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Publication numberUS2619249 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 25, 1952
Filing dateMar 22, 1948
Priority dateMar 22, 1948
Publication numberUS 2619249 A, US 2619249A, US-A-2619249, US2619249 A, US2619249A
InventorsWhittington Emmett H
Original AssigneeWhittington Emmett H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Crate
US 2619249 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 25', 1952 E. H. WHITTINGTON CRATE 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 22. 1948 INVENTOR. ELMZIJE'TTH WHITTZNGTUN 7 BY ATTORNEY Nov. 25, 1952 E. H. WHITTINGTQN CRATE 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 22. 1948 VII/II INVENTOR. .EJWETTIZ WHTTTINBTUN B Y AT TDHZVTE' Y I Nov. 25, 1952 E. H. WHITTINGTON CRATE Filed March 22. 1948 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. EMT? 1.1. WITTINBTON BY W ATTDBAZEY Nov. 25, 1952 E. H. WHITTINGTON CRATE 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed March 22. 1948 IN VENTDH EMMETT H WHITTIZVBTUN ATTORNEY Patented Nov. 25, 1952 UNITED STATES ATE NT OFFICE 15 Claims. 1

This invention relates to crates for handling live fowl in transit, and it is the object of the invention to provide a lightweight, sturdy, durable, sanitary crate which can be easily handled, and one which will minimize the loss in handling, resulting fromtheft, escape,v maiming, crushing or disease, and will insure delivery of the poultry to the destination in the best marketable condition.

In transporting chickens or other fowl to market, it is the prevailing, practice to load them into rectangular wooden crates approximately twenty-three inches wide, thirty-five inches long and twelve inches high. A full truckload of these crates may comprise one hundred and forty, loaded seven high, four across and five lengthwise of the truck.

The most common form of crate in use comprises a relatively heavy wooden bottom with sides, ends and. top, either of wooden spindles or rounds inserted into holes in the frame members, or slats nailed to the frame.

The disadvantages of crates of the above type are that they are heavy, are easily damaged in handling, which may result in them being opened. up for the escape or unauthorized removal of the contents, or so weakened in handling that they may be collapsed by the weight of other crates, resulting in injury or death to the fowl.

A further disadvantage inherent in the wooden crate is-that the wooden bottom provides a lodgment for disease infected litter, which is very difficult to dislodge, and may result in transmitting disease to a large number of fowl.

Since the crates are to be piled one upon the other, any protuberances, either on the top or bottom, such as protruding nails, or cracked or warped slats, or spindles which interfere with stacking the crates one upon the other, may result in the destruction of the crates if force is used to overcome the resistance offered by the obstructions.

In the structure of my invention I overcome all of the above listed defects by constructing a crate of non-corrosive lightweight material, preferably of aluminum alloys or other materials highly resistant to corrosion and selected for their hardness and resiliency, and I anchor.

the parts securely together. in intimate relation to eliminate cracks, crevices and openings likely to provide lodgment for infections, and all exterior protuberances likely to interfere with the stacking or handling of the crates.

A further important feature of my crate isthat it is adjustable asto height to accommodate fowl of different sizes, and also provides for the.

easy feeding of chickens in transit.

It is the practice in making long hauls to feed chickens at regular intervals. Since a chicken will'not attempt to stand up in a crate in which its head will come in contact with.

the top, and will not eat well whensitting down, it is the practice, when shipping with the pres-' ent wooden crates, to unload the trucks and transfer the chickens to feeding crates, and then. reload them into the carryingcrates- Considerable loss inweight and escape results from this extra handling, and it is a time and labor consuming operation.

With my adjustable crate, there are twometh ods which may be followed for the feeding. In one method the crates may be loadedat normal size onto the truck, unloaded at the feeding station, the tops raised to feeding position, and then lowered for reloading ontothe truck. This saves the losses resulting from the transfer from the crate to the feeding pens and back to the crate.

In the other method, the crates may be adjusted to feeding height before loading onto the truck and the chickens fed in transit. The additional height added to the load by; this method may be compensated by omitting one layer of crates from the load.

Features of novelty" relate to the arrangement for height adjustment, tostructulal details and assembly of parts for producing a sturdy structure capable of standing abuse without injury, and one which is free from protuberances'or rough edges likely to interfere with the" crates sliding freely one over the other, or resulting in handling hazards.

