Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2618400 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 18, 1952
Filing dateNov 4, 1948
Priority dateNov 4, 1948
Publication numberUS 2618400 A, US 2618400A, US-A-2618400, US2618400 A, US2618400A
InventorsImhof Herman A
Original AssigneeUnited Shoe Machinery Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of and machine for inserting blind fastenings
US 2618400 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. A. IMHOF Nov. 18, 1952 METHOD OF' AND MACHINE FOR INSERTING BLIND FASTENINGS 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 4, 1948 In vemoi? Herman/1.1771502 v Nov. 18, 1952 H. A. IMHOF METHOD OF AND MACHINE FOR INSERTING BLIND FASTENINGS 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 4, 1948 EERE Invenio f/rmafiA-[fnhof H. A. IMHOF Nov. 18, 1952 METHOD OF AND MACHINE FOR INSERTING BLIND FASTENINGS 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Nov. 4, 1948 Invenior Nov. 18, 1952 H. A. IMHOF 2,618,400

METHOD OF AND MACHINE FOR INSERTING BLIND FASTENINGS 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Nov. 4, 1948 I Inuen for Her'manA- Jmhof H. A. IMHOF Nov. 18, 1952 METHOD OF AND MACHINE FOR INSERTING BLIND FASTENINGS 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Nov. 4, 1948 lnvem'or Hrmafi Afmho/ Patented Nov. l8, 1952 UNITED STATES TNT OFFICE;

Herman A. Imhof, Beverly, Mass, assignor. to U ited sho Mach n or ora on F emins a N- J a corporation o New Jer er Application, November 4, 1948,;SerialNo. 58,233

11 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in methods of and machines for inserting fastenings into work parts or stock, either for the purpose of securing together such work parts or for the attachment of articles such as ornaments to work parts or stock, or both, the fastenings being so inserted that they do not penetrate through the entire thickness of the combined parts or the stock, but become anchored within the substance of the combined work parts or the stock. Fas-v tenings ofthat type are frequently referred to in the trade as blind-fastenings.

It is a purpose of the invention to improve uponand to simplify .the insertion of blind fastenings, generally speaking, while resorting to no, or a minimum of,-extraneous orauxiliary defleeting-elements.

In accordance with one ofthe principal features of the invention the work itself into which the blind fastening is to be inserted is relied upon as the primary, if not the exclusive, deflecting factor, and to this end an interior portion of the work, at the location where the fastening is to be inserted, is compacted prior to the insertion of the fastening, whereupon the fastening is so inserted that its leading end portion becomes defiected by the compacted portion of the work and thus is caused to penetrate into. and become anchored within an adjacent noncompacted portion of the work without penetratin the entire thickness of the work. The features of the invention may be advantageously employed to fasten materials or objects to a relatively thick piece of leather or of any other material which, like leather, is adapted to become. densely compacted throughout portions which are subjected to a heavy impact pressure, and adapted to remain compacted after the pressure has been removed. In addition to leather, examples of two suitable materials possessing requisite physical characteristics are vulcanized fiber and. a leather substitute sold under the tradename of Darex, extensively used as an insole material in shoemaking.

In its method aspect, the invention, therefore, is characterized generically. by the two important steps of compacting an. interior portion of the combined work-parts or stock and then deflecting a fastening progressively rearwardlyv from its leadin end portion by driving the fastening against only the compacted. portion of the work parts or stock so it becomes anchored within the substance-of .thecombined work partsor stock.

While it is possible that, as actual tests have shown, the above-definedmethodsteps may be practiced: manually withoutv the use of any specific. mechanism. or machine, the method by. preference. may :be practiced by the use of. novel mechanismiembody'ing. additional. novel. features of the invention. Since theinvention is capable of embodiment in several forms, two. preferred embodiments of. the invention. are herein. illustrated, one. bein an. .eyeleting. machine, and; the other a stapling machine, both machines having in common the provision of'meansfor compacting-an. interior portion .ofthe work parts or stock presented to. the machine in combination with means for so inserting a fastening, be. it an eye.- .let-or a. staple, into the stock that theleadingend portion. of. the. fastening becomesdeflected by the compacted portion of thesto'ck intdan. adjacent noncompacted. portion. of the. stock without penetrating the. entire thickness of the stock,'thus anchoring the. fastening well within the substance of. thestock.

