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Publication numberUS2618595 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 18, 1952
Filing dateApr 5, 1949
Priority dateApr 5, 1949
Publication numberUS 2618595 A, US 2618595A, US-A-2618595, US2618595 A, US2618595A
InventorsGloor Walter E
Original AssigneeHercules Powder Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Well drilling composition
US 2618595 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Nov. 18, 1952 U NlrEo STATES PATENT 4 option j 2,618,595 WELL DRILLING COMPOSITION Walter E. Gloor, Wilmington, 'DeL, assignorto Hercules Powder Company, Wilmington, DeL, acorporation of'Delaware i No Drawing. Application April 5, 1949, Serial No. 85,727

This invention relates in general to an oil well drilling mud and, in particular, relates to a water base or emulsion base oil well drilling mud :or the like containing a carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose'or. salt thereof. i

In the rotary drilling of oil wells, it is common practice to employ a drilling mud which is circulatedfthrough th hollow drill pipe and over the cutting edges of the drill. The principal purposes of the drilling mud are to remove cuttings from the hole, maintaining them in a state of suspension during operation and whenever drilling is temporarily halted; to form a thin, impervious, tough wall in the hole, which prevents caving or scaling of the wall and likewise prevents loss of water from th hole; to

provide hydrostatic pressure, preventing gases and liquids from the surrounding strata from entering the hole; and to act as a cooling medium for the drill. In order to perform these functions satisfactorily,'the drilling mud must have certain characteristics varying, ofcourse, with the type of formation beingdrilled,;but nevertheless, generally similar. Thus, for ex-.-

ample-a relatively low viscosity is required to i permit a satisfactory rate of circulation with the consequent quick removal of cuttings from the drilling edge and simultaneous cooling of the drill. At the same time, however, the viscosity must be sufiiciently high to maintain the cuttings in suspension and carry them away from; the Work zone and the mud, furthermore, should be thixotropic, to prevent settlingof the cuttings-when drilling is temporarily halted.

Another characteristic of the drilling mud which should-be stable with respect to large qua'ntities ofthese compounds and, particularly, wa ten-soluble compounds of this type. And, of course, all. these properties must be possessed and retained while'filter loss, or loss through the Wall-of the drilled well, is held to a mini 'Nowin accordance with the present invention, acarboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose ether which may be prepared, for example, by treating cellulose with a hydrcxyethylating agent and with a carboxymethylating agent is incorporated in a small quantity in an aqueous suspension of clay ingredients such as clay and other materials. The highly satisfactory improvements-in drillingmuds-hav been obtained 4 Claims. (Cl. 252- 85) 2 increasingly through the use of an increasing amount of the substantially water-soluble carboxymeth'yl hydroxyethyl cellulose or its appropriate 'salt, preferably employing the cellulose derivative in the order of about. to about 4% of the total composition and usually about 1 to 1 /2 The drilling mud thus produced is characterized by valuabl properties, and particularly is characterized by maintaining these .DrillingFluicls, API Code No. 29, 2nd ed., July 1942). .Particular test'inethods employed were density,.viscosity, gelstrength immediately after stirring, gel strength onstanding for-10 mmutes, and filtration and wall building properties.

In the use of this invention, the carboxy methyl hydroxyethyl cellulose has been, and may be, added to conventional drilling mud constituents including, for example, clays, viscosity control agents, weighting materials, and the like, as generally employedin the formulation of drilling'muds. U

The general nature of the invention having been set forthand the general procedures having been defined, the following examples are cited as specific illustrations of the invention, but not in limitation thereof.

EXAMPLEl To a vigorously stirred slurryof 30 parts by weight of cotton linters in 750 parts by volume of '37 %"isopropanol was added 24 parts by weight of 50% "sodium hydroxide dropwise over a periodof l'l'mintues at room temperature. After 30 minutes of additional stirring, there was added to the mixture 8.9 parts by weight of ethylene oxide in 50 parts by volume of anhydrous isopropanol. While the stirring was continued, the temperature was then raised to 70 C. and was maintained between 68 and 73 C; for a period of one hour. A solution of 35 parts by weight of monochloracetic acid dissolved in 35 parts by volume of anhydrous isoprop'anol was added to the mixture over a period. of 15 minutes. The stirring was then continued for an additional 2 hours and 10 minutes after which the heating wasstopped and. the product al towed to stand for 18 hours at room tempera: ure.

A substantially water-soluble mixed; cellulose ether was recovered from the reaction product as follows. The reaction liquor was drained off and the fibrous product was stirred in 70% methanol neutralized to phenol phthalein with acetic acid and was washed free of salts with 70% methanol. The fibrous product was then dehydrated with an anhydrous methanol and dried at 70 C. There resulted a carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose having a hydroxyethyl substitution of 0.22 and a carboxymethyl substitution of 0.62. A 2% aqueous solution of the product was fiber-free and clear.