Other features which result in, producing' 'the best facilities for preserving.- the health d Q'i'nfort of the fowl in transit, such assa-nitation.

and temperature conditions, will appear from the:

detaileddescription taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a perspective in full lines of a crate in a collapsed position.

Fig. 2 is a perspective in full linesgof the create in completely expanded position. for handling;*

Fig. 5 is a similar view showing the attachment of a bracing rod.

Fig. 6 is a detailed isometric view showing the joint between side and end frame members of the upper section of the crate.

Fig. '7 is an isometric view showing the joints between end and side members of the upper frame of the lower section.

Fig. 8 is an isometric view showing a corner joint of the end and frame members of the bottom of the crate.

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary section of a side frame member and bottom plate of the crate.

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary section of the end frame member and bottom plate.

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary section, with rod attached, of a top frame member of the lower section.

Fig. 12 is a fragmentary section of the side latching mechanism.

Fig. 13 is a plan view showing side and end positional latching mechanism with parts in section.

Fig. 14 is a top view with parts in section of operating mechanism for the side latch.

Fig. 15 is a fragmentary section of the parts shown in Fig. 14.

Fig. 16 is a fragmentary section of the end latch mechanism.

Fig. 17 is a detail sectional view of securing means for the lower end of a tubular member.

Fig. 18 is a detail sectional view of the fastening means for a rotatable end tubular member.

Fig. 19 is a fragmentary section of the door latching mechanism.

Fig. 20 is a view in side elevation of the crate with feeding trough attached, and

Fig. 21 is a fragmentary end view of the crate and feeding trough.

Referring first to Figs. 1 and 2, the crate illustrated comprises a lower section 5, and an upper section 6, which are adapted to be adjusted in spaced relation to each other, as will hereinafter more fully appear.

The lower section includes upper and lower rectangular frames 1 and 8, the upper frame being formed of side channel members 9-9 and end channel members I0l0. The lower frame comprises side channel members I3-l3 and end channel members 14-44.

In the construction of these frames, the abutting ends of the end and side channel members 9 and ID, of the upper frame portion of the lower section, are lapped together to produce a joint which is flush with the surfaces of the channel members 9 and I0. This joint is produced by cutting away the inner flange I of the channel 10 for a distance equal to the width of the channel 9, and cutting off the plate 2 of the channel 10 for a distance equal to the width of the channel 9, so that when the channels 9 and ID are brought together at their ends in abutting relation, the adjacent surfaces will be flush with each other.

The same procedure is followed in connection with the frame members 15 and 16 of the upper section of the crate.

The channel members I3 and I4, comprising the bottom frame, are each provided in one flange with a groove ll (Figs. 9 and 10) extending longitudinally thereof, and of a depth equal to the thickness of a bottom plate 20, the side channel members 13 being deeper than the end channels M.

The flanges of the side channels 13 of the lower frame are at right angles to the plate portion, but each of the end channels 14 has a sloping flange 2! which extends inwardly over the bottom plate 20 to provide an unrestricted flow for a flushing stream of water for cleaningthe crate. The inner flange 3 of the side channel 13 is cut away at an angle corresponding with the slope of flange 2| on the end channel 14, and the plate 13 overlaps the plate of channel member I4. An opening 4 is provided through the ends of overlapping portions of members 13 and I 4 to receive a tubular member 22.

The frame portions 7 and 8 are spaced apart and secured together by means of a plurality of tubular members 22 of aluminum alloy, there being one of these tubular members for each corner, two intermediate each side, and one intermediate each end. Spaced at equal distances apart around the periphery of the bottom section and between the tubular members 22-22, are a plurality of aluminum rods 23 which extend through the plates of the channel members 9, I0, I 3 and 14, comprising the upper and lower frame members of the lower section.

The tubular members 22 22 also extend through the plate portions of these channels, and at their lower ends they are provided with tightly fitting plugs, such as 25, shown in Fig. 17, to receive a flatheaded machine screw 26 extending through an opening in the bottom plate 20 and countersunk therein to securely clamp the bottom plate 20 to the structure. The upper end of each of the tubular members which extends through the plate of its correspondin frame member 9 is provided with a peripheral slot 29 of sufficient width to receive and permit free movement of the latching mechanism to be hereinafter described. Also as shown in Fig. 12, the upper end of each of the tubular members 22 is reduced in diameter to provide a shoulder portion 24 which abuts the lower faces of the channel members 9 and 10.

