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Publication numberUS2618099 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 18, 1952
Filing dateAug 3, 1948
Priority dateAug 3, 1948
Publication numberUS 2618099 A, US 2618099A, US-A-2618099, US2618099 A, US2618099A
InventorsSamet Frank I
Original AssigneeSamet Frank I
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy with magnetically controlled response
US 2618099 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 18, 1952 -r 2,618,099

TOY WITH MAGNETICALLY CONTROLLED RESPONSE Filed Aug. 3, 1948 Ila,

INVENTOR. FFMWK l: 517M157 A TTO/QNEY Patented Nov. 18, 1952 TOY -WITH MAGNETICALLY coNrrRoLLnn RESPONSE Fran k I. Sat net, New York, N. Y.

Application Augustli, 1948, Serial-No. 42,201

13 Claims. 1

This invention relates to toys having magnetically controlled responses. 7 V i It is an object of my invention to provide a toy of the character described which incorporates a type of magnetic response.

More specifically, it is anobject ofmy invention to provide a toy of the character described constituting a stationary member and two movable members, of which one is magnetically controlled, wherein the two movable members may experience a limited relative movement, and thereafter will move together, sothat a novel and amusing efiect is secured.

Itis another object of my invention to provide a toy of the character described which comprises relatively few and simple parts, and has a simple, rugged and durable construction.

It is a further object of my invention to provide a toy of the character described which is capable of seemingly differentiating between two persons one of which is familiar with its principle of operation.

It is anadditional object of my invention to provide a toy of the character described in the form of an animal with a pivotally mounted head andmovable eyes, wherein the eyes can be made to roll within a limited compass while the head is stationary, and beyond that will move the head with them.

It is yet another object of my invention to pro,- vide a toy of the character describedwhose head and eyes will follow a simulated desired object when the object is held in a certain manner, but which will turn away from or be repelled by the same object held in a different manner.

It is still another object of my invention to provide a toy animal of the character described in conjunction with an enclosure, wherein the animal will follow with its head, eyes and body (if the latter is present) a simulated desired object properly held in propinquity thereto and thus will emerge from the enclosure, but which will retreat into the enclosure if the .desired object is held diiierently.

Other objects of my invention will in part be obvious and in part will be pointed out hereinafter.

My invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combinations of elements and arrangements of parts which will be exemplified in the device hereinafter described and of which the .scope of application will be indicated in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings .in which is shown one of the various possible embodiments of my invention,

Fig. 1 is a front view of a toy dog and dog house constructed in accordance with my invention;

Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken substantially along the linej-l ofFig. -1 and also showing in 2 section a bone-shaped object used to manipulate the dog;

Fig. 3 is a reduced sectional view taken substantially along the line 3-3 of Fig. 2, the same being illustrative of the details of the means for permitting the dog to move in and out of its house;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 4--4 of Fig. 2 and illustrative of the movable eye mechanism;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view takensubstantially along the line 5-5 of Fig. 2 and illustrating the support for the dogs head; and

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to Fig. 2 but showing the-dogfs eyes in a differeent position corresponding to a new position of the bone-shaped object.

In general, I carry out my invention by rotatably mounting a hollow, non-magnetic toy head on a supporting element. Desirably, the axis of rotation of the head is inclined somewhat to the vertical so that the head will seek a predetermined position of rest when idle. Optionally, the head mounting additionally may be such as to permit rotation of the head about a horizontal axis so that the head can swivel. Within the head I provide an eye member-which is mounted so as to be movable relative to the head, said eye member being supported upon the head supporting element (or, equivalently, upon an ,element movable with the head supporting element.) so that the eye member is movable independently of the head. In the preferred form of myinven- .tion, the supportingelement for the eye member constitutes a continuation of a spindle which comprises the supporting element for-[the head. The eye member is located in baclgof one or more eye openings in the head so that upon movement of said member, the eyes will experience a move ment relative to the head, can be madeto open orclose the eyes, or can be caused to roll.

Moreover, the head and eye member are pr-o- .vided with cooperating abutment portions for limiting relative movement of the eye member with respect to the head so that if the eyes'are urged to move beyond their predetermined-limit with-respect tothe head, they will cause the head to movewith them.

