims, and that certain features of the invention may sometimes be used to advantage without a corresponding use of other features. While the machine has been specifically described and is especially useful for handlingarticles of circular cross-section, it can also be used for other freely movable articles, such as capsules, which will slide down the raceways, for example.

I claim:

;1. article handling machine comprising a measuring section including a pluralityofsidee by-sicle inclined stationary raceways arranged to receive rows of freely movable articles and means for periodically segregating in and subsequently gravitationally discharging all of a predetermined group of ,said articles simultaneously from each of said raceways, and a discharge section including stationary guide means for directing the articles discharged from a plurality of groups of raceways to corresponding common discharge enin 2. An article handling machine comprising a feeding and aligning section including means for feeding and aligning freely movable articles in rows in a plurality of side-,by-side feed channels, an intermediate measuring section including a plurality of side-by-side inclined stationary raceways arranged to receive rows of articles from corresponding feed channels and means for periodically segregating in and subsequently gravitationally discharging'jall of a predetermined group of said articles simultaneously from each of said raceways, and a discharge section including stationary guide means for directing the articles discharged irom a plurality of groups of raceways to corresponding common discharge ope in s.

'3. an article handling machine comprising a floor, a series of raceway-forming bars arranged in pairs on said floor to form stationary raceways therebetween' fonrows of articles, and a transversely movable bar supporting member arranged forrelatively moving said raceway-forming bars in transversely :opposite directions to vary the width of said raceways.

4. An article handling machine comprising an inclined floor, a series of raceway-forming bars arranged in pairs on said 'floor' to form inclined stationary raceways therebetwe'en for rows of articles, a transverse adjusting bar secured to one of the raceway-forming bars of each pair, a second transverse adjusting bar secured to the other raceway-forming bar of each 'pair, and me'ans for transversely moving said adjusting bars in opposite directions to vary the width of said raceways.

5. An article handling machine comprising an inclined floor haying longitudinally spaced transversely extending slots therein, aseries'ci raceway-iorming bars arranged in pairs on said floor to form inclined raceways 'therebetween :f or rows of articles, a'pair oflongitudinally spaced trans- 8 verse adjusting bars in said slots secured to one of the raceway-forming bars of each pair, a sec,- ond pair of longitudinally spaced transverse adjusting bars in said slots secured to the other raceway-forming bar of each pair, and means for transversely moving said adjusting bars in opposite directions to vary the width of said raceways.

6. An article handling machine comprising a iioor, a series of raceway-forming bars on said floor arranged in pairs to form raceways therebetween on said floor for rows of articles, a frame having depending members extending downwardly between corresponding pairs of raceway-forming bars and defining the height of said raceways, and means for varying the position of said frame to correspondingly vary the effective height of said raceways.

'7. An article handling machine comprising an inclined floor, a series of raceway-forming bars arranged in pairs on said floor to form inclined raceways therebetween for rows of articles, means for transversely moving said. raceway-forming bars in opposite directions to vary the width of said raceways, a cover plate having depending members above each raceway and defining the height of said raceways, and means for varying the position of said cover plate to correspondingly vary the eifective height of said raceways.

8. An article handling machine comprising an inclined floor, a series of raceway-forming bars arranged in pairs on said floor to form inclined raceways therebetween for rows of articles, a transverse adjusting bar secured to one of the raceway-forming'bars of each plate, a second transverse adjusting ibar secured to the other raceway-forming bar of each pair, means for transversely moving said adjustin bars'in opposite directions to vary the width of said raceways, a cover plate having depending members above each raceway and defining the height of said raceways, and means for varying the position of said cover plate to correspondingly vary the effective height of said raceways.

9. An article handling machine comprising an inclined floor, means arranged to form a series of inclined side-by-side raceways on said floor, means for supplying a row of articles to each of said raceways, upper and lower transverse rows ,of floor openings spaced longitudinally in said raceways, upper and lower transverse rows of stop pins arranged for reciprocation in said upper and lower rows of floor openings respectively normal to the angle of inclinationof said raceways, and means for alternately raising and lowering said upper and lower rows of stop pins to periodically segregate and discharge a predetermined number of articles from all of said raceways simultaneously including transversely extending bars arranged to hold the stop pins in said rows normal to the angle of inclination of said raceways.

10. An article handling machine comprising an inclined floor, means arranged to form a series of inclined side-by-side raceways on said floor, means for supplying a row of articles to each of said raceways, upper and lower transverse rows of floor openings spaced longitudinally in said raceways, upper and lower transverse rows of stop pins arranged for reciprocation in said upper and lower rows of floor openings respectively, and means for alternately raising and lowering said upper and lower rows of stop pins to periodically segregate and discharge a predetermined number of articles from all of said raceways simultaneously including a cross-bar adjustably supporting each row of stop pins, means for resiliently supporting said cross-bars, a pair of ppositely arranged cams arranged to vertically reciprocate each cross-bar, and means for rotating said cams in opposite directions.

11. An article handling machine comprising an inclined floor, means arranged to form a series of inclined side-by-side raceways on said floor, means for supplying a row of articles to each of said raceways, upper and lower transverse rows of floor openings spaced longitudinally in said raceways upper and lower transverse rows of stop pins arranged for reciprocation in said upper and lower rows of floor openings respectively normal to the angle of inclination of said raceways, means for alternately raising and lowering said upper and lower rows of stop pins to periodically segregate and discharge a predetermined number of articles from all of said raceways simultaneously including transversely extending bars arranged to hold the stop pins in said rows normal to the angle of inclination of said raceways, and means for adjustably limiting the projection of said rows of stop pins into said raceways.

