Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2617986 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 11, 1952
Filing dateJan 24, 1949
Priority dateJan 24, 1949
Publication numberUS 2617986 A, US 2617986A, US-A-2617986, US2617986 A, US2617986A
InventorsErnest B Miller
Original AssigneeJefferson Lake Sulphur Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotatable adsorption apparatus
US 2617986 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 11, 1952 Filed Jan. 24, 1949 E. B. MILLER ROTATABLE ABSORPTION APPARATUS 6 Sheets-Sheet l mum EAMEJT 5. M/LLER ATTORNEY? "Nov. 11, 1952 E, B, MILLER v 2,617,986

1 ROTATABLE ADSORPTION APPARATUS Filed Jan. 24, 1949 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNE S Nov. 11, 1952 E. B. MILLER 7,

ROTATABLE ADSORPTION APPARATUS Filed Jan. 24, 1949 s Sheets-Sheet 3 3mm fk/vasr M/LL 5/? w I WWW ATTORN EYS 1952 E. B. MILLER ROTATABLE ADSORPTION APPARATUS a Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Jan. 24, 1949 I amen whom fiwvssr B. M/LLER MYM ATTORNEYS Nov. 11, 1952 E. B. MILLER 6 ROTATABLE' ABSORPTION APPARATUS Filed Jan. 24, 1949 s Sheets-Sheet e 3mm f/PwEsr 5. MILLER ATTORNEY Patented Nov. 11, 1952 RGTATABLE ABSORPTION APPARATUS Ernest B. Miller, Houston, Tex., assignor to Jefferson Lake Sulphur Company, New Orleans, La., a corporation of New Jersey Application January 24, 1949, Serial No. 72,426

Claims.

This invention relates to fluid treating apparatus of the type in which fluids, either liquid or gaseous, are brought into contact with the treating material, either a reactant material to effect a chemical reaction, and/or an adsorbent material to absorb liquid or gaseous products from the fluid being treated, and in which the treating material is stripped of its adsorbed products and/or is regenerated for further use. The present invention has more particular reference to fluid treating apparatus of the so-called rotary or continuous type.

.One object of the present invention is to provide a rotary type fluid treating apparatus in which a plurality of foraminous, annular containers, filled with the treating material, are continuously and successively moved into and through one or more treating sectors or zones, and then into and through an activating or regenerating sector or zone in which the treating material is prepared for a repetition of the cycle.

Another object of the invention is to provide fluid treating apparatus, as characterized above, in which a large surface area of relatively thin beds of fluid treating material offering a minimum of resistance to the flow of the fluids is condensed into a small cubic space.

Another object of the invention is to provide fluid treating apparatus, as above characterized, in which bafile members are provided to insure an even flow of the fluids through the treating material, thereby making effective use of all of the treating material and increasing the efliciency and capacity of the apparatus.

Another object of the invention is to provide fluid treating apparatus, as above characterized, in which the temperature of the fluid undergoing treatment may be controlled in the various treating sectors or zones, or stages, by means of heat exchangers connected in series with and between each of such sections or zones.

A further object of the invention is to provide fluid treating apparatus, as characterized above, in which the annular containers may readily be removed and replaced.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved apparatus for conditioning air.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear in the specification when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of the fluidtreating apparatus of the invention; 1 Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the apparatus shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 33 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a horizontal sectional view of the rotatable annular drum taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged vertical sectional view of the seal shown in the upper manifold in Fig. 3;

Fig. 6 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line *6--6 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a top plan view of an annular fluid treating material container;

Fig. 8 is a vertical sectional view, with parts broken away, taken on the line 8-8 of Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is a schematic view to show the course of the fluid being treated through the first and second stages of the apparatus, and the flow of regenerating fluid through the activation stage; and

Fig. 10 is a schematic sketch showing the relation of the fluid velocities and pressures on the upstream and downstream side of a barrier in a duct.

Prior rotary fluid treating apparatus were usually of two types. One type, as shown for example in the patent to Karlsson et al., No. 2,347,829, and the patent to Campbell, No.