The eye member carriesa magnet whose polar axis (the axis joining the north and sou poles), is normal to the forehead. This magnet cooper: ates with one or more magnets in an .exteripr object such as a simulated bone. The exterior object preferably is elongated and has one of each of its magnets adjacent a difierentfend ofthe object, said magnet or magnets having their polar axes arranged parallel to the longitudinal axis of theobject.

With this arrangement, when the exterior objcct is approached to the toy head and a pole of the object magnet is brought into propinquity with the forwardly extending pole of the head magnet, the eye member will swing in one of two ways, depending upon which pole of the exterior object is approached to the toy head. If the pole of the object magnet is of the opposite polarity from the forward pole of the head magnet, the head magnet will follow movement of the ex terior object. Should the exterior object be moved upwardlly, the eye member will move up with it. When the exterior object is rolled, the eye member will roll with it. When the exterior object is moved from side to side, the eye member will move with it, and, if the movement from side to side is extensive enough, the eye member will cause the head to move from side to side. In general, when the eye member moves to a limit of'its travel with respect to the head and the mounting of the head is such as to permit movement of the latter in the same direction, continued movement of the eye member will move the head in such direction when the exterior object is properly handled.

If the pole of the object magnet is of the same polarity as the forward pole of the head magnet, the head magnet will be repelled upon approach of the object magnet, so that when the exterior object is brought near the head, the head will move away from the exterior object. This will have the effect of causing the head to swing away from the exterior object and thus appear to refuse to accept the same.

I may enhance the attractiveness of the toy by mounting the head supporting element in such fashion that it too is permitted movement, preferably in a horizontal plane. With such an arrangement if the forward pole of the magnet in the exterior object has a polarity opposite to that of the forward pole of the magnet in the toy head, not only will the toy head swing after the exterior object as it is moved from side-to-side, but the head also will reciprocate as a whole as the exterior object is moved back and forth.

Conversely, with this mounting of the head support-element, reversal of the exterior object will cause the head to retreat from the exterior object as the latter advances, in addition to being repelled to one side or another.

Back-and-forth movement of the toy, as distinguished from side-to-side movement, may be taken advantage of to make the toy even more fascinating. This is accomplished by employing an enclosure, for instance a house or fence, into or out of which the toy can move through a suitable opening by proper manipulation of the exterior object. Thus, when the exterior object is properly approached to the toy as if to offer the same thereto, the toy will move out of the enclosure, but when the exterior object is reversed and approached to the toy, the toy will retreat into the enclosure.

Referring now in detail to the drawings, the reference numberal l8 denotes a toy constructed in accordance with my invention. Said toy includes a thin-walled hollow dogs head !2, constructed from a light non-magnetic material such for instance as papier-mach or a synthetic plastic. The head preferably is shaped to provide a substantial snout I l and the underside of the head is entirely open. Said head is provided with a pair of eye openings i6 above the snout and below the forehead ll.

The head is supported on a spindle it which, as best shown in Fig. 2, is inclined forwardly at a slight angle to the vertical, e. g. 30. The

spindle includes a lower portion 29 of greatest diameter, an intermediate portion 22 of lesser diameter and a top portion 24 of smallest diameter, the spindle being shouldered where these portions join. To facilitate mounting of the head on the spindle in such fashion as to allow rotation of the head about the longitudinal axis thereof, said head is provided with a sheet metal bridge 25 (see Fig. 5). This bridge consists of a strip 28 which spans the interior of the head in the region of the ears and has its ends suitably fixed thereto as by disposition in opposed registered slots 30 formed in the head. The strip is held in position in a conventional manner, as by being wedged in the slots or by having a drop of glue 32 deposited at the lower ends of the slots after the strip has been positioned.

At the center of the strip I provide a pair of integral, rearwardly extending, parallel, vertically spaced ears 33, 34 which are provided with registered apertures 36, 38 of proper size to rotatably receive the intermediate spindle portion 22. The lower aperture 36 may be just slightly larger than said portion, e. g., .095 of an inch, and the upper aperture 38 is elongated in a front-to-back direction (see Fig. 5), thus enabling the head to turn about the longitudinal axis of the spindle i8 and additionally to permit a limited rotation of the head about a horizontal axis so that the head can experience a swivelling motion.

