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Publication numberUS2620230 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 2, 1952
Filing dateOct 4, 1947
Priority dateOct 4, 1947
Publication numberUS 2620230 A, US 2620230A, US-A-2620230, US2620230 A, US2620230A
InventorsJames M Hait
Original AssigneeFmc Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insecticide spreading machine
US 2620230 A
Images(6)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 2, 1952 M, T 2,620,230

INSECTICIDE SPREADING MACHINE Filed Oct. 4, 1947 6 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR M 9 #aJ ATTORNEY Dec. 2, 1952 J. M. HAIT INSECTICIDE SPREADING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 4, 1947 i? on INVENTOR. %A. m:

ATTORNEY Dec. 2, 1952 J. M. HAlT INSECTICIDE SPREADING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed 001;. 4, 1947 IN V EN TOR.

A TTORNEY J. M. HAIT INSECTICIDE SPREADING MACHINE Dec. 2, 1952 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Oct. 4, 1947 ATTORNEY Dec. 2, 1952 J. M. HAlT INSECTICIDE SPREADING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Oct. 4, 1947 INVENTOR ATTORNEY 1366- 1952 J. M. HAIT msrzcucm: SPREADING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Oct.

INVENTOR. M 9%. 7M

A TTORNE Y UH LI 2 Patented Dec. 2, 1952 INSECTICIDE SPREADING IHACHINE James M. Hait, San Jose, Calif., assignor to Food Machinery and Chemical Corporation, San Jose, Calif., a corporation of Delaware Application October 4, 1947, Serial No. 778,019

24 Claims. 1

This invention relates to an improved crop spraying and dusting machine of the general type in which a blast of air generated by a fan or propeller is directed radially from a circular discharge head toward the foliage to be sprayed.

In this type of machine it is customary to block off the lower portion of the discharge head opening by means of an arcuate baffle plate so as to prevent discharge of the air downwardly toward the ground immediately beneath the machine. It has been found, however, that this expedient, as heretofore employed, caused a reduction in the efficiency of the machine because the bafile causes a back pressure to be built up within the head, thereby not onl interfering with the free discharge of air over the open portion of the discharge head but also placing an undesirable load on the fan or propeller.

It is one of the objects of my invention to provide a spraying and dusting machine of the general type referred to with improved means for blocking off the air over the lower portion of the discharge head with a minimum of interference with the efficiency of the machine.

As a feature of this part of my invention I utilize means at the bottom of the discharge head for effecting a parting of the air blast with one part of the blast flowing in one direction toward one side of the machine and the other part flowing in the opposite direction to the other side of the machine. This is accomplished through the utilization of what I call a dividing surface preferably employed in conjunction with certain modifications in the discharge head hereinafter to be described. By the use of construction in conformity with my invention the air may be effectively blocked off over the lower portion of the discharge head while at the same time being allowed to fiow freely and effectively without interfering to any material extent with the efficiency of the machine, all as will be apparent hereinafter.

It is a further object of my invention to provide a spraying and dusting machine of the general type referred to with improved air flow directing means whereby the air discharged from one side of the discharge head may be directed effectively and efficiently in a direction upwardly or to the opposite of the machine.

It will be understood that in the operation of machines of the general type referred to the air is normally discharged entirely around the periphery of the discharge head, except for the blocked off lower portion above referred to, so that the air blast is simultaneously directed to both sides of the machine thereby enabling the spraying of two rows of trees at once. It is sometimes desirable, however, to confine the discharge to one side of the machine only, as where but a single row of trees is to be sprayed, and heretofore this has been accomplished by blocking off a suitable portion of the discharge head opening in a manner similar to that in which the lower portion of the head is blocked off. This has the same effect as the above described blocking off of the lower portion of the head and simply increases inefficiency of the machine.

By the use of my invention, however, this disadvantage is substantially overcome by the use of a suitable air guide which may take the form of a canvas or metal duct readily applied in overlying relation to one side of the discharge head for accepting that portion of the discharged air and moving it in the desired direction. As a more particular feature of this portion of the invention the air guide means may be mounted for ready movement so that it may be shifted from one side to the other of the discharge head whereby the air discharged from either side of the machine may be directed either upwardly or to the other side of the machine as desired.

As an even more particular feature of the invention, I may utilize an air guide or duct of a pliable material such as canvas and adapted for ready manipulation to the desired position or for collapse into a non-operative position.

I have thus outlined rather broadly the more important features of my invention in order that the detailed description thereof that follows may be better understood, and in order that my contribution to the art may be better appreciated. There are, of course, additional features of my invention that will be described hereinafter and which will form the subject of the claims appended hereto. It may also be pointed out that while I shall describe a particular construction of my invention, those skilled in the art will understand that the method of fabrication I suggest is not the only method that can be employed and that my invention is entirely independent of the method of fabrication or the materials utilized. Those skilled in the art will also appreciate that the conception on which my disclosure is based may readily be utilized as a basis for the designing of other structures for carrying out the several purposes of my invention.

Referring now to the drawings, Fig. 1 is an elevation of a machine of the general class-referred to, showing my invention embodied therein, but with the air guide. or duct at the side opposite 3 that appearing in the drawing. Fig. 2 is asection taken along lines 22 of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a section taken along lines 3-3 of 2. Fig. i is an exploded perspective view of the air tunnel and discharge head together with the air guide used therewith. Fig. 5 is a view similar to that of 2, but illustrating a modified form of air guide.