2,304,398, provides compartments filled with a fluid treating material. The fluid treating ma terial in each compartment is in one compact mass and ofiers high resistance to the flow of the fluids therethrough and, too, due to its compactness entraps such a quantity of the fluid being treated as to require a purging of the ma terial before it is regenerated. The other type, as

shown for example in my copending application Ser. No. 655,213, new Patent 2,507,607 issued May 16, 1950, for Method of and Apparatus for Conditioning Air, provides elongated, foraminous containers in each of the compartments for holding thin layers of the treating material. While this construction provides less resistance to the flow of the fluid therethrough and insignificant entrapment of the fluid therein, it still does not insure the uniform flow of the fluid through the fluid treating material in the foraminous containers, which results in a loss in the effective use of the material and a reduction in the capacity of the apparatus.

In general, the present invention comprises an open-ended axially compartmentized, annular rotary drum having at least one foraminous annular container filled with a fluid treating material located in each compartment; bafile mem bers associated with each container to insure uniform flow of the fluid through all of the material in the container; a pair of vertically spaced, sta-V tionary annular manifolds divided into a plurality of separate sectors by radial seals or partitions, with each sector having a fluid conduit connected thereto and having an opening therein for the passage of fluid; and means for rotating the annular drum, whereby the openings in the compartments in the drum are successively brought into communication with the openings in the corresponding sectors of the manifolds to permit the successive axial flow of fluids through the compartments of the drum.

While the apparatus of the present invention may be employed for treating fluids, either liquid or gaseous, for various purposes, it will be described, by way of illustration, as used to condition air.

In general, the rotatable compartmentized drum, the manifolds and the seals therein, and the heat exchangers are similar to that shown in my aforesaid co-pending application. However, the construction and arrangement of the foraminous containers for the fluid treating material and the baffles associated therewith are novel.

Referring now to Figs. 1, 2 and 3, there is shown a'rotatable annular drum l mounted within a suitable structural frame, shown as having four legs ll bent Over the top of the drum, each being connected to a plate carrying an upper vertical guide bearing l2 for a central vertical shaft is having a lower step bearing It mounted on cross beams l5 secured to the legs I I of the supporting frame near the bottom thereof. Upper and lower radial arms or spokes l 6 connect the shaft to the drum. Rotation of the drum is effected by means of a gear I? fixed to the shaft I3 and meshing With a gear [8, driven by any prime mover, such as a motor I9, mounted on one of the cross beams 55 near the bottom of the frame.

The rotatable annular drum is shown as being divided into a plurality of compartments 29 by radial partitions or diaphragms 2!. The top of the drum is provided with an annular opening 22 which is closed by a stationary top manifold 23 fixedly attached to the frame. Th bottom of the drum is also provided with an annular opening 24 which is closed by a stationary bottom manifold 25 fixedly attached to the cross beams [5.

To prevent the escape of air between the rotating drum and the top and bottom manifolds, sealing ring gaskets 26 are placed at the junction of the manifolds and the drum. The sealing gaskets'ZG are carried by angles 21, against which a plurality of circumferentially spaced spring plungers 28, mounted on brackets 29 attached to the manifolds, act to hold the gaskets in tight sealing engagement.

In each of the radial compartments 23, near the bottom thereof, there is rovided a plate 39 attached to the walls of the compartment, as by welding, to form a gas-tight joint. The plate 36 forms a support for one or more elongated, annular adsorbent containers 3!. The adsorbent containers 3| are identical in construction and, as best shown in Figs. '7 and 8, each comprises two concentric tubular screens 32, 33 held in spaced apart relation by a plurality of longitudinal radial fins 34, with the annular space between the screens closed at the bottom, as by a flanged annular plate 35. The mesh of the screens is such as to retain a granular fluid treating material 36 in the annular space between the screens. In the instant case, the fluid treating material 36 may be any adsorbent having characteristics substantially like silica gel or the gel of other acti- 4 vated hydrous oxides. Preferably, silica gel is used.