The bottom plate 20 comprises a sheet of heavy aluminum, the edges of which are turned up, as at 21, to engage the longitudinal grooves ll in the lower end and side frame members 13 and I4, as shown in Figs. 9 and 10.

a In the assembly of this section of the crate, the bottom plate 23 will be sprung into position upon the frame members 13 and I4 to grip them together tightly, and to provide a completely smooth bottom surface which will permit the easy sliding of one crate upon the top of another.

The upper section 6 of the crate comprises in addition to the end and side channels 16-46, channels 30 and 3|, extending longitudinally of the upper frame intermediate of its sides for strengthening and bracing this frame portion and providing tracks for the door 31, and also transversely extending rods 32 and 33 which extend through the channels 30 and 3| and are attached by means of screws to the side channel members |5i5. Aluminum rods 35 also positioned transversely of the upper section extend through holes in the channel members 30 and 3| and through holes in the inside flange of the channel members l5-l5. The space defined by the intersections of the channels 30 and 31, and the rods 32 and 33, frames an opening for a door 31, which lies below the top surface of the upper section, and is adapted to he slid longitudinally for inserting and removing fowl from the crate.

Secured to the side and end members [5 and 16 of the frame of the upper section are a plurality of aluminum rods 38-38 which are spaced apart the same distance asthetubular. members 22-22 of the lower section of thecrate, and are adapted to telescope into these tubular members for the purposeof providing for the relative ad'- justment of the two sections. All of the rods except the two designated as. 38' are firmly anchored against rotation in the frame members l and I6, and eachwof the corner and side rods is provided on its inner periphery with three spaced apart notches or indentations 39, such.

as shown in Fig. 12, adapted to cooperate with a latching strip 40, movable longitudinally of the side channel members 9 of the upper frame of the lower section 5. The two rods 38' are each secured in place by means of a shouldered screw 35, shown in Fig. 15, to permit of their free rotation. These rods 38 are each provided at their upper ends with a square'portion M, adapted to receive a flat metal operating lever 42, which levers extend through openings or slots 43 in the inside flanges of the side frame members l5--l5, and are connected with restoring springs 44, attached to the insides of the channel members l5|5.

The longitudinally extending strips 45, located in the channels 9-9, are provided along one edge with a plurality of curved notches 45 of substantially thesame radius of curvature as the rods 38 and 38' (Fig. 13). The strips 50 lie along the inner flanges of the channels 99 and have their inner edges in sliding contact with the channels. The opposite edges, with the curved notches A5, lie in the peripheral slots 29 m the tubular members 22 (Figs. 12 and. 13). Normally the strips 40 lie in such position that one edge or corner of each of the curved notches 55 engages the notches 39 about midway of their faces to lock the rods 38- and 38' against longitudinal movement in their tubular members. When it is desired to elevate or lower the upper section, the operating levers and rods 38' are rotated. The lever d2. illustrated in Figs. 14 and 15 is swung in a clockwise direction to cause the flat faces of the notched'portions of the rod 38' to engage the adjacent corner of the curved notches of the strip 40 with a camming action to slide it longitudinally of the channel member 9 for a suficient distance to permit the notches 39 inthe sliding rods 38 to clear the edges of the locking strip 60, thereby permitting longitudinal movement of the sliding rods in the tubular members 22. When the operator releases the pressure upon the operating lever 42, the restoring spring Mrotates the lever 42 and rod 38' in a counter-clockwise direction, permitting thev spring 46, having one end attached to the inside of channel 9 and its other end to the strip 45, to draw the lever and latching strip 40 back into normal position when all of the notches in the rods 38 are brought opposite to the edge of the locking strip 40. The upper section will then be locked in position corresponding to the particular set of notches opposite the locking strip;

Additional, latching means applied to the ends of the crate may be provided by making the tubular members 22' at each end of the crate rotatable, inthe channel members l0 and I l, and for thispurpose, the lower ends of these tubular. members are rotatably secured to the bottom channels 14 and the bottom plate 20 by inserting into the lower ends of the tubular members plugs 52, and using shoulder screws 53, which are countersunk into the bottom member 20. as shownin Fig. 18.