A drilling mud was prepared employing a, commercial West Texas clay which is resistant to the effect of salt and which is known to the trade as Ez Mix and also employing a small amount of Wyoming-type bentonite'which is characterized by being readily dispersible in water; These materials were prepared in the form of a drilling mud together with controlled amounts of water,

tion viscosity of 26,800 cps. in 6% aqueous solution, and identified in Table '1 as CMHEC (I), a

carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose having a hydroxyethyl substitution of 0.73 and a carboxymethyl substitution of 0.354, having a solution viscosity of 7190 cps. in 6% aqueous solution, and

I and a carboxymethyl substitution of 0.39, having a solution viscosity of 10,330 cps. in 4% aqueous solution, and identified in Table l as CMHEC (IV). The 'results of the tests previously described as applied to these muds are set forth in the table, in comparison with results for the barium sulfate and calcium sulfate. Specifically, formulations containing no additive.

4 Table Viscosity k i Watei Filter Initial Gel Test compo- Drilling mud composition Eg loss in cake f g gel Strength sition No. and formulations min. Thickness i strength in 10 min.

7 g (ml.) (inches) 85??? (grams) (grams) A H 11.0 68. 0 64 20 28 31 A, with 1% GMHEC (1) l1. 0 4. 8 %4 56 5 4 A, with'l% CMHEC (11)"... 11.3 4. 8 2 64 28 5 5 A, with 1% CMHEO (111).... 11.3 3. 4 A4 45 6 8 A, with 1% CMHEC (1V)' ll. 1 6.2 364 87 21 115 B (contains sodium chloridc)- 11. 7 72. 0 %4 l7 18 24 B, with 1% OMHEC (1).. 11.7 7.6 1 /64 37 5 5 B, with 1% CMHEC (IV) 11. 8 8. 4 is; 5 B, with l CMHEC (I) ll. 8 4. 4 L134 127 18 77 G (contains calcium chloride). 11.9 76. 0 %4 l5 16 23 C, with 1% GMHEC (I)'.:; ll. 4 4. 2 $64 47 4 6 C, w th 1% CMHEC (11)..." ll. 8 3. 2 $64- 61 l2 l C, w th 1% OMHEC (111).... l2. 0 4. 4 %4 28 4 .8 G, with 1% GMHEC (IV).. 12.1 10. 6 96.; 30 6 8 a drilling mud was prepared by mixing together In evaluating the data in the table, it was 6.9 parts Ea Mix, 0.69 part bentonite, 0.17 part generally considered that a water loss of less a basic composition as indicated below, using the clay and bentonite of Example 1.

Formula A B C 1 Percent Percent Percemv Clay 9O 6. 08 6. 08 Bentonite. .69 61 .61 Calcium sull'at .17 15 .15 Barium sulfate. 25.00 21. 98 1.1. 95 Sodium chloride 12.00 Calcium chloride 12.00 Water 67. 24 5 18 59.18

To these'formulations were added carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose mixed ethers prepared according to the procedure of Example 1 and characterized as follows: A carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose having a hydroxyethyl substitution of 0.18 hydroxyethyl groups per an-. hydro glucose unit and 0.42 carboxymethyl groups per anhyclro glucose unit, having a solu-,

than about 10 ml. in 30 minutes is critically necessary and that below 10 ml. in 30 minutes a smaller loss is increasingly more satisfactory; that a preferred viscosity is somewhat higher than the viscosity of the mud containing no cellulose derivative and that a viscosity as high as about cps. was satisfactory; that the initial gel strength should be not higher than about 10 grams, and that the gel strength in 10 minutes shouldbe not higher than about 30 grams, not significantly lower than about 10 grams and oer-'- tainly not below about 5 grams. Applying these criteria to the drilling muds containing the carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose, the conclusion is generally stated that these drilling muds are satisfactory. In particular, it is noted that the extremely important property of viscosity as imparted by the carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose is highly satisfactory in that the viscosity of the drilling mud is improved not only in the absence of salt and calcium contaminants, but also in that a drilling mud containing even larg quantities of sodium chloride or calcium chloride still has its viscosity greatly improved through the use of carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose. It is also noted that the use of a slightly larger amount of the carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose such as, for example, 1 permits the formation of a relatively high viscosity drilling mud even in the presence of extremely large quantities of salt contaminants, it being understood that in certain instances an increased viscosity may be desirable With reference to the-gel strength of the compositions, it is noted that the strength is substantially satisfactory for a drilling mud containing carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose and, particularly, that the gel strength is not seriously impaired by the presence of salt contaminants. With reference to the test compositions set forth in Table 1, it is noted that each and every one of the carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose materials may be usefully employed to produce a drilling mud with desirable gel characteristics.