Each of the containers 3| is closed at its top by means of concentric hoops or metal bands 31, 38 mounted on the concentric screens 32, 33, and a cover plate 39 detachably connected to the inner hoop or band 38, as by screws, and having a depending annular flange 60 fitting between the hoops or bands 37, 38. A depending cylindrical fin t! is secured to the flange 4i] and projects downwardly between and below the hoops or bands 37, 38, and fits in slots 42 formed in the upper ends of the radial fins 34, all as shown in Figs. 7 and 8. The construction is such that, as the silica gel settles down, leaving a space between the top portion of the wire screens devoid of silica gel, the fin 4! will prevent air from passing through that space.

Mounted within the inner wire screen 33 is an inverted substantially conically shaped bafile member 43, as best seen in Fig. 8. The baflle member is closed at its apex which extends downwardly to a point near the bottom of the container and has its upper peripheral edge suitably secured to the band 38, as by welding. Preferably, the baffle member 43 is made of thin sheet metal. 7

Each container has its bottom end detachably mounted in a socket formed on plate 30, as by means of a ring collar 44, welded thereon. The bottoms of the sockets have openings 45 formed therein which correspond in size and are aligned with the open bottom ends of the annular adsorbent contains, as clearly shown in Fig. 3.

In each of the radial compartments 25!, near the top thereof, there is provided a plate 46 attached to the walls of the compartment, as by welding, to form a gas-tight joint.

Mounted in each of the compartments 20 and extending between the bottom plate 30 and the upper plate 45 therein, is a substantially frustoconically shaped baffle member 41, one for each of the annular containers mounted in the compartment. The bafile member 41 encompasses the annular container 3| and has its upper peripheral edge secured to the edge of a circular opening 48 formed in the upper plate 46, as by welding, and has its lower peripheral edge secured to the upper peripheral edge of the ring collar 6!; on the lower plate 30, as by welding. It should be noted that the annular space between the outer frusto-conical bafiie 4! and the inner conical baffle 43 forms an open ended conduit or duct and that the annular bed of adsorbent material forms a barrier extending longitudinally across the duct, all as shown in Fig, 3. The particular function of the bafiie members 43 and 41 will be hereinafter pointed out.

At three spaced circumferential points in the top and bottom manifolds there are located seals 49 arranged in vertically aligned pairs which, by reason of the sliding contact of the radial partitions 2| against the under face of the bottom of the seals, divides the manifolds and drum into three sectors or zones, each sector being gastight with respect to the adjacent sectors. The seals are identical in construction and the details thereof are best shown in Figs. 5 and 6.

Each seal is shown as being mounted between partition Walls 50 extending across the manifold. The top or cover plate 5| of the seal is detachably secured to the manifold, as by bolts. The bottom of the seal rests on the top or bottom of the drum, as the case may be, and includes a sealing plate 52 having upturned flanges on it ends adapted to fit against the partition walls 50 and having its under surface, in-

cluding the flanges, covered with a layer of sheet asbestos or rubber material 53 to engage the ends of the radial partitions. The arrangement is such that the seals can be easily removed so that the asbestos liners can be inspected and replaced. In addition, the top seals provide openings through which the annular adsorbent containers 3| can readily be removed for renewal orrepair. The bottom or sealing plate 52 of the seal is adjustably held in position against the drum, as by means of stems 54 fixed thereto and extending upwardly through U-shaped brackets 55 bolted to the side walls of the manifold. Coil springs 56, mounted on the stems between the arms of the bracket, press against discs 51 fixedly attached to the stems to urge the stems and'bottom plate downward.

Each radial partition or diaphragm 2lhas that portion of its top and bottom edges extending between the edges of the openings in the top and bottom of the drum, covered by a strip 58 of reinforced asbestos cloth or other suitable sealing material folded thereon and detachably secured thereto, as by bolted clamping strips 59. This asbestos strip engages the under side of the seal, as best shown in Fig. 6.