Fig. '1 is a section taken along lines 7-5 of Fig. 6. Fig. 8 is a section taken along lines 2-8 of Fig. 5. Fig. 9 is a section similar to Fig. 8, illustrating a modified form of the invention. Fig. 1G is a view similar to that of Figs. 2 and 5, but showing a modified form of the invention. Fig. 11 is a section taken along lines of Fig. 10. Fig. 12 illustrates a variation of the invention of Fig. 10.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, and especially to Fig. 1, the machine illustrated embodies a chassis [8 supported by wheels |2 equipped with tires l3 and adapted to be pulled through an orange grove, orchard, or the like by means of a hitch M attached to a tractor part l5. Mounted centrally of the chassis I is a tank adapted to contain spraying material. At the forward end of the machine, shown at the left side of Fig. 1, I mount an internal combustion engine l equipped with the usual accessories, and adapted to actuate a pump suitably connected to the tank H and spray-carrying pipes to be described hereinafter. The internal combustion engine I6 drives also, through a series of belts and pulleys, a shaft I8 that passes through a passage in the tank I to actuate a pulley l9. Pulley l9, through means of a series of belts 20 then actuates a pulley 2| shown in Fig. 3 as well as Fig. l. The pulley 2| is keyed to a shaft 22 that issupported at one end in a bearing ||b secured to the end of the tank Shaft 22 has secured theret a propeller 23 having a series of propeller blades 24, it being understood that-rotation of the shaft and the propeller will generate a'blast of air in a direction toward the left as viewed in Fig. 3.

Referring now to Fig. 4 as well as Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the propeller 23 is adapted for rotation within what I call-atunnel assembly T for developing an air blast that is adapted to pick up material from a series of spray pipes and to carry that material to fOIiage. This tunnel comprises a casting 25 having aseries of four legs 25a. through which the casting 25 may be securely bolted or otherwisesecured to the chassis ID, as is perhaps best illustrated in Fig. 1. Casting 25 is further formed with a bearing sleeve 21, and this bearing sleeve is adapted to carry ball bearings 28 and 29, best illustrated in Fig. 3, for supporting the shaft 22 on which is mounted propeller 23. The casting 25 includes as part thereof a ringlike deflector 26 formed substantially as an extension of the peripheral surface 230 of the hub of propeller 23. Thus, as is well shown in Fig. 3, the air flowing in the direction of the arrows A, under the influence of the propeller blades 24, will move over the propeller hub surface 23a and against the outwardly curved surface of the deflector 26. In this fashion, the air will be deflected radially of the machine toward the foliage to be sprayed.

Formed integrally with the casting 25, is the outer or confining surface 30 of the tunnel '1, illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4. This surface 30 confines the blast of air developed by the propeller blades 24 so as to generate a ring of air through 4 coaction with the deflector 26. For the particular purpose, a portion of the confining surface 30 is flared outwardly as illustrated at 3| for suitable cooperation with the deflector 26.

At that side of the propeller 23 opposite the deflector 25, there is mounted a dome-like member 32 forming a substantial extension of the surface 232 of the propeller hub. It is obvious that the member 32 will assist greatly in the smooth flow of air in the direction of the arrows A relatively to the propeller, and toward the deflector 26. The member 32 may be secured as by a bolt 33 in the position illustrated in Fig. 3, relatively to the shaft 22.

The confining surface 3|] is formed with an end flange 34 and secured to this end flange is a circular structural angular member 35 functioning as a reinforcing device. There is then secured to the reinforcing device 35 and the flange 34 a sheet metal intake guide 36 forming an effective part of the tunnel T and suitably curved to facilitate the movement of air into the tunnel under the influence of the propeller blades 24. A protective screen 37 is preferably secured to the intake guide 36 and prevents the entry of debris into the air tunnel, all as those skilled in the art will fully appreciate.

Heretofore it has been the practice to utilize a completely circular deflector'26 and a correspondingly completely circular portion 3| of the confining surface 30. In order to prevent the flow of air radially at the bottom of the machine, a plate is then placed across the exhaust space between flared surface 3| and the end of the deflector 26 to function as'has already been referred to at the beginning of this application. As a feature of my invention, I extend the lower portion of the deflector 23 downwardly to form opposed lobes 38 as best seen in Fig. 2. I further extend the sides of the deflector 26 downwardly as indicated by the dotted line 39 at the left side of Fig. 2, and by the solid line at the right side of Fig. 2, so as to effect a rather considerable enlargement of the lower portion of the deflector 25. The lobes 38 and the surfaces 39 referred to are well illustrated also in Fig. 4.

I similarly extend the downward portion of the part 3| of the confining surface 30 to form lobes similar to lobes 38 and designated by reference numeral 40 in Figs. 2 and 4. The casting 25 is then formed with what I term a dividing surface 4| formed as an inverted V, as best illustrated in Fig. 2, and extending longitudinally of the machine between the lobes 38 of the deflector 26 and the corresponding lobes 40 of the flared sur-- face 3| of confining surface 30. Preferably each of the two symmetrical halves of the dividing surface 4| is in the form of a volute or Archimedes spiral so as to direct the air with a minimum of resistance. It will now be appreciated that as the air blast strikes the deflector 26 it will be defiected radially in every angular sector thereof, except where the surface 4| is encountered. Since the dividing surface 4| is formed as an inverted V, it acts as a plow and serves to divide the air blast so that the air blast is well deflected towards both sides of the machine. Those skilled in'the art will appreciate that the dividing surface 4| in cooperation with the enlarged chambers formed by lobes 38, 49 will effectively and efficiently deflect the air so that it will move to join the air flowing freely and radially from the exhaust space between the deflector 26 and the flared surface 3 I.