In comparative tests, Formulas A, B, and C were prepared and mixed with 1% sodium carboxymethylcellulose, employing a commercial product with a substitution of about 0.7 carboxymethyl groups per anhydro glucose unit. The significant test results on these compositions containing 1% carboxymethylcellulose were (Formula A) water loss 5.0 ml. per 30 min.; viscosity, 45 cps.; initial gel strength, 5 gms.; minute gel strength, 11 gms.; (Formula B) water loss 5.4 ml. per 30 min. viscosity, 19 cps.; initial gel strength, 3 gms.; 10 minute gel strength, 7 gms.; and (Formula C) water loss 9.2 ml. per 30 min.; viscosity, 17 gms.; initial gel strength, 4 gms.; 10 minute gel strength, 4 gms. Thus, the compositions containing carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose compare favorably in various properties with the compositions containing a typical cellulose derivative such as carboxymethylcellulose: particularly, the viscosity and water loss of drilling muds B and C, containing large quantities of sodium and calcium chlorides, were improved to a significantly greater degree through the addition of the preferred carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose than through the addition of carboxymethylcellulose.

What I claim and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

1. An aqueous well drilling mud containing a small quantity of a substantially water-soluble carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose having between about 0.35 and about 0.86 carboxymethyl group and between about 0.15 and about 0.73 hydroxyethyl group per anhydroglucose unit in the cellulose in an amount sufficient to improve the viscosity, resistance to water loss, and gel characteristics of said mud, and to maintain the aforesaid improved properties in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts acquired by said mud during drilling operations.

2. An aqueous well drilling mud containing a substantially water-soluble carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose having between about 0.35 and about 0.88 carboxymethyl group and between about 0.15 and about 0.73 hydroxyethyl group per anhydroglucose unit in the cellulose in an amount of about A; to about 4% of the total composition, said mud having improved viscosity, resistance to water loss, and gel characteristics and being characterized by retention of the aforesaid improved properties in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts acquired by the mud during drilling operations.

3. An aqueous well drilling mud containing a substantially water-soluble carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose having between about 0.35 and about 0.88 carboxymethyl group and between about 0.15 and about 0.73 hydroxyethyl group per anhydroglucose unit in the cellulos in an amount of about 1 to about 17 of the total composition, said mud having improved viscosity, resistance to water loss, and gel characteristics and being characterized by retention of the aforesaid improved properties in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts acquired by the mud durin drilling operations.

4. An aqueous well drilling mud comprising water containing sufiicient clay material to form a filter cake on the wall of the well and a small quantity of a substantially water-soluble carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose having between about 0.35 and about 0.88 carboxymethyl group and between about 0.15 and about 0.73 hydroxyethyl group per anhydroglucose unit in the cellulose in an amount sufiicient to improve the viscosity, resistance to Water loss, and gel characteristics of said mud, and to maintain the aforesaid improved properties in the presence of alkali and alkalin arth metal salts acquired by said mud during drilling operations.

WALTER E. GLOOR.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,425,768 Wagner Aug. 19, 1947 2,468,792 Wagner et al May 3, 1949 2,476,331 Swinehart et a1 July 19, 1949 2,510,153 Swinehart June 6, 1950 2,570,947 Himel et al Oct. 9, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2425768 *Aug 12, 1944Aug 19, 1947Phillips Petroleum CoDrilling fluids and method of use
US2468792 *Aug 18, 1947May 3, 1949Phillips Petroleum CoDrilling fluids and methods of using same
US2476331 *Nov 15, 1945Jul 19, 1949Dow Chemical CoMethod of making methyl carboxymethyl cellulose
US2510153 *Feb 26, 1949Jun 6, 1950Dow Chemical CoDrilling fluids stable in the presence of brines rich in polyvalent cations
US2570947 *Nov 5, 1945Oct 9, 1951Phillips Petroleum CoDrilling fluids and methods of using same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2909223 *May 5, 1952Oct 20, 1959Phillips Petroleum CoGypsum cements
US2985239 *Jun 25, 1956May 23, 1961Phillips Petroleum CoCement compositions and process of cementing wells
US2995189 *Mar 13, 1959Aug 8, 1961Phillips Petroleum CoHydraulic cements having an extended thickening time, methods of making the same, and processes employing the same
US3080316 *Sep 15, 1958Mar 5, 1963Johns ManvilleFire retardant and control composition
US3284353 *Sep 27, 1963Nov 8, 1966Hercules IncDrilling mud and process
US3446795 *Apr 16, 1965May 27, 1969Dow Chemical CoMixed cellulose ethers
US3448100 *Apr 18, 1968Jun 3, 1969Dow Chemical CoManufacture of carboxymethyl hydroalkyl mixed cellulose ethers
US4451389 *Jan 28, 1982May 29, 1984Phillips Petroleum CompanyAqueous gels
US7008479May 5, 2004Mar 7, 2006Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.Methods and cement compositions for cementing in subterranean zones
US20040094069 *Jul 30, 2003May 20, 2004Jiten ChatterjiMethods and cement compositions for cementing in subterranean zones
Classifications
U.S. Classification507/113, 106/720, 106/803
International ClassificationC09K8/02, C09K8/20
Cooperative ClassificationC09K8/206
European ClassificationC09K8/20C