The width of the seal with respect to the compartments 20 containing the adsorbent units is such that at all times at least one of the partitions or diaphragms 2| is engaging the sealing plate of the seal in air-tight engagement. As is clearly seen from the foregoing, the air dehydrating unit is divided into three gas-tight sectors or zones by the engagement of the radial partitions or diaphragms with the seals. I

As the drum carrying the annular adsorbent containers rotates, they are continuously and successively moved through the three sectors or zones, called, for convenience, the first stage, the second stage, and the activation stage. The flow of the air through the first and second dehydration stages and the flow of the hot gases through the activation stage is schematically shown in Fig. 9. The outside air from which moisture is to be removed is supplied to the airdehydrating unit at a sufiicient pressure to force it through the system and enters the top manifold of the first stage by means of the conduit 65. Then it flows from the manifold through the opening in the top of the drum into the various. compartments of the drum containing those adsorber beds which are at that time contained within the sector forming the first stage. The air passes downwardly into the frusto-conical baffle 41, through the pervious layers of adsorbent material, which removes part of the moisture content therefrom, into the interior of the annular adsorber beds; thence, downward through the openings in plate 39 into the bottom of the drum and through the opening therein into the bottom manifold. From the bottom manifold, the now partially dried air passes through conduit 6| into a heat exchanger or intermediate cooler '62, where it is cooled to about room temperature. The cooler 62 may be of the water-circulating type. From the intermediate cooler, the air moves, by means of conduit 53, which extends underneath the device and up one side to the top thereof, into that portion of the top manifold leading to the second stage, The air moves downwardly through the second sta e. in a manner similar to' its downward movement through the first stage, into the bottom manifold of'thesecond stage, the remainder of the moisture content of the air being removed during its passage through the second stage.

From the bottom manifold of the second stage, the now dried air moves through conduit 64 into a second heat exchanger or cooler 65, where it is cooled to the desired room use temperature. The cooler 65 may also be of the water-circulating type. From the second cooler 65, the now dehydrated and cooled air is conveyed through conduit 66, to the various points of use.

The removal of moisture from the adsorbent material carried by the adsorber units is effected in the activation stage. Atmospheric air is forced by a fan 61 through a heater 68, then through conduit 6E! into the bottom manifold of the activation stage. From the bottom manifold the :hot air passes through the opening in the drum into the bottom of such of the various compartments of the drum as are at that time contained within the sector forming the activation stage; thence upwardly through the openings in the plates 30 and up into the interior of the annular adsorber units, through the pervious solid layer of adsorbent material into the interior of the frusto-conical bafile 41, and then into the upper portion of the compartments of the drum. As the hot air passes through the adsorbent material it removes the moisture therefrom. The hot moisture-laden air then passes upwardly through the opening in the top of the drum into the top manifoldand from the top manifold is exhausted into the atmosphere through conduit 10.

The operation of the device is as follows:

With the annular drum continuously and slowly revolving counterclockwise, as viewed from the top, the adsorbent container beds are successively moved through the first stage, then through the activation stage, and then through the second stage. The wet air to be dehydrated is first passed through the first stage, then through the intermediate cooler into and through the second stage, where the remaining moisture is removed by the freshly dried adsorbent material. From the second stage, the now dried air is passed through a second cooler and then conducted to the points of use. The use of a second cooler may be omitted, if desired, and the air discharged directly to the points of use.

The baffles 43 and 41 insure substantially uniform flow of fluid through the silica gel in the annular containers, whether the flow of fluid is downward, as in the case of the air being dehydrated, or upward as in the case of the heated activating medium,

The-movement of a fluid from one part of a system to another depends upon differences of static pressure, The fluid will flow from a regiOn of higher static pressure to one of lower static pressure. The pressure difference may be very slight for a low velocity movement, or it may be considerable for high velocity movement of fluid.

The total pressure of a body of moving fluid is made up of two components: static pressure and velocity pressure. The velocity component is the pressure equivalent of the energy required to keep the fluid in motion. Velocity pressures are very low in slow moving fluids but increase in proportion to the square of the velocity so that rapidly moving fluids have considerable velocity pressure.

The'totalpressure of a given body ofmoving fluid in a short duct will not be appreciablydif- ;ferent. for any part :of the duct, but if the velocity changes at any point, due to a'change in cross sectional area of the duct,-the velocity component will change, causing a complementary change in the static pressure component.

Where the flow of a fluid is to be directed through a barrier of large-area and low resistance at a slow velocity, only a slight difference in static pressure willbe needed. Consequently, there will be only a small difference in the total pressure on'either'side of the barrier. If the fluid approaches and leaves the barrier at-high velocities, the velocity component of the total pressure maybe as much as or more than the static component. If this velocity pressure component varies considerably overthe face of the barrier,

the static pressure component which governs the flow through the barrier will also vary, resulting in unequal distribution'of flow over the face of the barrier.