The head also includes suitable eyes. In the form of my invention shown herein, the eyes comprise a flat sheet metal plate Ell (Fig. 4) having replicas 42 of a dogs eyes on its front surface. An conventional method of forming these eyes may be employed, as for example, printing, etching, hand-painting or decalcomanias. The eyes are smaller than the eye openings and are spaced apart a distance between the centers equal to the distance between the centers of the eye openings. Said plate may be of a generally rectangular outline as indicated in Fig. i and is provided with an opening 44 disposed on the vertical center line of the plate for a purpose which soon will be apparent. The upper edge of the opening has an integral rearwardly extending lug 66 which is formed with a through aperture G8. The plate is disposed immediately in back of the eye openings, and, for convenience, this portion of the dogs head is made flat and vertical at its interior surface.

Said plate is carried by a sheet metal lever 50 which swivels on the spindle 18. The lever has a pair of laterally extending, parallel, vertically spaced ears 52, 53 which are provided with a set of registered apertures 56, 58. The lower aperture 56 is slightly, e. g., .005 of an inch, larger than the diameter of the upper spindle portion 24. The upper aperture 58 is elongated in a front-to-back direction whereby said lever can turn about the longitudinal axis of the spindle l8 and rock about a horizontal axis. The end of the lever 50 in back of the spindle carries a counterweight 6t! which counterbalances all the elements carried on the forward end of the spindle. The lever is captively retained on the spindle by a, nut 62 screwed on to the threaded tip of the spindle.

The forward end of the lever has an upwardly extending tine 64 which is received in the opening @8 of the eye plate 40. This opening lies on the vertical center line of the plate and preferably is in back of the center of gravity of said plate, whereby the plate tilts forwardly and rests against the interior surface of the forehead. The

acre-tee The*forward end of the lever 50 also supports a'bar magnet 662 In the preferred form-of myinvention, this magnet is made from a-highlymagnetic'material, for example, Alnico IV; 1 Any: suitable, connection maybe employed to mount the bar; magnet on the lever. For-'instance;-the'- lever' may be provided with a' pair of laterally-ex tending flanges 68$ '10- (Fig.4) which-embrace the'i top and bottom-edges of the-' magnet and which have vertically I extend in legs- 12 engag pole" (in this instance the south-.p'olel f the magnet extends well into the snout: l 4 and desireably is disposed immediately adjacent the interior surface ofthesnout. Inorder to enable this=pole of the magnet to maintain such a position with respectto the forward wall of the snout, the interior surface of the snout may be. given an arcuate" configuration in this region centering about the opening 56.: Optionally, and in or.- der to prevent side sway of the. eye plate, the opening- 44 may. include a notch M in its lower edge. This notch slidably. receives a downwardly extending-rib 16 integral with the lever .50.:

I prefer to have all of the movable elements,

except the magnet, madenof a light metal or.

material, forinstance, aluminum or an aluminum alloy, in order to keep the weight of the head asv low as possible, whereby thehead and; eyes are more easily movable by magnetic force.

Although it is within the, scope .of my, invention simply. to mount the .spindle ,l8 within the stationary body of an animal so that the head rotates. on a neck. a more, engaging result is obtained by. mounting. the spindlein the, manner illustrated in the drawings. As there shown, the

spindlelis secured on a bar 18-. Said baris supportedin such fashiongthat it can reciprocate in a horizontal plane. Tothis end, the forward and rear,portions of thebar are pivotally mounted on whoseother ends are pivotally fastened to a base plate;v 84-; The distance; between the points of pivotalmounting of the links on the base plate is'about equal to the distance between thepoints of. pivot attachment, of the links t .the; bar,

whereby-When the bari-s reciprocated itwill re front,v back and sidewalls and peaked roof. The

front wall of the dog house has an opening Bl! through which the head 12 extendsand can move. Asbest seen in Fig.2 the bar 18 is so located that when in its' foremost position, defined by abutmentjof the front link 80 against a stop 92 onthe base plate, said bar is located onthe fronttoback center lineofthe dog house. Likewise, when the bar, is inits extreme rearmostposition, defined by abutment of the back link 82against a pond stop, 8 th b i o the f n -t -b 'c center line of the dog house. The links 80, -82

desirably are -madfabout -a's long as possiblei without being" exposed, in'orderthat the sideside movement of the bar will "be unno-ticeablek In the foremost' position" of; the-bar, the i-ie'adeX- tends almost all the way out" of the dog-house seen-in Fig 2 and in the-rearmostposition of the bar only the tip of the snout projects through said opening.