Theseand. other features of the invention will now. be. described. in, detail. in. connection with the accompanying drawings and, will. be pointedont in the. appended claims.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a, view in right-hand side. elevation of an eyeleting machine. in which the invention is shown as. embodied;

Fig. 2 is a plan view. of the machineillustrated in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a frontelevationof-themachineillus- Grated. in Fig. 1;

Rig. 4 is a plan view. ofthetoolsupporting. and controllin mechanism of themachineillustrated in Fig.1;;-

Fig. 5. is a lett-handside elevation, in section, of the mechanism illustrated: in Fig. 4;

Fig. 6: is a front elevation of the. mechanism illustratedin Fig. 4

Fig. 7 is a detailview, in section, ofaa punching tool illustrating the. operationv of the. tool upon the work parts presented to the machine;

Fig. 8, is .a detail View of an eyelet inserting and settin tool: illustrating. theoperation of the tool upon the portion of the. work'parts prepared by the punchin tool illustrated. in Fig. 7.;

Fig. 9, is a view in front. elevation of a1 stapling machine constituting another. embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 10.15 a vie. in left-hand side elevation of the essential parts-of the machine illustrated in Fig. 9, the parts being. shown in section; I

Fig. '11 is a view. in left-hand side elevation of the machineshown in Fig. 9; i

I'Tigs.v 1:2. and 13 illustrate the progressive actions of the staple presenting and staple inserting tools of the machine shown in Fig. 9;

Fig. 14 is a detail view, in section, of a modified punching tool illustrating the operation of the punch upon work parts to be fastened by a fiber peg; and

Fig. 15 is a detail view, in section, of a fiber peg inserting and setting tool illustrating the operation of the tool upon a peg driven against the portion of the work parts prepared by the tool illustrated in Fig. 14.

It has been indicated that since the invention is capable of embodiment in several tangible forms, two preferred embodiments of the mechanical features of the invention are shown in the drawings, namely an eyeleting machine illus-- trated in Figs. 1 to 8, and a stapling machine illustrated in Figs. 9 to 13. It also has been stated that both machines have in common the generic features of first compacting an interior portion of the work parts or stock presented to them and then so inserting a fastening into the work parts or the stock that the leading end portion of the fastening becomes deflected by the compacted portion of the stock and enters into an adjacent noncompacted portion of the stock without penetrating th entire thickness of the stock.

Referring first to the eyeleting machine of Figs. 1 to 8, it will be noted that the machine comprises a frame l provided with an overhang l2. The illustrated work parts are superimposed layers of material a, b, 0 (Figs. 7 and 8) which are to be secured together by an eyelet e in the fashion indicated in Fig. 8. As heretofore related, the material, comprising the layer a and within which the fastening is to be deflected and anchored, must be first compressible to produce densely compacted interior portions which will then maintain their compacted state after the removal of the compressing force, so that the material in these portions may be employed as a deflecting medium for anchoring the fastening within the stock. In the case of the eyelet type fastening, illustrated in Figs. 7 and 8, the layer a should also be of suflicient thickness to permit the leading end portion of the fastening to be firmly embedded therein without penetrating through the entire thickness of the stock. As an illustrative example, let it be supposed that an impervious outer layer 0 of clear plastic is to be used as an outer covering for a sheet b of decorative paper, and it is desired to apply these upon a piece of leather backing a, this leather.

stock having a thickness of about an eighth of an inch. The eyelet 6 may be suitably formed from a ductile metal such as brass, copper or aluminum, the wall thickness of the skirt or lower leading edge portion of this eyelet being thin enough to become upset when driven against a compacted portion of leather. The requisite length for the skirt portion would depend upon the aggregate thicknesses of the layers b and c, and the depth, beneath the surface of layer a, to which the compacted portion has been carried by the punching operation, for the skirt must penetrate this distanc before it begins to be upset by the compacted portions during its driving. The foregoing is not to be construed in any way as limiting the practice of the invention to the anchoring of metallic fastenings into leather stock, for it is within the contemplation of this invention to vary the fastening material to best suit the characteristics of the stock in which the fastening is to be upset. For instance a heavily calendered backing of vulcanized fiber might require the use of steel eyelets, whereas a plastic eyelet might sufiice for forming a fastening to be anchored into a backing of soft wood. The work parts a, b, c are placed upon a work table I 4 mounted in the machine frame [0, as will be described, and provided with a gage 16 which determines the operative position of the work parts upon the work table M.

The table id is in the shape of a round disk and is vertically adjustable in the machine, as will be presently described. Integral with the table it is a downwardly extending stem [8 (Fig. 1) which engages a vertical bore 2i! provided in a portion of the machine frame ID. The stem l8 has a threaded lower end 22 in threaded engagement with which is a hand nut 25 contained in a horizontal slot 25 provided in the frame portion I fl. The hand nut 24 thus is held against vertical movement but is capable of rotation about the central axis of the stem 58. A horizontal guiding screw 28 is threaded through a portion of the machine frame Ii] and extends into a groove or keyway provided in the front portion of the stem it so as to prevent rotation of the stem 5 and of the table !4 but to permit vertical adjustment of the table H! on rotation of the hand nut 24. The hand nut 24 may be held in adjusted position by a manually operated plunger 3| removably held in the machine frame It] and extending into one of a series of holes provided in the peripheral portion of the hand nut 24.