If a uniform flow distribution through the barrier is required, it is essential thatno substan tial differences in velocity pressure exist-in the fluid along the face of the barriereither on the upstream or the downstream side.

As above pointed out, the elongated annular space between the innerand outer baflies 43, l! forms an elongated duct which is annular in cross section. The elongated annular adsorbent containerfilled with silica gel is positioned in the duct between the baffle members in such 'manner that it forms a barrier extending diagonally across the ductfrom top to bottom.

The diameter of the bases and the tapers of the side wallsof the bafiie members 43, 4'! are such that the cross sectional area of the duct formed between the two members is substantially equal at its top and bottom. The tapers of the side walls of thetwo baffle members are such that a substantially uniform velocity is obtained on both sides of the barrieras fluid is transferred from the upstream to the downstream side, regardless of the direction of flow, thereby creating a substantially constant static headover the faceof the barrier, resulting in a substantially uniform distribution of the fluid through the entire barrier area.

This is diagrammatically illustrated in Fig. 10, where the downstream and upstream portions of the duct formed by the Walls ofthe frusto-conical bafilesd3 and Mare shown with thetubular'container filled with silica gel formin the barrier B.

Pris the total pressure on the upstream side of barrier.

P2 is the total pressure on the downstream side of barrier.

Srand S2 are the static pressure components at the inlet and outlet ends on'the upstream-side of the barrier.

V1 and V2 are the corresponding velocity pressure components.

S3, S4, V3 and V4 represent the analogous condition on the downstream side'ofthe barrier.

The'upstream and downstream ducts'adjacent to the barrier are tapered so'that a oonstant'velocity is obtained on bothsides of the barrieras fluid is transferred from the upstream tothe downstream side. In effect, V1=V2 and V3=V4, so that $1 and S2 differ from P1 in the same degree, and S3 and S4 differ from P2 in the same degree. The static head is thus a constant value over the face'of the barrier,-resulting inasub- .stantially uniform distribution of fluid through the entirebarrier area.

Thus, it will beseen that by using the bafiie members the entire barrier area ismade full use of with resultant increases inefficiency, capacity and economy.

While the invention has been described as having the annular drum rotating counterclockwise, obviously, the device would be operable with the annular drum rotating clockwise, by changing the positions of the'stages. Further, while only one activating stageis shown, obviously, a second activating stage could be used between the first and second dehydrating stages, and, further, the various stages could be multiplied and combined in various manners.

Obviously, the invention is not restricted to the particular embodiment'thereof herein shown and described. Moreover, it'is not indispensable that all of the features of the invention be used conjointly, since they may be employed advantageously in various combinations and sub-combinations.

What is claimed is:

1. In an apparatus for treating fluids, the

combination comprising a frame; an annular drum having annular openings in its top and bottom rotatably mounted therein; a plurality of vertical partitions mounted in said drum dividing it into a plurality of radial compartments; a vertically spaced pair of'transversely extending partitions mounted in each compartment and forming a gas-tight'joint with the walls thereof; at least one open-ended.frusto-conically shaped baffle member mountedin each of said compartments and extending between the upper and the lower transverse partitions and providing a fluid passage between the top and bottom of the compartment; an elongated annular foraininous fluid treating material container mounted in each baflie member, :said container being closed 'at its top and having itshollow interior at its bottom end opening into the bottom of the conduit and having an inverted conically shaped bafile member mounted in its hollowinterior with the base of the conicall-yshaped baffle secured to the container adjacent its .top end and the apex extending to a point adjacent its bottom end, the construction being such that the annular 'spacebetweenthe baffle members forms an elongated frusto-c-onically shaped conduit annular in cross section withlthe container forming a barrier extending longitudinally across the conduit from the top to the-bottom, and with the taper of the side walls of theconduit being such that the cross'sectional area of the conduit on each side of the barrier varies soas to maintain a substantially constant velocity of the fluid on either side of the barrier throughout its extent regardless of the direction of flow of fluid in the conduit resulting in uniform flow through the entire barrier'area; an-upper annularmanifold fixedly mounted on said frame andcommunicating with the opening in the top of the drum; a lower annular manifoldfixedly mounted on the frame and communicating with the opening in the bottom of the drum; a plurality of seals located in each of said manifolds and cooperating with said partitions to divide the drum and the manifolds into a plurality of sectors, each sector being gas-tight with respect to its adjacent sector;

.and means for rotating the drum whereby said compartments with the containers are continuously and successively movedthrough each of -said sectors.