For further assisting the dividing surface 4| inthe movement of the air, I preferably use a series of auxiliary vanes 42 in the enlarged lobe chambers as well illustrated in Fig. 4 and at the right side of Fig. 2. Thus, the vanes 42 lie above the surface 4| within each of the chambers formed by the lobes 38 and assist the dividing surface 4| in the functioning thereof, all as will be apparent. I also mount between the deflector 26 and the flared portion 3| of the confining surface 30 an auxiliary deflector 43 as shown in both Figs. 3 and 4. This auxiliary deflector may be held in place by bolts or by welding to brackets 44 extending between deflector 26 and confining surface 30. It is the function of the auxiliary deflector 43 to assist deflector 26 in imparting radial direction to the air.

' Spray material is supplied to the radially directed air blast by a series of pipe 5|! positioned transversely across the exhaust space between part 3| of confining surface 30 and the deflector 26. These spraycarrying pipes 50 are best illustrated in Figs. 1 and 3. In order not to complicate the illustration of the tunnel T in Fig. 1, the spray carrying pipes 56 at one side of the tunnel have been eliminated in Fig. 1, but actually, the pipes will be positioned at both sides of tunnel T in the manner well shown in Fig. 2 and will feed spraying material to the air blast asit issues from between the deflector 26 and confining surface 3|. Spray pipes 50 are carried by main supply pipes 5| extending to a further main supply pipe 5 la running from the pump all as is conventional in machines of the class described.

As was discussed earlier in this specification, it is one object of my invention to adapt amachine of the type described so that all of the air blast may be directed effectively and efficiently to but one side of the machine. I have found it is frequently important also that the upward portion of the air blast be augmented, as when it is necessary to spray high trees. I have conceived means for achieving the results of m invention that are very effective and extremely simple. Thus, I mount an air guide, preferably in the form of a duct, over an angular portion of the deflector system so as to overlie a part of the exhaust space between deflector 26 and part 3| of the confining surface 30.

As seen'in Fig. 4, this air guide may takethe form of a sheet metal duct D, to be secured with one of its sides 52 against the outer surface of the deflector 26 and the other of its sides 53 against a flange 54 extending outwardly from confining surface 30, as is well illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3. Each of the sides 52 and 53 of theduct D is formed with a series of slots 55 whereby through cap screws 56 it may be bolted to the deflector 26 and flange 54 while adapted for slight adjustment through means of the slots 55. It is to be observed that the radius of the duct at its lower end is such that it may telescope in snugly fitting relation over the outer end of the dividing surface 4| to a limited extent, and the slots 55 permit a certain amount of rotative adjustment of the duct so as to vary its direction of discharge without pulling it out of telescoping relation with the surface 4|.

It will be understood of course, that, if desired, the duct D may be secured to the other side of the deflector system instead of that shown, the particular side to which the duct is applied depending upon which side of the machine is to receive the augmented air blast resulting from the utilization of the duct. The duct may also 6 be removed from the machine altogether when it is desired to have the discharge directed to both sides of the .machine.

It will be noted that the duct D is illustrated as being in the general shape of a volute or.

Archimedes spiral so as to provide a path of gradually increasing area for the air which is.

radially discharged into it from the exhaust space between the deflector 26 and the surface 3|. Actually, the curvature of the duct is not a true volute or Archimedes spiral but is so formed that the cross sectional area of the duct at any point in its lengthis substantially equal to the total areaof that portion of the exhaust space which discharges into the duct ahead of such point- For example, the cross sectional area of the duct at A in Fig. 2 is preferably equal to the cross sectional area ofthe exhaust space over the zone A. Likewise the cross sectional area of the duct at B in Fig. 2 isequal to the cross sectional area of the exhaust space along the zone B. By reason of this proportioning between the cross sectional area of the duct D and the area of the.

exhaust space discharging into it, a minimum of back pressure is put on the air being discharged into the duct, and the air is turned and guided through the duct to its discharge opening without being obstructed sufficiently to create any significant amount of back pressure.

It may be observed that the narrower the duct D is made the greater its radii of curvature would have to be in order to maintain the proportions referred to above, and in order to maintain these proportions without causing the duct to project to an undesirable distance laterally of the vehicle, the width of the duct may be made as much greater thanthe width of the exhaust space as desired. This is accomplished in the construction illustrated in the sketch by extending the duct backward over the tunnel so as to obtain a greater width. In this manner the cross sectional area of the duct may be maintained by increasing its width, and thereby enabling its depth to be reduced. In fact, as will shortly be seen, it is feasible to thus enlarge the duct sufflciently toenable it to be of constant radius and still obtain satisfactory results while at the same time gaining the advantage of making it possible to rotate the duct from one side of the machine to the other without having to remove it from the machine.

Since, as pointed out above, the duct D is preferably wider than the exhaust space, means is provided for blocking off that portion of its lower open end which projects rearwardly from the exhaust space beneath the exterior of the tunnel T so as toprevent discharge of air out of the lower end of the duct. Such means may take the form of bailie plates 52a and 52b secured in any suitable manner to the exterior of the, tunnel and projecting radially outward therefrom. These plates are so positioned and are of such size and shape that when the duct is attached, either in the position shownin Fig. 2, or on the opposite side of the machine, one of the plates will fit into the rearwardly projecting portion of the duct and effectively block the discharge of air therefrom.

Referring now to Figs. 5, 6, 7 and 8, I show there a further modification of my invention utilizing a somewhat different form of air guide or duct. In the modification of Figs. 5 to 8 in elusive, the fabrication of the air tunnel corresponding to the air tunnel T of the first modi fication isscmewhat different, but the general arrangement and operation is, of 'course, v substantially the same. "As I have emphasized earlier in this specification, my invention is not to be'construed as limited in any way by' the fabrication thereof since different means 'may be utilized as mechanical operations andi processes change.