For the purpose of adjusting the edge gage It horizontally and with relation to the table [4 there is provided a groove 32 (Fig. 3) in the table hi, the groove extending in the longitudinal direction of the machine (forward and rearward) and receiving a guide piece 3 5 integral with the bottom portion of the edge gage it. Thus the edge gage may be adjusted along the groove 32.

t is held in adjusted position by a clamping screw 36 (Fig. 1) which extends through a slot 38 (Figs. 1 and 2) provided in the edge gage I6, and is threaded into the table I4.

The two work engaging or operating instruinentalities or tools of themachine (illustrated in Figs. 1 to 8) are a punch Qi) and an eyelet inserting and setting tool 42. As illustrated in Fig. 6, the punch 43 is held in a clamping collar 44 which is part of a rotary carrier 36 secured on a shaft 58 rotatably mounted in the lower portion of a vertically reciprocating plunger 56. The rotary carrier at is partly received in a recess 52 (Fig. 5) provided in the lower portion of the plunger 58. The setting tool 42 is held in a clamping collar 54 corresponding to the collar "54 and also a part of the rotary carrier 46, the tool 32 extending at right angles to the punch 40. In the position of the parts illustrated in Fig. 6 the punch 45) is located in its effective position with relation to the reciprocating plunger so that on downward movement of the plunger 56 the punch M) will become operative to punch a hole into the work supported on the table M, as will be described. Upward movement, thereafter, of the plunger 5%! withdraws the punch 40 from the work and on rotation of the shaft 48 and the carrier 46 in a counterclockwise direction (as viewed in Fig. 6) the punch 46 will be moved out of its efiective position with relation to the plunger 5t and the setting tool 42, to which in the meantime an eyelet has been presented in a manner well-known in the art, will be moved into its effective position with relation to the plunger 50. Downward movement of the plunger 50 then l s t nv n sr i'on nsr or edib t aw le ns rtin nd set n 1 01- on h Work parts, more specifically, the tool '42 ;fwillinsert the eyelet previously presented to, it into the hole provided in the work by the punch 40- and upset the eyelet therein. To rotate" the shaft 48' so: as .to move thev punch fl'fl" and. the tool 42' alterna'tely into and out of their efi ective positions with relation to the plunger 50, there is secured upon a forwardly extending portion ofthe'shaft 43 a hand wheel 56'. To hold the shaft #8 in place, there is mountedion ajrearwardly extendin portion thereof a collar 5B which is pinned to. th shaft 48 and abuts th rear wan qr; the we t o he n er 5 s b s s in Fig. 5.

To look or hold either the punch or the tool '42 in their respective 'ef fective positionsjwith relation to the plungerfdll, there provided a spring lock mechanism comprising a small plunger 68 vertically movable in the recess 52 and in an upper reduced extension 62' thereof. The plunger 60 has a head '6] on its lower "extrem'ity upon which. is seated the lower "end of a spr pper d f. hich e es a shoulder 'portion'o'f. the recess 52. "Iihespringt i thus tends'to 'defpressthe .plungerffiil with the head portion of the plunger en aging one off-two 'flat faces disposed atright angles to each other on the rotary carrier at. Rotation ofthecarrier 46 to. move one or-the other of the two to'ols 40,42

effective position results 'in a v temporary. upward. displacement of the plunger GOJagainstthe pressure of "the s ring 64. whereupon, 'after'the tool has arrived in it's'efiectiv'e position, the head portion "of the plunger (it) engages the correspondingfiat face on the 'carri'er4IB under thepressur of the spring'iifll'to holdth'e't'ool,

The abovesmentioned "tool operating plunger '51] is mounted for verticalreciprocation in the 'inachine-fand is operated in a manner which. will now be described. Formed, onjth'e upper extremity of 'theplunger '50 'is a 'head 'BBJG'igs. '1, 3, 5 and. '6). 'whichis g'uidedfor vertical. reciprocating movements ina bore 6 8 provided thefforwar'd portion of'the overhang l-2. Beneath the head 66i there is -mounted'infthe bore '68. and surrounding tlie.plung-er5'0 -a$spring 1.0, the lower end of which isseat ed. upon'the bottom of. the boref68. The spring 10 thus tends .to 'elevatetheheadffifi and the plunger 50; The upper endportion of the 5 hea dfG 6 is rounded and the frontlace. ofthe h'ead KSis provided with a groove or keyway 12 which is engaged byascrew'M threa'ded 'into. the

front portion of'the overhang 1 2, this toprevent the head 66 and plunger 50 from turning about their vertical centralaxis during their reciprocatory motions. The roundedupper end portion of the headfit v isengaged-by an operating lever 1 6. (Fig. 1) pivotally secured: at-itsffront endto a lug provided on the. overhang l2- and pivotally ;;co nnected at its rear end to a treadle rod 18.