2. In an apparatus for conditioning air, the combination comprising a frame; an annular drum having annular openings in its top and bottom rotatably mounted therein; a plurality of vertical partitions mounted in said drum dividing it into a plurality of radial compartments; a vertically spaced pair of transversely extending partitions mounted in each compartment and forming a gas-tight joint with the walls thereof; at least one open-ended frusto-conically shaped baffle member mounted in each of said compartments and extending between the upper and the lower transverse partitions and providing a fluid passage between the top and bottom of the compartment; an elongated annular foraminous adsorbent container mounted in each baflle member, said container being closed at its top and having its hollow interior at its bottom end opening into the bottom of the conduit and having an inverted conically shaped baffle member mounted in its hollow interior with the base of the conically shaped bafile secured to the container adJacent its top end and with the apex extending to a point adjacent its bottom end, the construction being such that the annular space between the baflie members forms an elongated frusto-conically shaped conduit an- I nular in cross section with the container forming a barrier extending longitudinally across the conduit from the top to the bottom, and with the taper of the side walls of the conduit being such that the cross sectional area or the conduit on each side of the barrier varies so as to maintain a. substantially constant velocity of the fluid on either side of the barrier throughout its extent regardless of the direction of flow of fluid in the conduit resulting in uniform flow through the entire barrier area; an upper annular mamiold fixedly mounted on said frame and communicating with the opening in the top of the drum; a lower annular manifold fixedly mounted on the frame and communicating with the opening in the bottom of the drum; a plurality or seals located in each of said maniioids and cooperating with said partitions to divide the drum and the manifolds into a plurality of sectors, each sector being gas-tight with respect to its ad acent sector; means for passing heated gases through one of said sectors; means for passing air to be dehumidified in succession through the other of said sectors; and means for rotating the drum whereby said compartments with the containers are continuously and successively moved through each of said sectors.

3. In fluid treating apparatus of the type wherein the fluid to be treated is caused to pass through at least one conduit having a spaced pair or openings therein and conta ning granular fluid treating material capable or eiiecting the desired treatment, the improvement which comprises a foraminous container for holding the granular fluid treating material, said container being mounted in said conduit between said openings and positioned to act as a barrier through which the fluid flowing through the conduit must pass, said barrier extend ng longitudinaily and diagonally oi the conduit iroin one side wall to the opposite side wall and dividing it into two oppositely tapered passageways with the cross sectional area 01 each passageway constantly decreasing from its large end toward its small end and the areas at their larger ends being substantially equal so as to maintain a substantially constant velocity of the fluid on either side of the barrier throughout its extent, regardless of the direction of flow of the fluid, resulting in a substantially uniform flow throughout the entire barrier area.

4. An apparatus for treating fluid comprising a rotary member having a plurality of axially extending fluid conduits therein, each of said conduits having a spaced pair of openings formed therein; a foraminous container mounted in each of said conduits between said openings, each of said containers being adapted to hold a granular fluid treating material and being mounted in its respective conduit to act as a barrier through which fluid flowing through the conduit must pass, said barrier extending longitudinally and diagonally of the conduit from one side wall to the opposite side wall and dividing it into two oppositely tapered passageways with the cross sectional area of each passageway constantly decreasing from its large end toward its small end and the areas at their larger ends being substantially equal so as to maintain a substantially constant velocity of the fluid on either side of the barrier throughout its extent, regardless of the direction of now of the fluid, resulting in a substantially uniform flow throughout the entire barrier area; and a pair of vertically spaced, stationary, annular manifolds having radial partitions therein dividing them into a plurality of separate corresponding sectors, each of said sectors having a fluid conduit communicating therewith and having an opening therein for the pas sage of fluid; said manifolds being mounted to .slidably engage said rotary member as it rotates and being positioned so that the vertically spaced openings in said conduits will be brought successiveiy into communication with th openings in the corresponding sectors of the vertically spaced manifolds respectively, as the rotary member rotates, whereby successive axial flows of fluid will take place through the conduits in the rotary member as said rotary member rotates.