In order to move the 'headr-I provide seem terior, free, manually manipulatable memberzllfiz which simulates an object attractive: to the toy animal in the "enclosures In the form :of: :my; invention herein described, :this obj ecta is a :bone; and the" same may befashioned-ifromi-any suite: able selfeform-maintaining: materialifor; instance papierrmch or cl ay.-. Theobjectgflt houses one, or two magnets ,98, I 0.0 which are so --pla ced;that only a single pole of ;amagnet is adjacent; an. end of the object. If the objectis elongated and. two magnets are used, as is thecase here, one. pole,- for example-the north pole, ofone mag net; is located-"adjacent one; end of the object, and the opposite pole of the other magnet is} located adjacent the oppositeend .of the ,obje'ctl' In addition, the'magnetsmay have-their polarj axes aligned and parallel to the longitudinal, axis; of the object. ,7 I

v In using the toy, one end of'the free exterior object is approached .to'thesn'out of the animal.

If the end of the object. presented has a magnetic pole ofopp'osite'polarity tothe pole o'fthe head magnet 66' and the object is' approached close enough to the snout, the force of, magnetic attraction will cause the head magnet to ap proach the object, and, if the object ismove'd;

tofollow thesame. Should the head,-when-a'ppreached by the object 96 be within the -do'g house, and should the object thereafter be'mov'ed away from the dog house the head 'will follow the object out of the dog house; If, when the head is either inside of, partly out ofj or' a'sf fa-r out of the dog house as itcan move, the object- 96 is moved up and down the magnet will move up and down with it,-causing the eyes to openor close.

Itmaybe mentioned herethat the counterweight 60 either may be so adjusted as to havethe eyes normally below the eyeopenings: l6 orat the level'of said eye openings. If normally below, and ifthe object is approached-to the head near the tip of the snout, the eyes will open. If the object is moved from side-to-side' when held at-the properlevel to keep the eyes open, the eyeswill move from side-to-side with the object.

The plate 16 is somewhat narrower than the space between the vertical abutment portions I02 of the animals head in the horizontal pathot travel of the plate so that when the object is moved from side-to-side, within a limited range, the eyeswill move without causing any corre sponding'movement of the head. However, when the object-is moved beyond" this range, one-or the other sides of the plate will strike thecora responding abutment portion, and thereafter,- when the object is moved-in the same direction the-head will move with it.

lt also will be appreciated that by rotating the object 96 through a small circle, the animal's eyes may be caused to roll.

The center "of gravity of the head is forward of the opening 36 in the ear 34 so that when the head is at rest, the snout is at its lowermost position with reference to the horizontal axis of "rotation passing-through 'said opening; If the object is raised beyond the level required to open the eyes, the upper edge of the plate 40 will stroke the rearwardly extending interior surface I04 of the head in back of the flat vertical portion of the head around the eye openings. Thereafter, as the object 96 is moved further upwardly the head will rock in a clockwise direction (as viewed in Fig. 2) through a limited arc determined by the front-to-back dimension of the elongated opening 38.

When the other end of the object is presented to the head, the magnet will be repelled'thereby so that when the object is held to the snout and the head is in its foremost position, it will retreat into the dog house as the object is advanced. Moreover, the head will turn to the side in order to move away from the vicinity of the object. This action may be taken advantage of to increase the amusement afforded by the toy, for, if one purporting to be the owner of the toy who has shown an interested bystander how the head apparently follows the bone hands the bone to a bystander, the bystander automatically will grasp the bone in a reverse position and, although he manipulates the bone in an apparently similar manner, exactly the opposite result will be obtained.

It should be observed that this latter feature of the toy is due to the fact that the head magseveral objects of my invention and is well adapted to meet the conditions of practical use.