The lower end of the treadle rod "1 8is pivotally connected to a treadle (-not'shown) which, in a manner well-known in theart, is normally so held by a treadle spring (not-shown) 'that the treadlev rod 78; is maintained in its uppermostposition. Depression; of the treadle results in a downward motion of the rod 18, thereby swinging. down the lever 16. and depressing the. head 66'. and plunger-"50 against the pressure of, the

"springlflftofo'perate either one ofthe-toolslilf42.

"Alder e "operation tith r pectiveoo Ttr ad ef s r le sed to. c usepw rd movem ntof thetrea'dle 'rod' 18 and' upward'swinging "movemer t of the operatinglever 16, the compressed spring 10' at; the same time moving the head 66 and plunger- 5 0- upwardly. The-lowenend ofthe path of-downward swinging movement of" theopcrating lever IQ-and accordingly the lowenend of the operative-stroke of eitherthe punch Ml or the setting tool- 42; are adjustably determined by a stop screw 89 which is: threaded into the overhang I2 and with which the operating lever-l6 contacts/on downward-swingingfmotion.

Referring now more in detail to theconstruction and operatic-noithe punch 40 and thesetting tool 4/2, it will be noted in Fig; 7 thatthe punch 4-0 has a reduced lowerportionBZ which is hollow-and provided with a cutting edge at its lowerextremity.- Movablein the "hollowportion 8-2 is a plunger 84- which servesto-expet the 'cutting waste from; within the portion -82-'on; elevation of the tool so afterthe completion of a punching stroke. The plunger 84 is provided Witha collar -88- which is guided for vertical reciprocation: in a bore 88 of the main portion of the punch 46, there-being mounteda spring Slllon the collar "36, the upperend-of-the spring abuttinga shoulder of the "bore 83-. The spring as thus tends to depress the plunger 84 within the punch 40 so that the lower endof the plunger 84 is located close to the lower extremity of the punch 4 0 in the normal inoperative posit-ion thereof. After location of the punch 4-0" in its elfective relation to the plunger 50 and downward movement of the plunger tithe lower portion '82 of-the punch is caused to punch a hole through the layers 0 and b of the combined work parts and into the layer a which may be considered the body portion of the stock. It is to be understood that while the body portion of the stock a must' possess certain characteristics whichpermit it to be compressed to form a suitable deflecting medium, those materials forming the layers 1) or c which are to be completelypunched through may have an almost infinite diversity of physical properties or characteristics. The cutting waste'produced by punching through the layers c and b enters the lower portion -8 2-of' the punch 40 (as illustrated in Fig. 7) forcing the plunger 84 upward against the pressure of the spring 90. Upon withdrawal of the ,punch 40 from the work, the spring "9D is free to expand, forcing the plungerB-A downward in the'punch and expelling the waste material.

As already stated, the punch enters into the layer a or body portion of thework Without penetrating its iullthicknessit'bein'g understood that the force of the punch 'is considerable so that when the .punchihas reached its final operative position (illustrated in Fig. 7) the interior portion of the layer'a'between thelower end of the punch and the lowersurface of the layer a will have become considerably compacted, particularly along the slanting face 11, indicatedin'Figs. '7 and 8.

The setting tool "42 is; provided inthe customary manner with a pilot '92 which extends fromthe lower portion of the tool 4 2- and is movable with relation thereto. The upper endof the pilot 92 is provided with a collar or head 94 vertically movable ina bore '95 proyided in the tool '42 and biased by a spring -9 B,the upper end of which contacts-the upperend portion of the bore96. The spring 98-thus tends to push the pilot92 'outwardlywith relation to the tool'42yso, that in normal inoperative position 'of'theitool' 42 an eyelet e may be placed over theprotruding pilot 92 "and" may be -frictionally' held thereon.