5. Apparatus for treating fluid, as set forth in claim 4, wherein the conduits are frusto-conical and are annular in cross section; and wherein the foraminous containers are tubular and are annular in cross section.

ERNEST B. MILLER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the flle of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,922,688 Kamrath Aug. 15, 1933 1,995,292 Clark Mar. 26, 1935 2,053,159 Miller Sept. 1, 1936 2,329,847 McCansland Sept. 21, 1943 2,421,705 Kasten June 3, 1947 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 8,738 Great Britain July 20, 1885 415,801 Great Britain Dec. 6, 193

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1922688 *Jun 10, 1929Aug 15, 1933Ac Spark Plug CoMultistage type air cleaner
US1995292 *Sep 5, 1929Mar 26, 1935American Cyanamid & Chem CorpManufacture of sulphuric acid
US2053159 *Feb 16, 1932Sep 1, 1936Davison Chemical CorpAdsorber and system
US2329847 *May 9, 1941Sep 21, 1943Universal Oil Prod CoCatalytic reactor
US2421705 *Feb 16, 1943Jun 3, 1947Ralph L SkinnerFilter
GB415801A * Title not available
GB188508738A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2675885 *Aug 11, 1952Apr 20, 1954E & J Mfg CompanyAbsorber for anesthetic gas machines
US2706532 *Mar 26, 1953Apr 19, 1955Adsorption Res CorpFluid treating apparatus
US2708519 *Jan 30, 1953May 17, 1955Ohio Commw Eng CoChromatographic adsorption apparatus with eluting solvent flow control valve
US2709525 *Sep 2, 1950May 31, 1955Houdaille Hershey Of Indiana IRetaining plate and screen assembly for clarifiers
US2715569 *Jun 3, 1954Aug 16, 1955Sun Oil CoRotary converter sealing devices
US2751034 *Oct 17, 1952Jun 19, 1956Adsorption Res CorpFluid treating apparatus
US2781913 *Jan 21, 1955Feb 19, 1957Malcolm W ThompsonGas and liquid filter/separator
US2928495 *Apr 13, 1959Mar 15, 1960Jefferson Lake Sulphur CoFluid treating container for use in fluid treating apparatus
US3038326 *Jun 2, 1958Jun 12, 1962Phillips Petroleum CoChromatographic analyzer
US3197944 *Aug 7, 1961Aug 3, 1965Hayes Inc C IRotary adsorber having intermittent movement
US3246961 *Aug 21, 1963Apr 19, 1966Air PreheaterCatalyst carrier with back purge
US3404780 *Jul 29, 1965Oct 8, 1968Centraia AutomationslaboratoriAutomatic filter
US3434599 *Apr 28, 1967Mar 25, 1969Sporlan Valve CoFilter-drier unit
US3458047 *Aug 18, 1968Jul 29, 1969Eugene B WhiteFilter cell
US3490879 *Aug 30, 1966Jan 20, 1970Universal Oil Prod CoFluid-solid contacting apparatus utilizing plural rotor members containing contact masses
US3615196 *May 5, 1969Oct 26, 1971Exxon Research Engineering CoProcess for the purification of flue gas
US3762554 *Feb 4, 1972Oct 2, 1973Wallover Oil CoContinuously regenerating active earth filtering apparatus for liquid wastes
US4046525 *Jul 31, 1975Sep 6, 1977Toyobo Co., Ltd.Method for adsorbing harmful substance
US4409006 *Dec 7, 1981Oct 11, 1983Mattia Manlio MRemoval and concentration of organic vapors from gas streams
US4452612 *Sep 22, 1982Jun 5, 1984Cubemco, Inc.Separation and purification of gases and vapors by continuous pressure-swing adsorption
US4522726 *Jul 30, 1984Jun 11, 1985Progress Equities IncorporatedAdvanced separation device and method
