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Publication numberUS2619582 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 25, 1952
Filing dateMar 12, 1949
Priority dateMar 12, 1949
Publication numberUS 2619582 A, US 2619582A, US-A-2619582, US2619582 A, US2619582A
InventorsMorse John F
Original AssigneeMorse John F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Docking light installation for marine craft
US 2619582 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. F. MORSE DOCKING LIGHT INSTALLATION FOR MARINE CRAFT Filed March 12, 1949 Nov. 25, 1952 2 SHEETSSHEET 1 IN VEN TOR.

BY fa 212 .Zcgse @TZR N E/Y?C Patented Nov. 25, 1952 UNITED STATES DOCKING LIGHT INSTALLATION FOE MARINE CRAFT 4 Claims.

The present invention relates to improvements in the construction and installation of lights especially adapted and intended for craft of the power operated type. This invention is in the nature of an improvement in the Marine Docking Light shown in my prior application, Serial No. 62,689 filed November 30, 1948, now Patent No. 2,593,171, and is especially designed to improve the method of mounting lights of the character shown and described therein.

These lights are especially designed for mounting in the hull of the boat below the deck and usually on either side of the prow of the boat in such position that the rays from the lights will illuminate the surface of the water ahead and at the sides of the boat without causing objectionable reflections from the surface of the deck. These objects and advantages are more particularly set out in the said prior application.

The object achieved by the present invention is to simplify and improve upon the method of mounting the docking light in the hull of the boat. One of the difficulties experienced in mounting the lights in the hull of the boat is due to the fact that the hull of the boat is almost always curved, usually in both directions/at the points where the lights were most advantageously situated, which is well toward the prow of the boat and below the rub rail. In my former application the curvature in the hull of the boat was compensated for by the making of a wood adapter block which would be fitted to the inner curved surface of the hull and provided on its inner side with a flat surface against which the flange of the holder or frame would rest. The curvature on the outside of the hull was taken up by a flexible clamping plate or ring which was conformed to the curvatures of the hull by drawing up on bolts which secured the assembly to the hull.

While the method of my former application was satisfactory for the purpose, the matter of shaping the adapter block to the interior of the hull so as to flt the curvature of the inside of the hull presented practical difiiculties.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide for a new type of mounting which will makethe task of installing these docking lights easier, simpler, and more eflicient. The installation is always water tight and the direc- 'tions for installations are easy to follow with unusually satisfactory results.

Briefly stated the improvement consists in the employment of a cement block or base for the light which will not only readily adapt theassembly to the curvature of the boat and thus i'nake 2 the operations of installation much easier, but the completed job will be more satisfactory in other ways.

The drawings show the installation as finally completed and also an intermediate step which will illustrate the procedure which is followed. While the present disclosure represents the best known and preferred method of installing the new form of light mountings, it is subject to modifications and changes within the scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

In the drawings, in which the preferred embodiment of the invention is disclosed:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation looking at the prow of the coat showing the location of one of a pair of lights installed at a preferred location.

Fig. 2 is a cross-section through the installation as it is completed on the broken line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a side elevation partly in section taken in the location of Fig. 2, showing an intermediate step in the installation of a light.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged View taken on the line 2-4 of Fig. 1 looking at the installation from above and inside the hull.

In the drawings the numeral l indicates the hull of a boat equipped with the improved docking light. In equipping aboat with the light, the owner selects a location well toward the Drew and in a position so that the rays of light will illuminate the water as described in my. aforesaid application. At almost any point which may be selected, the hull of the boat has curvatures in both directions and the problem arises of fitting the light so that the installation will not only be neat and attractive but also will be water tight. In the installation of these lights in the manner set forth herein, it is desirable to select, if possible, a location where it will not be necessary to cut any of the ribs or battens on the interior of the hull.

In the form shown and desoribedherein the docking light as a whole is given the numeral 5. It is preferably oval in shape-with the lon axis of the oval extending fore-and-aft. Thelight is composed of a main frame 6 having a'vertical rim or wall I of a heightto extend wellinto an opening 4 cut in the hull and to the interior of the hull where it has an outwardlyextending peripheral flange 8 which is spaced from the inner surface of the hull. On the underside of'the flange 8 is an inwardly extending rib or lip 9, the purpose of which will appear.