12. An article handling machine comprising an inclined floor, means arranged to form a series of inclined side-by-side raceways on said floor, means for supplying a row or articles to each of said raceways, upper and lower transverse rows of floor openings spaced longitudinally in said raceways, upper and lower transverse rows of stop pins arranged for reciprocation in said upper and lower rows of floor openings respectively, means for alternately raising and lowering said upper and lower rows of stop pins to periodically segregate and discharge a predetermined number of articles from all of said raceways simultaneously, and means for shifting the position of atleast one of said rows of stop pins longitudinally of said raceways to correspondingly vary the number of articles in each raceway simultaneously segregated and discharged.

13. An article handling machine comprising an inclined floor, means arranged to form a series of inclined side-by-side raceways on said floor, means for supplying a row of articles to each of said raceways, upper and lower transverse rows of floor openings spaced longitudinally in said raceways, upper and lower transverse rows of stop pins arranged for reciprocation in said upper and lower rows of floor openings, and means for alternately raising and lowering said upper and lower rows of stop pins to periodically segregate and discharge a predetermined number of articles from all of said raceways simultaneously including a cross-bar adjustably supporting each row of stop pins, a pair of oppositely arranged cams arranged to vertically reciprocate each cross-bar, means for rotating said cams in opposite directions, and means for shifting the position of at least one of said rows of stop-pins longitudinally of said raceways to correspondingly vary the number of articles in each raceway simultaneously segregated and discharged including rails at opposite sides of said machine, and oppositely arranged carriages mounted on said rails and engaging opposite ends of one of said cross-bars.

14. An article handling machine comprising an inclined floor, means arranged to form a series of inclined side-by-side raceways on said floor, means for supplying a row of articles to each of said raceways, upper and lower transverse rows of floor openings spaced longitudinally in said raceways, upper and lower transverse rows of 10 stop pins arranged for reciprocation in said upper and lower rows of floor openings respectively, means for alternately raising and lowering said upper and lower rows of stop pins to periodically segregate and discharge a predetermined number of articles from all of said raceways simultaneously including a cross-bar adjustably supporting each row of stop pins, means for resiliently supporting said cross-bars, a pair of oppositely arranged cams arranged to vertically reciprocate each cross-bar, means for rotating said cams in opposite directions, and means for shifting the position of at least one of said rows of stop pins longitudinally of said raceways to correspondingly vary the number of articles in each raceway simultaneously segregated and discharged including rails at opposite sides of said machine, oppositely arranged carriages mounted on said rails and engaging opposite ends of one of said cross-bars, and means for rotatably supporting said cams in said carriages.

15. An article handling machine comprising means arranged to form a series of inclined sideby-side raceways; means for supplying a row of freely movable articles to each of said raceways, means operative through the bottom of said raceways for simultaneously obstructing the movement of said articles at a predetermined point in each of said raceways, means for simultaneously segregating a predetermined group of said articles in each of said raceways, means for shifting one of said last two named means longitudinally of said raceways. and means for alternately rendering said obstructing and segregating means eifective.

16. An article handling machine comprising means arranged to form a series of inclined sideby-side raceways; means for supplying a row of freely movable articles to each of said raceways. means for simultaneously obstructing the movement of said articles at a predetermined point in each of said raceways, means operative through the bottom of said raceways for simultaneously segregating a predetermined group of said articles in each of said raceways, means for alternately rendering said obstructing and segregating means effective, and means for simultaneously varying the number of articles segregated in the groups in the several raceways.

GEORGE H. DANIELS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 737,568 Bingham Sept. 1, 1903 817,852 Haseltine Apr. 17, 1906 1,531,644 Brown Mar. 31, 1925 1,677,739 Townsend July 17, 1928 1,709,189 Radtke Apr. 16, 1929 1,737,023 Reaves Nov. 26, 1929 1,754,047 Reaves April 8, 1930 1,755,721 Winkler et al Apr. 22, 1930 1,844,806 Smith et al. Feb. 9, 1932 1,845,051 Latham Feb. 16, 1932 2,146,456 Thompson Feb. 7, 1939 2,358,240 Milmoe et al. Sept. 12, 1944 2,509,069 Mrachek May 23, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 299,017 Great Britain Sept. 12, 1929

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4351141 *Aug 25, 1980Sep 28, 1982J. R. Simplot CompanyCarton filling system
US7386970 *Nov 3, 2006Jun 17, 2008Dade Behring Inc.Method for dispensing tablets into a multi-compartment clinical reagent container
EP0257773A2 *Jul 17, 1987Mar 2, 1988H.G. Kalish Inc.Device for counting and loading small items into containers
EP0783697A1 *Jun 27, 1995Jul 16, 1997Bayer CorporationApparatus for orienting and loading compact medicaments
Classifications
U.S. Classification198/419.1, 53/237
International ClassificationB65B5/10, A61J7/00, A61J7/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61J7/02, B65B5/103
European ClassificationA61J7/02, B65B5/10B1