After the completion of the operative stroke of the punch 40 the plunger 50 is again elevated whereupon the hand wheel 56 is rotated to rotate both tools 40 and 42 in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 6, thereby moving the punch 49 out of its effective position with relation to the plunger 50 and moving the setting tool 42 into its effective position. The plunger 50 again is depressed by the manipulation of the treadle with the result that the eyelet e held on the tool 42 .is inserted into the hole previously made in the work by the punch 40 (see Fig. 8). Continued operation of the setting tool 42 results in a displacement of the pilot 92 into the interior of the tool 42, and in a driving of the eyelet e along the previously punched hole in the work with the result that the lower or leading end portion of the eyelet e is caused to impinge upon the compacted slanting face d and to become laterally deflected thereon into an adjacent nonconfpacted portion of the layer a, as illustrated in the right-hand side of Fig. 8. Thus, the eyelet e is deflected progressively rearwardly from its leading end by driving the eyelet against only the compacted face d. It will be seen, therefore, that the three layers a b and c are firmly secured together by the driven and upset eyelet e and that the eyelet e is firmly anchored within the body portion of the work without penetrating through the entire thickness of the work. As already stated, the eyelet may be inserted also in such a fashion that it not only secures the three layers a, b and together but attaches thereto an article such as an ornament. The setting tool 42 having completed its operative stroke, the punch 50 is raised to withdraw the tool 42 from the work. Rotation of the hand wheel 58 in a clockwise direction (as seen in Fig. 6) thereupon results in the setting tool 42 again being moved out of its efiective position with relation to the plunger 58 and simultaneously in the punch 45 being moved into its eifective position (shown in Fig. 6) in readiness for the next descent of the plunger 55 to punch a hole into the work adjacent to the previously made hole, the work having, in the meantime, been manually fed across the table 14.

The stapling machine, shown in Figs. 9 to 13, illustrates a further embodiment of the invention, as already pointed out. The stapling machine has a frame IID (Figs. 9 to 11) provided with three vertically spaced and forwardly extending arms or brackets H2, H4 and H8. The lower bracket II2 carries a work table IIB provided with a work gage I 28. The gage is mount ed for horizontal adjustment with relation to the table H8 and to this end is provided with a slot I22 (Fig. through which extends a clamping screw I24 threaded into the table II 8 and adapted to hold the edge gage I2!) in its position of adjustment similar to the gage arrangement of the eyeleting machine of Figs. 1 to 8. The work parts to be operated upon comprise two superimposed layers a, b which are to be secured together by a staple 8 (Figs. 12 and 13). As in the case of the eyelet inserted by the previouslydescribed eyeleting machine, the staple when being driven into the work parts becomes anchored within these parts without penetrating their entire thickness in that during the driving of the staple, the staple legs are laterally deflected by interior compressed portions 0 (Figs. 12 and 13) of the layer a which constitutes the body portion of the work.

For a purpose to be described, the work table I I8 and the gage I233 which locates the work parts a, b in operative position on the work table II8 are mounted for vertical reciprocation in the frame bracket I I2. To this end the table I I8 has extending downwardly from it an integral stem I26 which is vertically movable in a bore I28 provided in the bracket H2. A guide screw I) threaded into the bracket II2 extends into a vertical groove or keyway I32 provided in the front portion of the stem I28, thus preventing rotation of the stem I2% and the table H8 during vertical reciprocation thereof. The lower end of the stern I26 is pivotally connected to the front end of a two-armed lever I34 rotatably mounted in the machine frame IIE] midway between its ends and also pivotally connected at its rear end to a treadle rod I35 (Fig. 11). The treadle rod I35 is pivotally connected at its lower end to a treadle (not shown) which is springbiased to hold the treadle rod I35 elevated and which, upon depression, lowers the treadle rod I35 to impart to the lever I34 a swinging movement in a counterclockwise direction (as viewed in Fig. 11) to elevate the stem I26 and table i I3.

The illustrated stapling machine also is provided with two main work contacting or operating instrumentalities or tools, namely a punch I36 and a driver I323. The punch I36 is normally held fixed in the frame bracket H4 and is provided with two prongs (as shown in Figs. 9 and 12). The two prongs of the punch I36 are the lower extremities of a block I40 (Figs. 9 to 11) which is mounted in a bore I42 provided in the frame bracket I E4. The block I40 has a threaded upper extension I44 by means of which the block may be adjusted heightwise of the machine. To prevent rotary motion of the block during heightwise adjustment, a guide screw I45 threaded into the bracket H4 engages a vertical groove or keyway I48 (Fig. 10) provided in the front portion of the block I49. The upper portion of the bore I42 provided in the bracket H4 is of enlarged diameter and is tapped to receive a hollow hand screw I56. The hand screw I50 has an inwardly projecting radial shoulder portion I52 (Fig. 10) which at its bottom face engages a shoulder on the block I40 and at its top face a nut I54 in threaded engagement with the upper extension I44 of the block I 48!. The nut I54 is held in position by a check nut I56 also in threaded engagement with the upper extension I44 of the block I48. To hold the hand screw I 50 in its position of adjustment and accordingly to hold the entire assembly supported by it, primarily the block I40 and the punch I36, in its heightwise adjusted position, a check nut I58 is in threaded engagement with the hand screw I59 and is tightened against the top face of the bracket II4. Thus block I49 and punch I36 are held normally fixed in the machine frame.