Interiorly the frame is formed with a conical socket portion is, the axis of which is located at about 20 degrees to the plane of the frame so that the rays of light will be projected at the best angle to illuminate the water at the side of and head of the boat. At the base of the socket the frame is provided with a flanged portion I2, the inner surface of which is provided with a curved seat I4 to receive the spherical lamp housing indicated at 15. .The details of theinterior of the lamp housingare not important to the present invention and therefore have been omitted. The lamp housing is held in its adjusted position on the seat M by a clamp ring [8 which is held by bolts l9 passing into threaded sockets in'the flange I2. A gasket 20 in the space between the lamp housing and the clamp ring and flange l2 makes a water-tight joint at this point. v I

The rim 7 of the frame 6 projectsoutwardly of the hull for a short distance, as shown in Fig. 2, and around this projecting portion of the frame is placed the oval-rshaped clamping plate or ring 25, the inner. periphery of which fits closely around the projecting portion of the frame and the underside of which fits against the hull. v v

Because. thehull of the boat. is usually on a curve, both fore-and-aft and also in a vertical plane, a rigid. clamp plate would notfit against the outside of the hull but would leave large gaps. around thering which would not.0nly be unsightly but would makeit difiicult to have the hullwater-tight at this point. 'To compensate for this compound curvature, the ring 25 ismade Of a material which willallow itlto bend 'sufiiciently sothat when the docking light is completely 'installed,.,the innersurface of the ring willv conform to the curvature of theioutsideof the hull and bear tightly against it all around the light. The clamp ring is therefore made of a ductile metal ,or itmay be ,madeof aplastic material,

if desired. To increase the ductility of the ring, it may be hollowed out 'at intervals as shown at 26.

To holdthe frame and clamp ring in position, securing bolts 28 are passedatintervals through holes 21 in the flange 8, throughholesfil in the hull, and intothe clamp plate,.the heads of the boltsbearing against the outer surface of the clamp ring 25 and the.,nuts,29 against the inner surfacepf the flange 8. Ten of. these. bolts .28 are shown spaced at equal distances about the assembly.

Threaded inthe flange .8 and bearing against the innersurface of the hull are supplemental bolts known. aslegscrews, indicated by thefnumeral 30. Fourofthese leg-screws are distributed about the frame. Their function 'is tojact as spacing meansforholding the frame'in position while the. cement backing is put in place.

.In the completed installation, a foundation or backing of cement fills the space bounded by the flange 8, the rim 1, andtheinside of the-hull.

.This backing is indicated by the numeral 32. As

shown in Fig. 2 thebacking lieswithin the rib -9 ,on ,the fiange -8..and thisserves to hold the .cementblock in position, interlocking therewith so .thatfif theblock should crack pieces will not may be made "properly before the cement set 1 and hardens. Mixed with water, cements of this type acquire a putty-like consistency and may be formed, packed and shaped by hand.

The method of installing the light will now be described:

The purchaser of a light is furnished with a template which shows the outline of the opening 4. Using the template as a guide, he cuts the hole 4 in the hull of the correct size so that theframe 8 will fit thereinasaccurately and closely as possible. He then disassembles the light, removing all of the bolts and screws from the frame andremoving the clamp ring I8 and thelamp housing I5. He then places the frame 7 6 in reverse position in the hole 4, with the flange 8 onthe-outside of the hull, and uses the holes 27 as location marks for making the holes 3|.

I-Ie nowremoves-the frame 6 and inserts the leg screws3 0 to a depth as closely as possible approximating the distance which the flange 8 will be from the inner surface of the hull. He now passes the frame through the hull and reinserts it from the rear until the ends of the leg screws 30 come in contact with the inner surface of the hull,,so that therim 1 projects through the hole 4, a distanceapproximating the thickness of the clamp-ring '25 .v Due to the curvaure of the hull, the rim will not extendthrough equally at all points around the opening 4, but the maximum extension should exceed the thickness of the clamp irng onlysuifici'ently to compensate for the curvature ofthe hull. The leg screws will be adjusted to the correct distance at this time. 7 After these adjustments have been made and the frame is resting evenly onallfour leg screws, the frame is held firmly in place and the extending portion of the ring and the crack between the hull and the frame is filled with a seam compoundindicated bythe numeral 35. The back of the clamp-ring is then liberally coated with the seam compound and is placed in position around theextendingportion of the'rim.

The heads of the bolts 28 are likewise coated and the bolts are then inserted in position and the 'nuts 29 are applied to their inwardly projecting ends. The nutson the front center andrear center bolts 2B are drawn down with considerable force so that the clamp ring assumes'the fore-and-aft curvature of the hull, although it may not fit the hull closely at this time. The nuts on the other bolts are drawn down lightly.

The installation is nowin the condition shown in Fig. 3 and after making the final checks and adjustments to see that the elements are all properly located, the operator is ready to apply that the cracks and crevices on the outside of the hull are thoroughly caulked. The lamp housing maynow be mounted in place and the installationjis complete.

While the construction and procedure of .installation has been given in detail, these details maybe varied if desired. However, by' following the instructions a thoroughly satisfactory installation may be madeand the light will be completely water-tight and willmake a pleasing addition to the appearance of the boat. If the leg screws project too far into the interior of the boat the projecting heads may be out off, but ordinarily this is not necessary.