-I-n brief, the air tunnel of the'modification now to be described utilizes -a main'castingiifi, forming part ofthe outer confining surface of the air tunnel, this casting being securely mounted'onthe chassis'Gl by a series of brackets 62, 63,and 64. The maincasting 60 has formed as'part thereof a'central'hub portion 55 carrying a stub shaft 66 on which is rotatab-ly mounted the-propellerhub B'I'carrying a series of'p'ropeller blades '68. The propeller is rotated through a flexible coupling '69 actuated by-a shaft in turndriven bya flexible coupling ll actuated by a-shaft '12 driven by'apulley 13 through belts 14'. The left-hand end'of the shaft l2 is mounted by' 'ba-ll bearings "IS on a'sleeve' support'* 16 welded to-one end of-the tank of the machine. The belts'Ha're in turn driven by a pulley IT actuated' from a power shaft 78 through a flexible coupling 19, power shaft 78 corresponding to shaft l8 of the first modification. It is-thought that the'mounting of the propeller'and its actuation will now be ratherclear.

The air tunnel of Figs. -5-to 8- inclusive'has a deflector 80 that functions exactly as'does the deflector '26 of my first'modification. It has similarly acon'fi'ning-surface 8l that functions inexactly the same manner as does the part3l of-theconfining surface of 'thefirst modification. Actually,--the deflector 80 -a'rid the surface 81 are formed ofsheet metal spinnings-andare welded or otherwise secured-to the main casting S0. The'l'ower portionsofthe-sheet metal defiec'tOr'SU-and the confining surface 8| are elonga'ted-bythe-addition of -a U member 82 as best seen-in Fig. 6. In "the -U member a s'iurface 83 forms P lobes and chambers functioning the same as do the lobes 38 and the-"dividing surface 4| -of the'first -modificat'ion. It will be noted now that the functioning of the air tunnel 'of Figs. 5- to-8 is exactly-the sameas that of the first-modification, but that the fabrication thereof is somewhat different. Itis thought "u nnecessary to describe 'in' further detail the-air tunnel construction, as that construction will now be apparent from the description given and from the drawings presented.

Spraying material is suppliedto the-exhaust space betweendeflector Bll and surface ill-by three 'ba-nks of spray supply pipes 84. -Thus, an extreme upperbank of pipes 84 is mounted on-a main-pipe 8 5 extending--into-a-spray" pipe assembly 88 controlled by avalve 8 1; as 'iswell shown in Figflfi. At theright hand side of Fig; 5- there is a secondbank' of pipes" 84- supported by a main pipe 88' under'thecontrol-of a valve 89. The left handbank of spray supplying pi-pesBfl is carried by'apipe-QO-under the control of a valve 9I-. -It 'willbeunderstood that suitable piping is provided for conducting the'spray material from thepump H to the valves 81, 89 and 91.

The duct of the'modification of Figs.5' to 8 is designated generally by the reference letter D and has one side 92 extending inwardly into juxtap osed relation to the outer surface of the main casting 69 comprising the outer confining surface of the tunnel. The other side of the'duct D is designated by reference numeral 93 "and overlies the outer side of the deflector 80. Side 93 has'secured thereto at oneend abracket 94 and at the other enda bracket-95, the two brackets being'in turn secured to a central spider 96 as by riveting at 91. Central spider 96 is rotatable about the shaft 12 through ball bearings 98' best seen in Fig. 6, and carries a pulley 99 grooved for'an actuating cable I09. This actuating cable extends over suitable pulleys [0| to a remote point of the machine from which the cable may be moved-to rotate the central spider 96' and therefore the duct D.

It will be noted that the duct D is formed sothat-"it may be rotated to either side of the discharge head for coaction with the air'moving outwardly from the exhaust space between deflector 8G and confining surface-8|. It will further be noted that the duct overlies the spray supplying pipes 84 and that it does not, therefore, interfere with" the supply of spray material to the air blast. Of course, this spray supply maybe varied, and certain pipes completely out offby operation of the several valves"81,-89, and SH.

For facilitating-the rotation of the duct-D, the central spider 96 is preferably counterbalanced as by a weight I02, as is Well shown in Fig.- 5. It' will be appreciated that the duct D does not have the volute-like taper of the duct Def-the first modification. Therefore, parts-of the duct may be somewhat large for the volume of air accepted thereby'when the duct is placed in certain positions, but the duct is always of such adequate size that no hindering pressures will be established therein.

The duct D is preferably but not necessarily limited in its counter-clockwise movement in Fig.5 by slots I94 formed in the sides of the U member 82. Similarly, the clockwise movement ofthe duct-is limited by similar slots shown in the right hand side of Fig. 5. The slots 104, I05 serve also to facilitate angular adjustment of --the-du'ct D and to hold the duct in-an adjusted position. However, it is possible, 'if desired, to arrange the construction so that the duct -D" may move freely into a position at the bottom of the deflector system was to be completely out of the path of the air blast, and this is contemplated as a feature of-the invention.

-In Fig. 7' there is illustrated well the side 92 of-theduct D and the manner in which it overlies the-base casting BD-of the tunnel. Side 92 maybe provided with a'resilient gasket- 92a, as best illustrated in'Figi8, whereby to close' effectively the chamber 0 of'the duct through-which the-airbla st flows. i As in-the caseof the embodiment illustrated in Figs! 1- to 4 inclusive suitable radiallyextending' baffle p1ates'92b and 92c'are secured to opposite'sides'of the tunnel structure for reception into that portion of the lower end of theduct D which projects rearwardly of the exhaust 'space'whenthe duct is in operative position so as to effectively block off any discharge of air from the lower end of the duct. Attention is called to the fa'ctthat in this modification auxiliary defiector and' vanes are not shown'as in the first modification in order to simplify the drawings.