The end rods 38', which fit into thesetubular' members 22' are securely fastenedto'theichannel;

members [6 by. means of screws 55, andare milled off for a partof'theirv lengths to provide: flat portions 56,. and. into these flat portions are more deeply notched portions 51', formed by milling. These notched portions 51 are adaptedto cooperate with spring-pressed pivotal latches 58, pivotally supportedibetween the flanges of. the channel members 10. The upper ends of the tubular members 22" are reduced in diametenas at. 59, to extend through the channel'membersv I0, and these reduced portions are providedwith circumferential slots 60 in which the latches 5B normallyv rest to engage correspondinglylocated notches 57 in the sliding rods.

The tubular members 22' are eachprovide'd with a knurled portion 6| which enables: it to be rotated by hand until the edges of theperipheral notches engage-the latches58 to force themout wardly against the springs 63 andthe ends of studs 52 (Fig. 13),v to unlock the rods 38;- thuspermitting the longitudinal movement of the rods in the tubular members. 22'.- The studs 62 limit the outward movement of the latches- 58 to such an extent that the lower shoulders 54 of the lower notches 51 (Fig. 16) will not clear the inner edge of the latches 58.

With the positional latching means above de-- into the channels 9 and H3 above the locking parts.

The sliding door 37, previously referred to, comprises a pair of side channel members 'H] and- H, and a plurality of aluminum rods 12, extend-' ing through these side channel members; and secured. thereto by means of screws extending through the webs of the channel members. In assembling the crate with the door in place, the upper flanges 73 of the channel members '18 and H are made to engage the lower flanges of the channel members 3 and 3| in sliding engagement therewith. Slidably and rotatably mounted upon the center one of the door rods 12 is a sleeve 75, which is urged toward one end of the rod bymeans of a coiled spring 75, surrounding therod 12, and engaging one end of the sleeve 75. At its opposite end, the sleeve 15 is provided with a projecting ear or tab 11 adapted to slide through a hole in the channel member 10 to engage a cavity or depression in a block- 85, secured to the channel member 30, to lock the door 31 against movement. A slot 18, through the sleeve 15, en-- gages a pin 19, projecting from the rod 12, normally to retain the latch member against rotation out of locking position.

Drainage holes are provided through the bottom plate 20 to prevent the accumulation of water.

In Fig. 20 the crate is illustrated in position for the feeding of chickens, and it shows the upper section 6 raised to a height of about two inches from the lower section 5, and a feeding trough 82 hung upon the upper frame portion of the lower section by means of supporting hooks 7 83. Fig. 21 shows a fragmentary end view of the parts illustrated in Fig. 20.

The entire crate as above described, with the exception of the side latching strips 40 and'the springs, all of which are of stainless or rust resisting steel, is constructed of aluminum or aluminum alloys, especially selected for their qualities of hardness and resiliency, and this provides a crate which will be long lived because of its toughness, and the fact that there will be no deterioration of the materials because of destructive oxidation. Since aluminum is an excellent reflector of heat and the suns rays, the suffering endured by the fowl, and the loss of weight because of excessive heat will be greatly minimized and much less than would be suffered from transporting the fowl in a wooden crate under the same conditions.

Another advantage which I believe results from the use of the solid aluminum bottom plate is based upon a discovery made by me that aluminum when very cold will not stick to the bare skin of a human as will other metals, such as brass, copper and iron. It is my theory based upon this discovery that since the aluminum is an excellent reflector of heat that contact between the chickens in the crate, either through their feet Or their bodies will result in the heat from the feet and bodies of the chicken being reflected back into the chicken rather than being absorbed by the metal. The same would be true with respect to the side and end portions of the crate which are also of aluminum.

In the assembly of my structure, I preferably provide holes in the channel members slightly less in diameter than the rods 23 for receiving the rods, and make my assembly by pressing the rods into the holes in the channels, thereby eliminating the use of a large number of screws or other clamping means. I have found that this provides a permanent and rigid structure due to the face that the joints between the rods and the channels when assembled under pressure exert a so-called self-welding action which produces a firm joinder of all of the parts so assembled.