As various possible embodiments might be made of the above invention, and as various changes might be made in the embodiments above set forth, it is to be understood that all matter herein described or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

, Having thus described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent:

1. A toy comprising a hollow head of a nonmagnetic material with an eye opening, a spindle, a bearing fixed to said head and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof, an eye member disposed within said head, said eye member having a representation of an eye and being located behind the eye opening, a second bearing fixed to said eye member and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof whereby said head and eye'member are independently rotatable about the longitudinal axis of said spindle, abutment members in the head and adapted to be contacted by said eye member as it turns about said spindle, said abutment members being spaced apart farther than the corresponding dimension of the eye member whereby said eye member may experience a limited movement with respect to the head before said abutment members are contacted thereby and, thereafter, the head will move with the eye member as the eye member continues to move in the same direction, a magnet within said head and connected to and movable with said eye member, said magnet having at least one pole thereof in proximity to the inner surface of said head, and an exterior object including a magnet adapted to be approached to said head and in cooperation with the magnet in said head to cause movement of said eye member independently of or with said head. 7

2. A toy comprising a hollow head of a nonmagnetic material with an eye opening, a spindle, a bearing fixed, to said head and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof, an eye member disposed within said head, said eye member having a representation of an eye and being located behind the eye opening, a second bearing fixed to said eye member and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof whereby said head and eye member are independently rotatable about the longitudinal axis of said spindle, a magnet within said head and connected to and movable with said eye member, said magnet having at least one pole thereof in proximity to the inner surface of said head, and an exterior object including a magnet adapted to be approached to said head.

3. A toy comprising a hollow head of a nonmagnetic material with an eye opening, a spindle which is forwardly inclined with respect to a Vertical plan passing from one side to the other of the head, a bearing fixed to said head and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof, an eye member disposed Within said head, said eye member having a representation of an eye and being located behind the eye opening, a second bearing fixed to said eye member and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof whereby said head and eye member are independently rotatable about the head and axis of said spindle, a magnet Within said head and connected to and movable with said eye member, said magnet having at least one pole thereof in proximity to the inner surface of said head, and an exterior object including a magnet adapted to be approached to said head.

4. A toy comprising a hollow head of a nonmagnetic material with an eye opening, a spindle which is forwardly inclined with respect to a vertical plane passing from one side to the other of the head, a bearing fixed to said head and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof, an eye member disposed Within said head, said eye member having a representation of an eye and being located behind the eye opening, a second bearing fixed to said eye member and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof whereby said head and eye member are independently rotatable about the head and axis of said spindle, a magnet within said head and connected to and movable with said eye member, said magnet having its polar axis extending in a front-to-back direction with respect to the head and having a pole thereof in proximity to the inner surface of said head, and an exterior object including a magnet adapted to be approached to said head.

5. A toy comprising a hollow head of a nonmagnetic material with an eye opening, a spindle, a base, means mounting said spindle on said base for movement along a predetermined path relative thereto, an enclosure on said base having an opening through which said path extends whereby said head is movable through said opening upon movement of said spindle relative to said base, a bearing fixed to said head and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof, an eye member disposed within said head, said eye member having a representation of an eye and being located behind the eye opening, a second bearing fixed to said eye member and rotatable on said spindle along the longitudinal axis thereof whereby said head and eye member are independently rotatable about the longitudinal axis of said spindle, a magnet within said 6. A toy comprising a hollow head of a nonmagnetic material with an eye opening, .a spindle, abearingfixed to said head and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof, an eye member disposedwithin said-head,-said eye "member having a representation of an eye and being located behind-theeye opening, a second bearing fixed to said eye member and rotatable i on said spindleabout the longitudinal axis thereofwhereby said head andeyemember are independentlyrotatable about 'thelongitudinal axis of said spindle, said second bearing being-oversized whereby said eye member additionally is limitedly rotatable about an axis perpendicular to the longitudinal axis-pf saidspindle, a magnet wi thin;said head and connected to and movable with said eye-member, saidmagnet having at leastone pole thereof in proximityto the inner surface-of said head, and an'exterior object-in- -cluding a magnet adapted tobe approached to saidhead.