What is claimed is:

1. In combination with a curved boat hull having an opening therethrough, a docking light for installation in said opening, said light having a frame removably fitted within said opening and extending on either side of the hull, a flange on the inner side of the frame spaced from and overlying the hull, a cement base filling the space between the flange and the inside of the hull, a flexible clamp ring surrounding the outwardly projecting portion of the frame and bearing against the outside of the hull, and bolts extending from the flange through the hull and clamp ring conforming the clamp ring to the outer curvature of the hull and holding the frame in position on the hull.

2. In combination with a curved boat hull having an opening therethrough, a docking light for installation in said opening, said light having a frame removably fitted within said opening and extending on either side of the hull, a flange on the inner side of the frame spaced from and overlying the hull, spacing means to hold said flange at a fixed distance from the hull, a cement base filling the space between the flange and the inside of the hull, a flexible clamp ring surrounding the outwardly projecting portion of the frame and bearing against the outside of the hull, and bolts extending from the flange through the hull and clamp ring conforming the clamp ring to the outer curvature of the hull and holding the frame in position on the hull.

3. In combination with a curved boat hull having an opening therethrough, a docking light for installation in said opening, said light having a frame removably fitted Within said opening and extending on either side of the hull, a flange on the inner side of the frame spaced from, and

overlying the hull, set screws threaded through said flange and bearing on the hull to fix the distance between the flange and the inside of the hull, a cement base filling the space between the flange and the inside of the hull, a flexible clamp ring surrounding the outwardly projecting portion of the frame and bearing against the outside of the hull, and bolts extending from the flange through the hull and clamp ring conforming the clamp ring to the outer curvature of the hull and holding the frame in position on the hull.

4. In combination with a curved boat hull having an opening therethrough, a docking light for installation in said opening, said light having a clamp ring surrounding the outer edge of said opening, a frame removably fitted within said opening and clamp ring and extending inwardly beyond the inside of the hull, a flange on the inner side of the frame spaced from and overlying the hull, set screws threaded through said flange and bearing on the inside of the hull to space the flange therefrom, a cement base filling the space between the flange and hull, and bolts extending through the hull around the opening and clamping the flange to the ring.

JOHN F. MORSE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 243,780 J'ennings July 5, 1881 416,850 Nelson Dec. 10, 1889 1,053,995 Huff Feb. 25, 1913 1,125,824 Earnshaw Jan. 19, 1915 1,776,004 Luders Sept. 16, 1930 1,788,509 Everson Jan. 13, 1931 1,866,643 Greear July 12, 1932 2,239,900 Papp Apr. 29, 1941 2,257,038 Crossley Sept. 23, 1941

Patent Citations
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US416850 *Jun 15, 1889Dec 10, 1889 Wolfred nelson
US1053995 *May 17, 1910Feb 25, 1913Packard Motor Car CoTail-lamp for motor-vehicles.
US1125824 *Jun 29, 1914Jan 19, 1915Richard EarnshawAutomatic outlet-valve for ships' life-boats.
US1776004 *Jul 8, 1929Sep 16, 1930Luders AlfredShip's light
US1788509 *Jan 31, 1929Jan 13, 1931Everson Filter CompanySubmarine lighting fixture
US1866643 *Jan 14, 1932Jul 12, 1932Calvin B StallardBoat drain valve
US2239900 *Apr 15, 1938Apr 29, 1941G & W Electric Speciality CoCable connecting means
US2257038 *Jan 17, 1940Sep 23, 1941Crouse Hinds CoFloodlight unit
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2966579 *Mar 16, 1959Dec 27, 1960Comet IndBoat light
US4277818 *Dec 31, 1979Jul 7, 1981Dominion Auto Accessories LimitedCombined headlight, turn signal and parking lamp for snow plows and the like
US4360859 *Nov 6, 1980Nov 23, 1982Ziaylek Theodore JunBoat light having resiliently flexible and adjustable mount
US4445163 *Apr 26, 1982Apr 24, 1984Ziaylek Theodore JunBoat light, especially for transom mounting
US6637915Oct 18, 2001Oct 28, 2003James P. von WolskeNavigation light system and method
US7677772Mar 16, 2010James P. von WolskeNavigation light system using spatially separated partial arc navigation running lights
US8070333Sep 16, 2003Dec 6, 2011James P. von WolskeDocking light system including an accessory lamp
US8152334 *Oct 3, 2008Apr 10, 2012Lsi Industries, Inc.LED lighting assembly with adjustment means
US8567991 *Nov 1, 2012Oct 29, 2013Lsi Industries, Inc.LED inground light
US20020044449 *Oct 18, 2001Apr 18, 2002Von Wolske James P.Navigation light system and method
US20040062050 *Sep 16, 2003Apr 1, 2004Wolske James P. VonDocking light system including an accessory lamp
US20100061097 *Mar 11, 2010Lsi Industries, Inc.Led inground light
US20130077305 *Nov 1, 2012Mar 28, 2013Lsi Industries, Inc.Led inground light
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/477
International ClassificationB63B45/02, B63B45/00
Cooperative ClassificationB63B45/02
European ClassificationB63B45/02