Since the material selected for the construction of the crate is hard and resilient, the dropping of the crate upon a corner, and end, or a side when removing it from a truck, will not result in any permanent distortion likely to interfere with the smooth operation of the movable parts.

Since the exterior surface of the bottom of the crate is perfectly smooth and all of the joints are either of flush surfaces or are covered by the plate portions of the channel members, there will be no protuberances or obstructions likely to interfere with the sliding of one crate upon another in loading and unloading a truck.

A further advantage of the aluminum construction is that it reduces to a minimum the weight to be hauled, and that to be lifted by those who have to handle the crates, thereby reducing the expense of handling the extra weight which the use of wooden crates entails over the use of the aluminum crates. The average weight of wooden crates is twenty-five pounds, whereas the weight of my aluminum crate is' fifteen pounds. This difference in weight results in a saving of 1,400 pounds per truck load.

The crate may be easily scrubbed and thoroughly disinfected with a high pressure stream of water or other disinfectant, and the litter may be flushed from the bottom of the crate when the fowl are in it.

By joining the connecting ends of the frame members in abutting and overlapping relation, the likelihood of these parts being separated or distorted as a result of shocks or blows at the corners or along the length of any frame member is reduced to a minimum.

Moreover, since the spaced apart rods and the sheet metal bottom, which are joined to the frame members, have great resiliency, the structure is highly resistant to permanent distortion in any direction resulting from rough usage.

It will be apparent that in the structure described, the parts are so united that each separate part provides a shock absorbing element each in such relation to the others that any heavy blow upon any part of the structure will be transmitted through it in gradually decreasing increments of force in such a manner that ordinary forces on any one part will not result in permanent distortion or breakage of that part.

This characteristic of the structure is also of great advantage in securing and maintaining truck balance and equilibrium in hauling. In an ordinary truckload, the crates will be stacked seven high, and may be stacked eight or nine high, on trucks with underslung beds. When the truck is traveling at high speed around a curve, or is started or stopped suddenly, there is a re sulting force upon the load in a direction tending to force or tilt or slide the crates in the direction of the applied force. In most cases, this force will be absorbed by the resiliency of the crates before it will overcome the inertia and frictional resistance between crates or between crates and the truck body which might cause a bodily shift of the load. This feature reduces trafllc hazards and dangers of tipping and loss of load.

The assembly of the entire structure is such that any part may be easily replaced at a very nominal cost, thus providing a crate which is good for many years of service.

Although I have shown and. described my invention with respect to certain details of construction, it is to be understood that many modifications may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of my invention.

I claim:

1. A crate structure for handling live fowl comprising upper and lower rectangular frames of channeled aluminum strips secured together at their corners, each strip of the lower frame member being provided in the outer face of its outer flange with a longitudinal groove throughout its length, spaced apart aluminum rods secured at their opposite ends in upper and lower frame members to provide side and end sections for the structure, a bottom for the structure comprisin a sheet of aluminum provided with turned up edges adapted to engage the grooves in the lower channel members, and means for securing the bottom in place.

2. A crate structure for handling live fowl comprising upper and lower rectangular frames of channeled metal strips, the strips of each frame being secured together at their corners, metal rods secured at their opposite ends in corresponding upper and lower frame members to provide side and end closures for the structure, a plurality of spaced apart tubular members extending between the upper and lower frames and extending downwardly through the lower frame strips, a bottom for the structure comprisin a sheet of aluminum provided with turned up edges adapted to overlie the lower outside periphery of the lower frame and securing screws extending through the bottom member into the lower ends of the tubular members.

3. In a crate structure for handling live fowl, a lower frame comprising side and end channel members secured together at their corners with their flanges extending downwardly, the outside flanges of the strips being provided in their outer faces with longitudinally extending grooves and the inside flange of each end member being sloped inwardly, a bottom plate of sheet metal provided with turned up edges adapted to engage the grooves in the outer flanges of the channel frame members, means for securing the plate to the lower frame with its inside face in intimate contact with the flanges of the channels, an upper frame member and metal rods secured between the upper and lower frames for confining poultry.