The above-mentioned driver I38 is mounted for vertical reciprocation between the two prongs of the punch I35 (as shown best in Figs. 9, 12 and 13). The driver extends upward from the prongs I 38 through the bore I42, as well as a bore I60 provided in the block I46 and its upper extension I44, through the hand screw I 50 into a chuck IE2. The chuck I82 is provided on the threaded lower extension I64 of a vertically reciprocating slide I65. The slide I66 is guided in bushings I68, I'Hi mounted in a, bore provided in the upper frame bracket H6. A guide screw I72 threaded into the bracket H6 extends into a vertical keyway I14 provided in the front portion of the slide I66 to prevent rotation of the a aeo l the driver I38 in the chuck lliz'orarelea'setherefrom depending upon thedirection of rotation of he h ew "it. 'T e ed hen' h lew he-e ie ef the-threw i e, etthlhh lt h is ea ed e h' de ehh ee ie hee. te h h'efihri portion of the hand screw I50 and which is held in adjusted position upon the screw I13 by a check nut I82.

. T jhe hre ete th e 'idel't e th t to hpart reoiprocatory motion to the driver I33, the upper extremityof the slide lfi fiispivotally iconh e, to t e. i eht ehsl t eth. twe ehh th ihele er t ethlly ee t' d 6. tejthe heeh f e e r el.- th hi he et hltfi he pive e eehh ee the e. t ee le r e I3 em in F T e eee tee is eivete lr eehhe' l d 1th ewe ehd t e. hr e-titted 'treee et wn). eehr eeieh twh th. e hee vee o h re h e hh ih m vement, o he lever I84 in a clockwise direction (as viewed in Fig. 11) with the result that a downward driving motion is imparted to the driver I 38 to the extent permitted by the selected spacing between the stop nut I80 and hand screw I50. I H

T iheht eg he het 1h he .hehhe men r t e peeitieh etthe mee he he -t t viewed in Fig. 9 the lower end of the driver I38 is located a considerable distance above the lower end of the two prongs of the punch I35 so that a staple s, the legs of which have laterally deflected end portions, may be placed upon the prongs of the punch I36 with the bar of the staple resting against the lower extremity of the driver I38. By now depressing the treadle connected with the treadle rod I35, upward movement is imparted to the work table '8 and the work parts a', b supported thereon until the stationary punch I36 has penetrated entirely through the layer 1) and has partly penetrated through the body portion a of the work, as illustrated in Fig. 1-2. In doing so, the previously 0 mentioned interior portions 0 of the layer a have become compacted and fat the sarnetirne the staple s has been partially and bodily inserted or pushed into the work. While maintaining the work table H8 in its elevated position, e. g by maintaining the corresponding treadle depressed, and thus maintaining the relative positions of the punch and the work parts a and b', the driver I38 is caused to descend by the depression of the treadle connected to the treadle rod I88 with the result that the driver I 38 drives the parie li erted sta le heme t he posit n he cated in Fig. 13. In driving the partially inserted staple s home, the staple legs are progressively deflected rearwardly from their leading end, upon reaching the lower end of the punch prongs, in a lateral direction by the compacted interior portions 0 of the work so that the staple legs become securely anchored in the work parts without penetrating through the entire thickness or these parts. The final position or the inserted staple is shown in Fig. 13. Release of the two treadles then results in a, withdrawal of the work from the punch 136 and in an elevation of the driver I38 with relation to the punch into the position illustrated in Fig.9. I

It already has been'mentioned that'the invention is capable of embodiment m'maoy "forms and as a third e'Xainple of an embodimentof the invention'may be mentioned the insertion of a fiber peg into work parts by a cylindrical driver which has 'a cupped lower end and is given two strokes during one inserting cycle. The first stroke of the driver 292, as illustrated in Fig. 14, results in a 'hole being punched partway into the work and dueto the cupped end of the driver an interior-portion' of the work between the bottom of the punched hole and the opposite or lower surfao'e'of'the 'work'becornes considerably compressed so that the seeing 2M, thereafter inserted into the punched hole by the same driver during its second stroke, becomes upset or flared outat its lower extremity when impinging upon the just-mentioned compressed interior I portion of the work at the bottom of the hole punched therein, and the upper end of the peg u'pon being driven beyond the confining inner walls of; the driver nozzle 208, becomes compacted outward the continued driving to forrna flared head on the upper extremity of the fastening.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secureby Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. In a method of inserting a fastening into stock, the steps of first densely compacting an interior portion of the stock by punching an aperture into the stock without removing a e v he m. e h. the f eet h t e l h e hre re el tee wer l ehh, its e h nd by dr th te hih e eihet hrf ei ti n. d t ereby ehe he ee hl eeihe d to enter a dJ'ee h h h-eeth ee e l ,i ertieh- In a ethed hf i se t n .ieth iinin h iht stock having si e rfeeee th teps eu pertihe the s el; with one he. ehr e ee ee e a ns a fixe up t dehe eempeetihe an ior po t n the teels hr hhheh e ah. a rt into t e te here the o heeit r a t f i h u penet et ete e reteht d a e .Withe t. rem he any te a rom heheeyehert eh ei hes eeh, and i se i a a ning. int th .ete k. such, a a o o h a e ture that he lead ng nd o o o t e ee eh nebeeemes deflec ed b the pa ed pe h o a hehe mh te e tion of the stock. 7 v