It will be recalled that the'duct D" of Fig. 5 is mounted for rotation'on the axis of shaft 12. If desired, the duct may be mounted as best illustrated in Fig.9. Thus, in'Fig. '9, the-duct is designated by reference-numeral I 06 and has a side- 101' equipped with a series of rolle'rs l08- cooperablewith a track I09 secured tothe other Fig. 11.

surface of the base casting 60. The other side of the duct is designated by reference numeral I II). It also carries a series of rollers I I I mounted for rotation on a track I I2 extending preferably from the tank of the machine. Through an arrangement of this sort, the duct I06 is readily rotatable into any desired position.

In Fig. 10 I illustrate a further modification in which the duct is designated by reference numeral H and is formed of canvas. At one end the duct H5 is equipped with a series of rings H6 supported by a bail II'I best illustrated in One end of the bail III carries a block IIB adapted to be mounted on a circular supporting wire I20 carried by the base casting 60 of the air tunnel. The other end of the bail I I! carries a block I2I similar to the block H8 and adapted for rotation on a support wire I22, suitably mounted on an integral part of the de- Naturally, the bail II! is slidable on the support wires I20, I22 and may be locked in any particular position by a nut I23 carried by the block I2 I. In this way, one end of the duct II5 may be held in any one of a number of positions relatively to the tunnel. The other end of the duct I I5 is similarly supported by a similar bail II! and is similarly adjustable. Between the two ends secured to the bails III, the duct I I 5 has rings I24 securing its sides to the support Wires I20, I22 as is clearly illustrated, Actually, the duct II5 will function in the same manner as the duct D' of the modification of Figs. 5 and 6. It may be collapsed readily so as to be out of the way, or may be moved into any desired position. Bafiie plates I24a and I24b similar to those indicated at 52a and 52b and 92b and 920 in the previously described modifications and serving the same purpose are indicated in Fig. 10.

Fig. 12 shows a variation of the modification of Figs. and 11 in which the canvas duct H5 is supported by a series of bails I25, each carrying a block I26 at each end thereof for mounting about the support wires I20, I22.

I believe that those skilled in the art will now appreciate the general arrangement of my invention and its functioning, and the rather considerable contribution I have made to this art.

I now claim:

1. In a machine of the class described having a rotating air impeller, a housing surrounding said impeller, said housing having a peripheral outlet opening extending throughout a major portion of its periphery, portions of said housing being shaped and disposed to confine and direct an air blast from said impeller radially of said housing through said outlet; an open sided air duct secured with its open side toward the space between corresponding angular portions of said confining and directing portions of said housing for receiving that portion of the air blast normally flowing between said angular portions, said duct curving to direct the portion of the air blast received thereby relatively to the remainder of the air blast, and means for feeding insecticide to said blast of air to be carried thereby to the foliage.

2. In a machine of the class described having a rotating air impeller, a housing surrounding said impeller, said housing having a peripheral outlet opening extending throughout a major portion of its periphery, portions of said housing being shaped and disposed to confine and direct an air blast from said impeller radially of said housing through said outlet; a curved air duct having an opening and secured with said by to the foliage.

3. In a machine of the class described having a rotating air impeller, a housing surrounding said impeller, said housing having a peripheral outlet opening extending throughout a major portion of its periphery, portions of said housing being shaped and disposed to confine and direct an air blast from said impeller radially of said housing through said outlet; an open sided air duct secured with its open side toward the space between corresponding angular portions of said confining and directing portions of said housing for receiving that portion of the air blast normally flowing between said angular portions for directing and facilitating the flow of said portion of the air blast tangentially and circumferentially toward the remainder of the air blast, said duct tapering in cross section in the direction of the flow of air therethrough whereby to define at each section thereof an opening for the flow of air equal at least to the angular space between said confining and directing portions subtended thereby, and means for feeding insecticide to said blast of air to be carried thereby to the foliage.

4. In a machine of the class described having a rotating air impeller, a housing surrounding said impeller, said housing having a peripheral outlet opening extending throughout a major portion of its periphery, portions of said housing being shaped and disposed to confine and direct an air blast from said impeller radially of said housing through said outlet; an open sided curved air duct having its open side facing the space between corresponding fractional angular portions of said confining and directing portions of said housing for receiving that portion of the air blast normally flowing between said fractional angular portions and directing the said portion of the air blast in conformance with the shape of said air duct, means for feeding insecticide material to said air blast, and means mounting said air duct for rotation into various angular positions relatively to said confining surface and defiector.

5. In a machine of the class described having a rotating airimpeller, a housing surrounding said impeller, said housing having a peripheral outlet opening extending throughout a major portion of its periphery, portions of said housing being shaped and disposed to confine and direct an air blast from said impeller radially of said housing through said outlet; an open sided curved air duct having its open side facing the space between corresponding angular portions of said confining and directing portions of said housing for receiving that portion of the air blast normally flowing between said angular portions, the closed side of said duct curving to direct the air received thereby circumferentially of the ring-like blast of air toward the remainder of the air blast flowing from between said confining and directing portions and substantially radially spaced from said confining and directing portions so as not to inhibit the flow of air, means mounting said air duct for rotation on the axis of said air impeller, and means for feeding an insecticide to said blast of air.