4. In a crate for handling live poultry, a lower section having side and end walls constructed of spaced apart rods and tubular members, a sheet metal bottom closure for the lower section, an upper section comprising a top closure, depending rods attached to the top closure and slidable in the tubular members of the lower section, and latching means cooperating with the sliding rods and the tubular members for securing the upper section in different degrees of spaced relation to the lower section.

5. In a crate for handling live poultry, a lower section having end and side walls comprised of tubes with spaced apart metal rods between them and a sheet metal bottom closure, a top closure comprising a rectangular structure of spaced apart horizontal metal rods and a plurality of depending metal rods slidable in the tubes of the lower section, and adjustable latching means adapted to engage between the tubes of the lower section and the depending rods of the upper section to retain the two sections in adjusted spaced relation.

6. In a crate for handling live poultry, a lower section comprisin upper and lower rectangular frames of channeled metal strips, spaced apart metal rods and tubular members secured in spaced relation in the upper and lower channels to form side and end retaining structures, a rectangular top for the crate, a plurality of fixed rods secured to said top for sliding engagement in the tubular members of the lower section, and a pair of rods rotatably secured to the top section for rotation in its tubular member, each of,

said rods being provided with a latching surface and a latching member operable by rotation of a rotatable rod into and out of engagement between latching surfaces of the rods and the tubular members.

7. In a crate for handling live poultry, a lower section comprising upper and lower substantially rectangular frames of channeled strips, the strips of the upper frame having their webs faced downwardly, a plurality of spaced apart rods secured at their ends in the upper and lower frame members, tubular members secured at their lower ends in the lower frame members with their upper ends extending through the webs of the upper frame members, one tubular member upon each end being rotatably mounted and each of said tubular members being provided upon its upper end between the flanges of the upper frame members with a segmental slot through a portion of its circumference, a top closure for the crate, a plurality of rods secured to said top and having sliding engagement in the tubular members of the lower section, one rod at each side being rotatable and each of said rods being provided with a plurality of 'IOCkiIlg surfaces spaced longitudinally thereof, and latching strips lyingin the segmental slots of the tubular members and movable into and out of engagement with the locking surfaces of the sliding rods by rotation of the rotating rods.

8. In a crate for handling live poultry, a lower section comprising a bottom plate and upper and lower frame members of channeled metal strips, the flanges of the upper frame channels opening upwardly, a plurality of spaced apart rods secured at their ends in the upper and lower frame members, a plurality of tubular members secured at their lower ends to the lower side frame members with their upper ends extending through the webs of the upper side frame members and terminatin between the flanges thereof, each tubular member being provided in its upper'end with a segmental slot through a section of its circumference, a longitudinally movable latching strip located between the flanges of each upper side frame member in registration with the segmental slots in the corresponding tubular members, each latching strip being provided with a plurality of notches adapted in one longitudinal position of the strip to register with the segmental slots in the tubular members, a movable top for the crate including a rectangular frame comprising end and side members, a plurality of fixed and one rotatable rod depending from each top side frame member for sliding engagement within the tubular members, each of said rods being provided with a plurality of longitudinally disposed latching surfaces for engagement with the edge of the latching strip, and means for moving each latching strip longitudinally to simultaneously latch and unlatch the sliding rods of the top section.

9. In an adjustable crate for handling live poultry, an upper and a lower section, upwardly extending tubular members carried by the lower section, each provided near its upper end with a segmental slot through -a portion of its circumference, a-plurality of rods attached to the upper section two of which are rotatable and all of which are provided with longitudinally spaced latching surfaces, a latching strip for each side provided with a plurality of arcuate notches corresponding in number to the side rods and tubular members, said strip engaging the segmental slots with one portion of each arcuate notch lying in a portion of its corresponding slot, the portion of the notch adjacent the rotatable rod being movable by the rotation of the rotatable rod to move the latching strip in one direction longitudinally, a lever for rotating the rotatable rod, and a spring for moving the latching strip in the opposite direction.

10. In an adjustable crate for handling live poultry, upper and lower substantially rectangular sections, rigid tubular side members open at their tops, rotatable tubular end members open at their tops, rods depending from the upper section for sliding engagement with the tubular members, side latching mechanism between the upper and lower section controlled by the rotatable side rods, and end latching mechanism controlled by the rotatable tubular members.