7. A toy-comprisinga hollow head of a nonmagnetio material with an eye opening, a spindle,

iabearing fixed to said head and rotatable on .saidspindle about the longitudinal axis thereof, an eye member disposed within said head, said eye member having a representation of aneye and being located behind the eye opening,a secva b n fi t a d e eymembe an tatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof whereby said head and eye member fare independently rotatable about the longitudinal axis of saidspindle, said secondbearing being oversized whereby said eye member additionally is limitedly rotatable about an axis perpehdicrilarto the longitudinal axisof said spindlerabutment members inthe head and adapted to be contacted by 'saideye member as it turns about saidIspindla-said abutment members being spaced'fapart farther than the corresponddimensionof the eye member whereby said eye member may experience a limited movement with respect-to the head before said abut'ment members are contacted thereby and; thereafter, the head will move with the eye member as the eye'member continues to move in the same direction, a magnet within said head and connected to and movable with said eye member, said magnet having at least one polethereof in proximity to the inner surface of said'head, and an'ex terior object including a mag-net adapted'to be approached to said headand in cooperation with the magnet in said head to cause movement of saideye member independently of or with said head.

8. A toy comprising a hollow head of a nonmagnetic material'with an eye opening, a spindle "which is forwardly inclined with respect to a vertical plane passing from one side to the other ofthe head, a bearing fixed to said head and rz itatable' on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof, said bearing being oversized whereand eye emb ar ind endent v o atab about the longitudinal axis of--said spindlagsaid second bearing being oversized whereby said "it turns about said spindle, said abutment members being spaced apart-farther than the corresponding dimension of the eye member whereby said eye member may experience a limited movement with respect to the head before said abutment members are contacted thereby and, thereafter, the head will move with-the eye member as the eye member continues to move in the same directionga-magnet within said head and connectedtogand movable with said eye member,

said magnet-havingat least one pole thereof in proximity to the inner surface of said head, and

an exterior object including a magnet adapted to be approached to said head and in cooperation with the magnet in said head to c ause movement of said eye member independently of or withsaid head. I

9. A toy comprising a hollow head of a nonmagnetic material with an eye opening, a spindle which is forwardly inclined'with respect to a vertical plane passing from one side to theother of the head, a bearing fixed to said head and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof, said bearing being oversized whereby said head additionally is limitedly rotatable about an axisperpendicular to the longitudinal axis of said spindle, an eye member disposed within said head, said eye member having a representation of an eyeand being located behind the eye opening, a second bearing fixed to said eye member and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof whereby said head and eye member are independently rotatable about the longitudinal axis of said spindle, said second bearing being oversized whereby said head addition-ally is limitedly rotatable aboutan axis perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of said spindle, a magnet within said head and connected to and movable with said eye member, said magnet having at least one pole thereof in proximity to the inner surface of said head,

and an exterior object including a magnet adaptporting'element a spindle secured to said .ele-

ment, a bearing fixed to said head and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof; an eye member disposed within said head, said eye member having a representation of an eye and being located behind the eye opening, a second bearing fixed to said eye member androt-atable on said spindle about the lo-ngitudinal axis thereof whereby said head and eye member are independently rotatable about the longitudinal axis of said spindle, said second hearing being oversized whereby said head is additionally rotatable about anaxis perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of said spindle, abutment members carried by the head andadapted to be contacted by said eye member as it turns about said spindie, said abutment members being spaced apart farther than the corresponding dimension of the eye member whereby said eye member may experience a limited movement with respect to the acfaooe head before said abutment members are contacted thereby and, thereafter, the head will move with the eye member as the eye member continues to move in the same direction, a magnet within said head and connected to and movable with said eye member, said magnet having at least one pole thereof in proximity to the inner surface of said head, and an exterior object including a magnet adapted to be approached to said head and in cooperation with the magnet in said head to cause movement of said eye member independently of or with said head.

11. A toy comprising a hollow head of a nonmagnetic material with a pair of eye openings, said toy having a forehead whose interior surface is substantially fiat, a spindle which is forwardly inclined with respect to a vertical plane passing from one side to the other of the head, a bearing fixed to said head and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof, a flat plate having a pair of eyes represented thereon in substantially the same spaced relationship as said eye openings, said plate bein located immediately in back of said forehead and being parallel thereto, a lever, a second bearing fixed to said lever and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof whereby said lever and eye member are independently rotatable about the longitudinal axis of said spindle, said second bearing being oversized whereby the lever additionally is limitedly movable about an axis perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the spindle, a swivel pivotedly connecting said plate to said lever whereby the eyes are guided for up and down and sideways movement relative to the eye openings while remaim ing substantially parallel to the interior surface of the forehead of the toy, a magnet within said head and carried by said lever, said magnet having only a single pole extending forwardly, said pole being in proximity to the inner surface of the head, and an exterior object including a magnet adapted to have a single pole thereof approached to said head.