6. In a machine of the classdescribed havin a rotating air impeller, a housing surrounding said impeller, said'housing having a peripheral outlet opening extending'throughout a major portion of its periphery, portions of said housing being shaped and disposed to confine and direct an air blast from said impeller radially of said housing through said outlet; an open sided curved air duct having its open side facing the space between corresponding angular portions of said confining and directing portions of said housing for receiving that portion of the air blast normally flowing between said angular portions, the closed side of said duct curving to direct the air received thereby circumferentially of the ring-like blast of air toward the remainderof the air'blast flowing from between said confining and directing portions and substantially radially spaced from said confining and directing portions so as not to inhibit the flow of air, means-for feeding insecticide material to said air blast, means mounting said air duct for rotation on the axis of said air impeller, and means for rotating said air duct into various angular positions.

'7. In a machine of the class described having a rotating air impeller, a housing surrounding said impeller, said housing having a peripheral outlet opening extending throughout a major portion of its periphery, portions of said housing being shaped and disposed to confine and direct an air blast from said impeller radially of said housing through said outlet; a curved channel-like duct adapted for positioning in overlying relation to an angular sector of the-air blast flowing from between said confining and directing portions of said housing, and the edges of said duct coasting with the said confining and directing portions so that said air flowing through said angular sector will be guided by said duct.

8. In a machine of the class described, an air tunnel, an air propeller for developing a blast of air flowing outwardly of one end of said tunnel, a ring-like deflector positioned in the path of said air blast and curved outwardly-to deflect the air blast generally radially relatively to theaxis of rotation of said propeller, said air blast flowing then from the ring-like exhaust space between said one end of the tunnel and the outer end of the curved ring-like deflector, a curved duct havingan open side to overlie and enclose the ringlike exhaust space between the end of the tunnel and the outer end of the deflector corresponding in angular extent to the angular extent of the curved duct and forming a chamber into which the air flows from said exhaust space, said duct then receiving the air blast from the portion of the exhaust space it overlies and directing it in accordance with the shape of the duct, and means for feeding spray material to said blast of air.

.9. In a machine of the class described, an air tunnel, an air propeller for developing a blast of air flowing outwardly of one end of said tunnel, a ring-like deflector positioned in the path of said air blast and curved outwardly to deflect the air blast generally radially relatively to the axis of rotation of said prepeller, said air blast flowing then from the ring-like exhaust space between the said one end of the tunnel and the outer end of the curved ring-like deflector, spray carrying pipes positioned relatively to the ring-like exhaust space to feed spray material to said air blast, a curved duct having an open side to overlie and enclose the spray carrying pipes and the ring-like exhaust space between the end of the tunnel and the outer end of the deflector, said exhaust space corresponding in angular extent to the angular extent of the curved duct, and said curved duct forming a chamber into which the'air flows from said exhaust space to be directed by said duct in accordance with the shape of the duct.

10. In a machine of the class described; an air tunnel, an air propeller for developing a blast of air flowing outwardly of one end of said tunnel, a ring-like deflector positioned in the path of said air blast and curved'outwardly to deflect the air blast generally radially relatively to the axis of rotation of said propeller, said air blast flowing then from the ring-like exhaust space between the said one end of the tunnel and the outer end of the curved ring-like deflector. a curved duct having an openside to overlie and enclose the ring-like exhaust space between the end of the tunnel and the outer end of the deflector'corresponding in angular extent to the angular extent of the curved duct. and forming a chamber into which the air flows from. said lexhaust space, said duct then receiving the air from the portion of the exhaust space it overlies and directing it tangentially and circumferentially of said tunnel, the cross sectional area of said duct tapering from one end tothe other in the direction of the air flow therethorugh sothat at each section of the chamber iormed thereby there will be sufficient space for the free flow of the volume of air normally flowing from the angular extent of the exhaust space subtended at said section, and means for feeding spray material to said blast of air.

11. In a machine of the class described, an air tunnel, an .air propeller for developing a blast of air flowing outwardly of one end of said tunnel, aring-like deflector positioned in the path of said air blast and curved outwardly to deflect the air blast generally radially relatively to the axis of rotation of said propeller, said air blast flowing then from the ring-like exhaust space between the said one end of the tunnel and the outer end of the curved ring-like deflector, spray carrying pipes positioned transversely relatively to the ring-like exhaust space to feed spray material to said air blast, a curved duct having an open side to overlie and enclose thespray carrying pipes and the ring-litre exhaust space between the end of the tunnel and the outer end of the deflector corresponding in angular extent to the angular extent of the curved duct and forming a chamber into which the air flows from said exhaust space, said duct then receiving the air from the portion of the exhaust space it overlies and directing it tangentially and circumferentially of said tunnel, the cross sectional area of said duct tapering from one end to the other in the direction of the air flow therethroughso that at each section of the chamber formed thereby there will be sufficient space for the free flow of the volume of air normally flowing from the angular extent of the exhaust space subtended at said section.

12. In a machine of the class described, an air tunnel, an air propeller for developing a blast of air flowing outwardly of one end of said tunnel, a ring-like deflector positioned in the path of said air blast and curved outwardly to deflect the air blast generally radially relatively to the axis of rotation of said propeller, said air blast flowing then from the ring-like exhaust space between the said one end of the tunnel and the outer end of the curved ring-like deflector, a directional division line for said air flow atthe lowermost portion of the periphery of said tunnel when said tunnel is horizontal, a surface forming said division line by the closing of the exhaust space between the ends of said tunnel and deflector for a short distance at each side of the line of division, said surface curving downwardly at each side fromthe line of division in the form of an inverted V, and the end surfaces of the tunnel and deflector coacting therewith being correspondingly formed.