11. In an adjustable crate for handling live poultry, upper and lower substantially rectangular crate sections, rigid tubular side members included in the side portions of the lower section, rotatable tubular members included in the end portions of the lower section, the upper ends of the side and end tubular members each being provided with a segmental slot through a portion of its circumference, depending rods carried by the upper section for slidable engagement with the tubular members of the lower section, each of said rods being provided in its surface with a plurality of longitudinally spaced latching surfaces, and a spring pressed pivotal latch member extendin through the segmental slot in the end of each of the rotatable tubular end members for engagement with the locking surfaces of the rods and operable by the rotation of the rotatable tubular member.

12. In an adjustable crate for the handling of live poultry, upper and lower substantially rectangular relatively adjustable sections, vertically disposed tubular members and rods carried by opposite sections for telescopic engagement with each other, said tubular members and rods being provided with relatively movable latching surfaces adapted to be brought into registering position by relative vertical movement of the two sections, and latching bars engageable with oppositely aligned latching surfaces to secure the two sections in a desired spaced relation.

13. A highly resilient crate structure for handling live poultry comprising top and bottom rectangular frame members, each comprising side and end channel members, the top frame members being firmly secured together at their ends, and each channel member being provided through its web portion with a plurality of spaced openings, a plurality of spaced apart resilient rods having their ends firmly embraced in the openings in the channels to form the end and side walls of the crate, and a bottom sheet of hard resilient material firmly secured to the bottom frame member and having four upstanding edges engaging and gripping the outer surfaces of the four bottom frame members.

'14. In an adjustable crate for handling live poultry, upper and lower substantially rectangular sections, open ended tubular side and end members carried by the side and end members of the lower section, depending side and end rods carried by the upper section for sliding engage- 12 ment within the tubular members of the lower section, each of said end rods being provided with a pair of upper latching notches and a lower latching and stop notch, and a latch member movable into and out of engagement with said notches.

15. In an adjustable crate, upper and lower rectangular sections, tubular side and end members carried by the lower section, depending side and end rods carried by the upper section for sliding engagement within the tubular members of the lower section, a pair of oppositely disposed ones or said rods being provided with a cutaway portion having a plurality of latching notches in its surface, the lower ones of said notches each having a shoulder projecting beyond the end of the cutaway surface, and a latching member engaged by said shoulder in the uppermost position of the upper section to limit the upward movement thereof.

EMMETT H. WHITTINGTON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 291,027 Burns Jan. 1, 1884 434,321 Cornish et al Aug. 12, 1890 639,628 Thomsen et a1 Dec. 19, 1899 679,730 Coughlan Aug. 6, 1901 844,955 Morgan Feb. 19, 1907 915,565 Davison Mar. 16, 1909 934,282 Carnefix Sept. 14, 1909 1,027,771 Ross May 28, 1912 1,135,231 Way Apr. 13, 1915 1,226,305 Buckley et a1. May 15, 1917 1,436,869 Eggert et a1. Nov. 28, 1922 1,453,005 Considine Apr. 24. 1923 1,575,374 Margolis et a1 Mar. 2, 1926 1,633,354 Rau June 21, 1927 2,010,121 Wesley Aug. 6, 1935 2,466,220 Ferguson Apr. 5, 1949

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2850199 *Dec 30, 1955Sep 2, 1958Rehrig Pacific CoMilk crate
US4040460 *Dec 23, 1975Aug 9, 1977Sidney ThorntonCollapsible bucket
US4066042 *Jan 27, 1976Jan 3, 1978Bright Charles RHollow plastic coop dowels with wood core
US5081723 *Aug 8, 1991Jan 21, 1992Saunders David RPlaypen with detachable sides used as security gates
US7350662 *Jul 5, 2005Apr 1, 2008Gatewood Products, LlcModular reusable vehicle shipping crate
US7762416Jan 2, 2008Jul 27, 2010Gatewood Products, LlcModular reusable vehicle shipping crate
US7762417Sep 21, 2007Jul 27, 2010Gatewood Products, LlcModular reusable vehicle shipping crate
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/8, 220/668, 220/324, 119/453
International ClassificationB65D85/50, B65D21/08, B65D21/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D21/08, B65D85/50
European ClassificationB65D21/08, B65D85/50