12. A toy comprising a hollow head of a nonmagnetic material with a pair of eye openings, said toy having a forehead whose interior surface is substantially flat, a spindle which is forwardly inclined with respect to a vertical plane passing from one side to the other of the head, a bearing fixed to said head and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof, a fiat plate having a pair of eyes represented thereon in substantially the same spaced relationship as said eye openings, said plate being located immediately in back of said forehead and being parallel thereto, a lever, a second bearing fixed to said lever and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof whereby said lever and eye member are independently rotatable about the longitudinal axis of said spindle, said second bearing being oversized whereby the lever additionally is limitedly movable about an axis perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the spindle, a swivel pivotedly connecting said plate to said lever whereby the eyes are guided for up and down and sideways movement relative to the eye openings while remaining substantially parallel to the interior surface of the forehead of the toy, a magnet within said head and carried by said lever, said magnet having only a single pole extending forwardly, said pole being in proximity to the inner surface of the head, a counterweight mounted on said lever to counterbalance the weight of the magnet, and an exterior object including a magnet adapted to have a single pole thereof approached to said head.

13. A toy comprising a hollow head of a nonmagnetic material with a pair of eye openings, said toy having a forehead whose interior surface is substantially flat, 'a spindle which is forwardly inclined with respect to a vertical plane passing from one side to the other of the head, a bearing fixed to said head and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof, a flat plate having a pair of eyes represented thereon in substantially the same spaced relationship as said eye openings, said plate being located immediately in back of said forehead and being parallel thereto, a lever, a second bearing fixed to said lever and rotatable on said spindle about the longitudinal axis thereof whereby said lever and eye member are independently rotatable about the longitudinal axis of said spindle, said second bearing being oversized whereby the lever additionally is limitedly movable about an axis perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the spindle, a swivel pivotedly connecting said plate to said lever whereby the eyes are guided for up and down and sideways movement relative to the eye openings while remainin substantially parallel to the interior surface of the forehead of the toy, abutment members within said head adapted to be contacted by the plate as it is moved from side to side, said abutment 5 members being spaced apart farther than the corresponding dimension of the plate whereby said plate may experience a limited movement with respect to the head before said abutment members are contacted thereby and thereafter the head will move with the plate as the plate continues to move in the same direction, a magnet within said head and carried by said lever, said magnet having only a single pole extending forwardly, said pole being in proximity to the inner surface of the head, a counterweight mounted on said lever to counterbalance the weight of the magnet, and an exterior object including a magnet adapted to have a single pole thereof approached to said head.

FRANK I. SAMET.

REFERENCES CETED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PA I E NTS Number Name Date 796,419 Halbig Aug. 8, 1905 847,715 Wood Mar. 19, 1907 1,424,982 Budin Aug. 8, 1922 1,595,801 McDonald Aug. 10, 1926 2,036,076 Philippi Mar. 31, 1936 2,107,672 Lang Feb. 8, 1938 2,277,672 Stone Mar. 31, 1942 2,427,210 Harding Sept. 9, 1947 2,427,442 Campbell Sept. 16, 1947 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 9,811 Great Britain 1894

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3383793 *Jul 5, 1966May 21, 1968Luxe Topper Corp DeDoll's eye provided with magnetic means
US3394494 *Feb 1, 1967Jul 30, 1968Egon GorskyDoll head support mechanism
US7040951 *Jan 5, 2004May 9, 2006Hornsby James RAmusement device
US7524231 *Oct 31, 2006Apr 28, 2009Mattel, Inc.Doll and face-licking puppy combination
US20130292428 *Aug 2, 2011Nov 7, 2013Kee Square S.R.L.Intelligent mannequin
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/132
International ClassificationA63H13/02, A63H13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H13/02
European ClassificationA63H13/02