13. In the combination of claim 12, a duct having an open side for overlying an additional angular section of the exhaust space between the end of the tunnel and the deflector and forming a chamber into which the air flows from said exhaust space, and means for applying said duct to said tunnel and deflector with the duct overlying the exhaust space at one side of the division forming surface, said duct then receiving the air from the portion. of the exhaust space it overlies and directing it relatively to said tunnel.

14. In a machine of the class described, an air tunnel, an air propeller for developing a blast of air flowing outwardly of one end of said tunnel, a ring-like deflector positioned inthe path of said air blast and curved outwardly to deflect the air blast generally radially relatively to the axis of rotation of said propeller, said air blast flowing then from the ring-like exhaust space between the said one end of the tunnel and the outer end of the curved ring like deflector, a directional division line for said air flow at the lowermost portion of the periphery of said tunnel when said tunnel is horizontal, a surface forming said division lineby the closing of the exhaust space between the end of said tunnel and deflector for a short distance at each side of the line of division, said surface curving downwardly at each side from the line of division in the form of an inverted V and the surfaces of the tunnel and deflector coacting therewith being correspondingly formed, a curved duct having an open side to overlie and enclose the ring-like exhaust space between the end of the tunnel and the outer end of the deflector corresponding in angular extent to the angular extent of the curved duct and forming a chamber into which the air flows from said exhaust space it overlies and deflecting it tangentially and circumferentially of said tunnel, means mounting said duct for rotation on said tunnel, said duct being then movable from a position forming an extension of one side of the divisional surface or into a position forming an extension of the other side of said divisional surface, and means for feeding spray material to said air blast.

15. In a machine of the class described, an air tunnel, an air propeller for developing a blast of air flowing outwardly of one end of said tunnel, a ring-like deflector positioned in the path of said air blast and curved outwardly to deflect the air blast generally radially relatively to the axis of rotation of said propeller, said air blast flowing then from the ring-like exhaust space between the said one end of the tunnel and the outer end of the curved ring-like deflector, a directional division line for said air flow at the lowermost portion of the periphery of said tunnel'when said tunnel is horizontal, a surface forming said division line by the closing of the exhaust space between the ends of said tunnel and deflector for a short distance at each side of the line of division, a curved duct having an open side to overlie and enclose the ring-like exhaust space between the end of the tunnel and the outer end of the deflector corresponding in angular extent to the angular extent of the curved duct and forming a chamber into which the air flows from said exhaust space, said duct then receiving the air from the portion of the exhaust space it overlies and deflecting it tangentially and circumferentially of said tunnel, means mounting said duct for rotation on said tunnel, said duct being then movable from a position forming an extension of one side of the divisional surface or into a position forming an extension of the other side of said divisional surface, and means for feeding spray material to said air blast.

16. In a machine of the class described, an air tunnel, an air propeller for developing a blast of air flowing outwardly of one end of said tunnel. a ring-like deflector positioned in the path of said air blast and curved outwardly to deflect the air blast generally radially relatively to the axis of rotation of said propeller, said air blast flowing then from the ring-like exhaust space between the said one end of the tunnel and the outer end of the curved ring-like deflector, a curved duct having an outer peripheral surface and sides extending therefrom toward said tunnel and deflector, said sides forming with said tunnel and deflector a chamber in communication with the ring-like exhaust space between the end of the tunnel and the outer end of the deflector for a length corresponding in angular extent to the angular extent of the curved duct, said duct then receiving the air from the portion of the exhaust space it overlies and directing it circumferentially of said tunnel, means for rotating said duct into various angular positions relatively to said ring-like exhaust space, and means for feeding spray material to said blast of air.

17. In a machine of the class described, an air tunnel, an air propeller for developing a blast of air flowing outwardly of one end of said tunnel, a ring-like deflector positioned in the path of said air blast and curved outwardly to deflect the air blast generally radially relatively to the axis of rotation of said propeller, said air blast flowing then from the ring-like exhaust space between the said one end of the tunnel and the outer end of the curved ring-like deflector, a curved duct having an outer peripheral surface and sides extending therefrom toward said tunnel and deflector, said sides forming with said tunnel and deflector a chamber in communication with the ring-like exhaust space between the end of the tunnel and the outer end of the deflector for a length corresponding in angular extent to the angular extent of the curved duct, said duct then receiving the air from the portion of the exhaust space it overlies and directing it circumferentially of said tunnel, a track and roller connection between one of the sides of said duct and said tunnel, a similar track and roller connection between the other of the sides of said duct and said deflector, said duct rotating through said track and roller connections into various angular positions relatively to said ring-like exhaust space, and means for feeding spray material to said blast of air. l

18. In a machine of the class described, an air tunnel, an air propeller for developing a blast of air flowing outwardly of one end of said tunnel, a ring-like deflector positioned in the path of said air blast and curved outwardly to deflect the air blast generally radially relatively to the axis of rotation of said propeller, said air blast flowing then from the ring-like exhaust space between 115 the said one end of the tunnel and the outer end of the curved ring-like deflector, a duct formed of a pliable material and having an open side to overlie and-enclose the ring-like exhaust space between the end of the unnel and the outer end of the deflector corresponding in angular extent totheangular extent of the duct, frame means for maintaining said pliable material in position to function as a duct, means on said tunnel and .deflector for supporting said frame means and duct in various positions angularly spaced about the exhaust space, said duct then receiving the air blast from the portion of the exhaust space it overlies anddirecting it relatively to said tunnel, and means for feeding insecticide material to said air blast.