US4695386 *May 20, 1985Sep 22, 1987Advanced Separation Technologies IncorporatedProcess for the decolorization of pulp mill process streams
US4695387 *May 7, 1985Sep 22, 1987Advanced Separation Technologies IncorporatedRemoval of ammonia from wastewater
US4758349 *Mar 12, 1987Jul 19, 1988Ma Hsien ChihSeparation process for biological media
US4764276 *Mar 19, 1985Aug 16, 1988Advanced Separation Technologies IncorporatedDevice for continuous contacting of fluids and solids
US4775484 *Mar 9, 1987Oct 4, 1988Life Systems, Inc.Method and apparatus for the continuous separation of contaminants from a fluid mixture
US4778492 *Feb 19, 1987Oct 18, 1988Advanced Separation Technologies IncorporatedContinuous gas treatment method and apparatus for adsorption processes
US4999033 *May 31, 1989Mar 12, 1991Bry-Air, Inc.Integrally valved, low friction indexing desiccant bed dehumidifier
US5200074 *Oct 8, 1991Apr 6, 1993Kirin Beer Kabushiki KaishaIon-exchange apparatus having rotatable cartridges
US5464468 *Dec 6, 1993Nov 7, 1995Taikisha Ltd.Rotary adsorption/desorption gas treating apparatus
US5628819 *Sep 28, 1995May 13, 1997Calgon Carbon CorporationMethod and apparatus for continuous adsorption of adsorbable contaminates and adsorber regeneration
US6280623 *Mar 23, 1999Aug 28, 2001Hsien-Chih MaDifferential and continuous separation apparatus with controlled parameters for solids and liquids
US6576137 *Jul 3, 2000Jun 10, 2003Hsien-Chih MaDifferential and continuous separation process with controlled paramenters for solids and liquids
US6780227 *Oct 12, 2001Aug 24, 2004Emprise Technology Associates Corp.Method of species exchange and an apparatus therefore
US7966742 *May 4, 2007Jun 28, 2011Daniel Mac BrownAir dryer for ozone aided combustion
US8087516 *Jun 2, 2009Jan 3, 2012Battelle Memorial InstituteSystem and process for treatment of a contaminated fluid
US8500851 *Aug 31, 2009Aug 6, 2013Phillips 66 CompanyMultiple fixed-fluidized beds for contaminant removal
US8685151Aug 5, 2013Apr 1, 2014Lummus Technology Inc.Multiple fixed-fluidized beds for contaminant removal
US20020071979 *Oct 12, 2001Jun 13, 2002Dubose Ronald ArthurMethod of species exchange and an apparatus therefore
US20070258870 *May 4, 2007Nov 8, 2007Daniel Mac BrownAir Dryer for Ozone Aided Combustion
US20100115839 *Aug 31, 2009May 13, 2010Conocophillips CompanyMultiple Fixed-Fluidized Beds for Contaminant Removal
US20100300975 *Dec 2, 2010Battelle Memorial InstituteSystem and Process for Treatment of a Contaminated Fluid
US20120324756 *Mar 2, 2011Dec 27, 2012Wittmann Kunststoffgeraete GmbhDevice for drying bulk goods
US20130000143 *Mar 2, 2011Jan 3, 2013Wittmann Kunststoffgeraete GmbhMethod for drying bulk material
EP0200834A2 *Nov 29, 1985Nov 12, 1986Advanced Separation Technologies IncorporatedRemoval of ammonia from wastewater
EP0202382A2 *Nov 29, 1985Nov 26, 1986Advanced Separation Technologies IncorporatedProcess for the decolourization of pulp mill process streams
EP0480395A1 *Oct 8, 1991Apr 15, 1992Kirin Beer Kabushiki KaishaApparatus for separating and purifying material
EP0627252A1 *Dec 10, 1993Dec 7, 1994Taikisha, Ltd.Rotary adsorption/desorption gas treating apparatus
WO1988006913A1 *Mar 3, 1988Sep 22, 1988Life Systems, Inc.Method and apparatus for the continuous separation of contaminants from a fluid mixture