3- In a et d of inser i yelet inte'oste h and p e g the e i end por ion nth ey l W t the etq the e ehe densel em.- paeting an interio per ieh hi the e eek. b pu a an u a .a er eh vih h beveled bottom wall a tewe n o. the teek ith ut removing any material from the body portion of the stock to compact the portion or" the stock at the bottom of the aperture into a dense mass, n ert n a e e e nt the a erture and drivin it ho th eby eihe he l adin end th Y eyelet to become laterally deflected by the coinpa d rt V. h a e t f. ihee t he a teele ee hh, e e e ha in ees. pro ided h] ateral b n h p r i he the. QPSQf engagi th lat rally be end nertiens and push g them bodily part-way into-the stock, thereby compacting portions or the stock ahead of the laterally bent portions of the partially inserted staple, engaging the bar of the staple and driving it home thereby causing the bent portions of the 11 staple to move in the direction in which they extend into noncompacted portions of the stock.

5. In a method of inserting staples into work pieces which consists in inserting a staple partway into a work piece by engagement with laterally bent portions formed on the legs of the staple, and then completing the insertion of the staple into the work by engagement with the bar of the staple.

6. In a machine for inserting a staple into stock, the staple having legs provided with laterally bent end portions, means for engaging and supporting the laterally bent end portions of the staple, means for causing said end portions to enter into the stock thereby compacting portions of the stock ahead of said end portions and inserting the staple part-way, a driver engaging the bar of the staple and for driving the staple home thereby causing said end portions of the staple to move in the direction in which they extend into noncompacted portions of the stock and causing the staple legs to become progressively deflected by said compacted portions.

7. In a machine for inserting a staple into stock, the staple having legs provided with laterally bent end portions, a machine frame, a punch fixed in the machine frame and supporting the laterally bent staple portions, a support for the stock, means for moving the support heightwise with relation to the punch thereby pushing the laterally bent staple portions bodily into the stock as well as compacting portions of the stock ahead of the laterally bent staple portions and inserting the staple part-Way, a reciprocating driver engaging the bar of the staple and driving it home thereby causing the bent portions of the staple to move in the direction in which they extend into noncompacted portions of the stock and causing the remainder of the staple legs to become progressively deflected in the same direction by said compacted portions.

8. In a machine for inserting a staple into stock, the staple having legs provided with laterally bent end portions, a machine frame, a punch fixed in the machine frame and supporting the laterally bent staple portions, means for adjusting the punch with relation to the machine frame, a support for the stock, means for moving the support heightwise with relation to the punch thereby pushing the laterally bent staple portions bodily into the stock as well as compacting portions of the stock ahead of the laterally bent staple portions and inserting the staple part way, a reciprocating driven engaging the bar of the staple and driving it home thereby causing the bent portions of the staple to move in the direction in which they extend into noncompacted portions of the stock and causing the remainder of the staple legs to become progressively defiected in the same direction by said compacted portions.

9. In a machine for inserting a staple into stock, the staple having legs provided with laterally bent end portions, a machine frame, a punch fixed in the machine frame and supporting the laterally bent staple portions, means for adjusting the punch with relation to the machine frame, a support for the stock, means for moving the support heightwise with relation to the punch thereby pushing the laterally bent staple portions bodily into the stock as well as compacting portions of the stock ahead of the laterally bent 12 staple portions and inserting the staple part-way, a reciprocating driver engaging the bar of the staple and driving it home thereby causing the bent portions of the staple to move in the direction in which they extend into noncompacted portions of the stock and causing the remainder of the staple legs to become progressively defiected in the same direction by said compacted portions, and means for adjusting the active stroke of the driver.

10. In a machine for inserting a staple into stock, the staple having legs provided with laterally bent end portions, a machine frame, a twolegged punch fixed in the machine frame and supporting the laterally bent staple portions, 2. support for the stock, means for moving the support heightwise with relation to the punch thereby pushing the laterally bent staple portions bodily into the stock as well as compacting portions of the stock ahead of the laterally bent staple portions and inserting the staple part-way, a reciprocating driver mounted for movement with relation to the punch and engaging the bar of the staple and driving it home thereby causing the bent portions of the staple to move in the direction in which they extend into noncompacted portions of the stock and causing the remainder of the staple legs to become progressively deflected in the same direction by said compacted portions.