19. In a machine of the class described, an air tunnel, an air propeller for developing a blast of air flowing outwardly of one end of said tunnel,

axing-like deflector positioned in the path of said 1:,

airblast and curved outwardly to deflect the air blast generally radially relatively to the axis of rotation of said propeller, said air blast flowing then-from the ring-like exhaust space between thesaid' one end of the tunnel and the outer end of the-curved ring-like deflector, a duct formed of -a-pliable material and having an open side to overlie and enclose the ring-like exhaust space between the end of the tunnel and the outer end -of;the'deflector corresponding in angular extent togthe angular extent of the duct, frame means for maintaining said pliable material in position to function as a duct, means for supporting said frame means and duct in various positions angularly spaced about the exhaust space, said duct then receiving the air blast from the portion of the exhaust space it overlies and directing it relatively to said tunnel, and means for feeding insecticide. material to said air blast.

20.,jIn amachine of the class described, an air tunnel, an-air propeller for developing a blast of air flowing-outwardly of one end of said tunnel, a ring-like deflector positioned in the path of said air, blast and curved outwardly to deflect the air blastqgenerally radially relatively to the axi of rotation of said propeller, said air blast flowing thenfrom the ring-like exhaust space between 'the'said one end of the tunnel and the outer end ofthe ourvedring-like deflector, a directional division line for said air flow positioned at the lowermost portion of the periphery of said tunnel when said-tunnel is horizontal, a surface forming said-division line by extending between said tunnel'and deflector for a relatively short angular distanceat'each side of the line of division to close-theexhaust space for said distance, the surfacespf the tunnel and deflector at each side of thedivision-line forming a downwardly extending lobeat each side of the division line whereby said surface through extending between said lobes takes substantially the form of an inverted V.

21. In a machine of the class described, an .airytunnel, a propeller rotating in the longitudinal axis of said tunnel for generating a blast of. air moving axially of said air tunnel, deflector means positioned at the end of said air tunnel in the path of said blast of air for deflecting said blast of air relatively to its normal axial movement, an air duct, means mounting said air duct for rotation on said tunnel and for positioning in any one of a series of rotated positions in the path of aportion of the air blast moving relatively to said air tunnel as directed by said deflector means, said air duct receiving the air and directing the said air relatively to said air tunnel in accordance with the shape of said air guide, and means for feeding insecticide material to said air blast.

22. In a machine of the class described, an air tunnel, a propeller rotating in the longitudinal axis of said tunnel for generating a blast of air moving axially of said air tunnel, deflector means positioned at the end of said'air tunnel in the path of said blast of air fordefleeting said blast of air relatively to its normal axial movement, an air duct, meansmounting said air duct forrotation on said tunnel in the axis of said propeller and for positioning in any one of a series of rotated, positions in the path of a portion of the air blast moving relatively to said air tunnel as directed by'said deflector means, said air duct receiving the-air and directing the-said air relatively to said air tunnel in accordance with the shape of said air guide, and means-for feeding insecticide material to said air blast.

23. In a machine of the class described, a housing, a rotating fan mounted in said housing for generating a blast of air in said housing, port-ions of said housing being shaped and disposed to direct the air blast substantially radially from said housing toward foliage to be sprayed, means for introducing liquid spray material into the air blast, and air guide means comprising a generally volute shaped deflector positioned in the path of a segment of the radially directed air blast for re-directing said blast segment tangentially and circumferentially of said housing toward the remainder of said air blast.

24. In a machine of the class described, a housing, means for generating a blast of air in said housing, portions of said housing being shaped and disposed to direct the air blast substantially radially from said housing toward foliage to be sprayed, means for introducing spray material into the air blast, and air guide means comprising a generally volute-shaped deflector positioned in the path of a segment of the radially directed air blast for redirecting said blast segment tangentially and circumferentially of said housing toward the remainder'of said air blast.

JAMES M. HAIT.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the flle of this patent:

UNITED STATES, PATENTS Number Name Date 1,726,214 Comins Aug. 27, 1929 1,778,046 Strobell Oct. 14, 1930 1,864,198 Johnson June 21, 1932 2,258,731 Blumenthal Oct. 14, 1944 2,476,960 Daugherty July 26, 1949

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2713967 *Jun 11, 1952Jul 26, 1955Gen ElectricVentilating device
US2781057 *Mar 1, 1954Feb 12, 1957Power Jets Res & Dev LtdTurbine outlet ducting
US2840342 *Mar 17, 1953Jun 24, 1958Silvern David HTurbine exhaust
US2953295 *Oct 22, 1954Sep 20, 1960Stalker Edward ASupersonic compressor with axially transverse discharge
US3269657 *Jul 14, 1964Aug 30, 1966Diffusion De Tech Nouvelles EtSprayer assembly for the spray treatment of crops and the like
US3335943 *Feb 7, 1966Aug 15, 1967Sorrenti Sandy SCentrifugal blowers for agricultural sprayers
US3433403 *Dec 16, 1966Mar 18, 1969Lau Blower CoFan inlet shroud
US4019682 *May 14, 1975Apr 26, 1977Drake & Fletcher LimitedOrchard spraying machines
US5547128 *Jun 1, 1994Aug 20, 1996Jack M. Berry Inc.Sprayer
WO2003090527A1 *Apr 16, 2003Nov 6, 2003Estorachi Gomez Joan CarlesDeflector cone for agricultural fumigators and similar devices
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/78, 239/DIG.210, 415/211.2
International ClassificationA01M7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA01M7/0014, Y10S239/21
European ClassificationA01M7/00B2