11. In a method of inserting fastenings into stock, the steps of first compacting an interior portion of the stock by applying pressure through one means to the stock to form an aperture without removing any material therefrom, and then forcing said fastening against said portion by a second means thereby progressively deflecting said fastening along its length and causing the leading end to enter an adjacent non-compacted portion.

HERMAN A. IMHOF.

REFERENCES CITED UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 63,904 Juge Apr. 16, 1867 519,788 Carpenter May 15, 1894 630,359 I Kinsell Aug. 8, 1899 1,278,811 Glass Sept. 10, 1918 1,373,671 Rasmussen Apr. 5, 1921 1,450,244 Brogan Apr. 3,1923 1,500,926 Curry July 8, 1924 1,518,065 Hall Dec. 2, 1924 1,675,787 Carr July 3, 1928 1,676,647 Glines July 10, 1928 1,692,182 Mayer Nov. 20, 1928 1,717,130 Weaver June 11, 1929 1,748,951 Gookin Mar. 4, 1930 1,910,688 Goodstein May 23, 1933 2,007,274 Johnson July 9, 1935 2,080,634 Schafroth May 18, 1937 2,153,874 Posnack Apr. 11, 1939 2,158,242 Maynard May 16, 1939 2,232,994 Bernstein Feb. 25, 1941 2,261,734 Ricks Nov. 4, 1941 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 377,571 Germany Jan. 22, 1923

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US63904 *Apr 16, 1867Himself And ThomasImprovement in eyeleting machines
US519788 *Apr 20, 1892May 15, 1894 carpenter
US630359 *Dec 30, 1898Aug 8, 1899James L KinsellPunching and riveting machine.
US1278811 *May 3, 1915Sep 10, 1918United Shoe Machinery CorpEyeleting-machine.
US1373671 *Nov 7, 1919Apr 5, 1921Martin RasmussenEyeleting-machine
US1450244 *Nov 26, 1919Apr 3, 1923United Shoe Machinery CorpArt of finishing the edges of perforations
US1500926 *Oct 7, 1918Jul 8, 1924Charles M CurryAnvil
US1518065 *Mar 15, 1923Dec 2, 1924Bicknell HallHole-punching and eyelet-setting machine
US1675787 *Aug 25, 1925Jul 3, 1928Carr Fastener Co LtdFastener
US1676647 *Jul 6, 1920Jul 10, 1928Peerless Machinglines
US1692182 *May 27, 1927Nov 20, 1928Milwaukee Saddlery CompanyMethod of inserting tubular rivets
US1717130 *Jul 25, 1927Jun 11, 1929Weaver Mfg CoBrake-band-servicing machine
US1748951 *Oct 9, 1922Mar 4, 1930United Shoe Machinery CorpMethod of inserting fasteners
US1910688 *Aug 3, 1931May 23, 1933Bella GoodsteinStaple
US2007274 *May 3, 1933Jul 9, 1935United Shoe Machinery CorpCam-motion
US2080634 *Jun 6, 1935May 18, 1937Werner SchafrothStapling device
US2153874 *Nov 6, 1936Apr 11, 1939Emanuel R PosnackStapling device and method
US2158242 *Oct 8, 1936May 16, 1939Boston Wire Stitcher CoStaple for blind stitching
US2232994 *Apr 2, 1940Feb 25, 1941Samuel S BernsteinFastening means
US2261734 *Nov 3, 1939Nov 4, 1941United Shoe Machinery CorpShoemaking
DE377571C *Dec 12, 1920Jun 22, 1923Ganzhorn GebMaschine zum Lochen, Stanzen und zum Eindruecken von Knoepfen, OEsen, Haken u. dgl.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2884153 *Apr 27, 1954Apr 28, 1959American Optical CorpOphthalmic tool devices
US3200487 *Nov 12, 1963Aug 17, 1965Aubrey L HilscherMethod and means to produce folders with eyelets and tangs
US4490904 *May 3, 1982Jan 1, 1985Burndy CorporationApparatus and method for installing electrical connectors on flat conductor cable
US4515302 *Dec 21, 1981May 7, 1985Gemcor Engineering Corp.Riveting machine
US4630362 *Mar 27, 1985Dec 23, 1986Burndy CorporationApparatus for installing electrical on flat conductor cable
US6138419 *Jan 29, 1997Oct 31, 2000Mitsubishi Chemical CorporationBuilding panel obtained by riveting method
US6253434 *Feb 8, 1999Jul 3, 2001Qingdao Gyoha Plastics Co., Ltd.Eyelet and press machine for attachment of eyelets
US20090070983 *Sep 17, 2008Mar 19, 2009Michael StumpfSelf-piercing element
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/432.1, 29/432, 227/58, 29/512
International ClassificationA43D100/00, A43D100/02
Cooperative ClassificationA43D100/02
European ClassificationA43D100/02