Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2620519 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 9, 1952
Filing dateJul 23, 1949
Priority dateJul 23, 1949
Publication numberUS 2620519 A, US 2620519A, US-A-2620519, US2620519 A, US2620519A
InventorsEngelbach Miles V
Original AssigneeRuberoid Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Siding corner piece
US 2620519 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 9, 1952 M. v. ENGELBACH SIDING CORNER PIECE 2 SHEETS SI-IEET 1 Filed July 23, 1949 INVENTOR. All 5; Mfivmaawaz Dec. 9, 1952 M. v. ENGELBACH SIDING CORNER PIECE 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 Filed July 25, 1949 a v m 47 0 2 MM. m E w 7 w w W l i E .llll v. a m. w B y 1% z 2 z mm 2 l1! ll N .1 A w fi. r. IL II x f. q 4 d 4 JV 1 M Patented Dec. 9, 1952 Miles. .V.'.-E lng'el'bach;rChevy Chase; M di, assignor to The Ruberoid 00., New York, N. Y acorporation of New Jersey itpplication July 23, 1949;-Seri aINo' IOBEBB' 2 Claims.

1 This invention relates to asiding corner piece, and more particularly to units for finishing the 'cornersof sidings,-of the type-known as insulated sidings, formed of waterpr'oofed composition board faced to simulate brick, stone, brother masonry.

The principal object of the invention is to provide a self-fastening metallic corner piece that can be easily and quickly applied to the siding elements of each course without nailing, except the top and bottom units of the completed corner structure.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear from the following description thereof, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a siding corner piece or unit embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is a vertical section on the line 2--2 of Fig 1;

Fig. 3 is a similar section on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of a corner structure, partly broken, showing the corner units of this invention applied to the siding elements;

Fig. 5 is a vertical section, partly broken, on a larger scale taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 4; and,

Fig. 6 is a similar view taken on the line 6-6 of Fi 4.

With reference to the drawings, the numeral In indicates a metallic corner piece or unit having two wings II and I2 forming an angle of about 90 with each other, although the angle may be varied. The height of the unit is substantially the same as the width of 9. Siding element with which it is to be used, both measured vertically.

The corner piece herein illustrated and described is adapted particularly for use with siding elements of so-called shake design having a ship-lap along their upper longitudinal edges but none along the lower longitudinal edges. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that with slight modifications in structure, especially in the form of the bends of the upper and lower edges of the unit, the unit may be adapted for use with siding elements having ship-laps along both edges, or elements formed without shiplaps.

The upper edge of wing H is formed with an inward horizontal bend l3 and an upward vertical bend l. The lower edge of that unit is formed with an inward horizontal bend 15. The width of bend I3 is equal to the width of the horizontal portion of ship-lap 24 of siding unit 22, see Fig.

. 2 5, while the height oi bend 14 is the same or slightlyless than the height of the vertical portion'of the ship-lap. The width of bend 15 at the lower end of said wing is substantially the .same'as the thickness of a siding element.

The upper edge of wing I2 is formed with an inward horizontal bend IS, an upward vertical bend l1, and a second inward horizontal bend it, which bends are designed to engage and hookover the upper edge of an adjacent siding element 23, as will be hereinafter more fully described. The lower edge of the wing is formed with an inward horizontal bend I9, an upward vertical bend 20, and a second inward horizontal bend 2|. The bend 20 extends parallel to the wing I2 and is spaced inwardly a distance equal to the thickness of a siding element 23, see Fig. 6, so as to form a pocket in which the lower. edge portion of the siding element is received and fits. The bends l6, l1 and I8 are proportioned to fit the ship-lap 25 of siding element 23.

In forming a corner structure the siding elements 22 and 23 are nailed, as usual, to the side walls of the building to which they are applied, starting with lowermost or bottom course. The corner unit In of the first course is then applied with lower edge of siding element 23 inserted in the pocket at the lower end of wing 12 and with the bends of the upper edge of said wing engaged with the ship-lap 25 of the upper edge of said siding element. The bends of the upper and lower ends of wing l I are engaged with the upper and lower edge portions, including the ship-lap 24, of the siding element 22. The corner units of each succeeding course are applied in the same manner, that is, with the wings of each unit hooked over or engaging the upper and lower edges of the corresponding siding elements, without nailing or any extrinsic fastening means whatsoever. In this respect the corner units, as hereinbefore stated, are self-fastening in that they do not require nailing, except that the upper ends of the wings of the topmost corner unit, and the lower ends of the lowermost unit may be nailed or otherwise secured to the adjacent siding elements. On referring to Figs. 5 and 6 it will be seen that when the unit of each course is applied it will be engaged between the ship-lap upper edges 24 and 25, of siding elements 22 and 23, respectively, and the overlapping or overhanging lower edges of the siding elements of the next upper course, thus securely locking the corner units in place.

The outer or exposed surfaces of the wings II and I2 may be covered with a lightweight asphalt saturated felt faced with granules that match or harmonize with the color and design of the facing of the siding elements, which felt covering may be cemented to the unit. Such covering is known in the art and is not shown in the drawings. Instead of being covered with asphalt saturated felt, the face of the unit may have a facing of asphalt and granules, without a felt base, applied thereto, or it may be painted or otherwise coated.

It will be understood that the modifications in the construction herein illustrated and described may be made within the scope of the invention.

What I claim is:

1. A siding corner piece comprising a metallic unit having two wings disposed at an angle to each other, the upper edge of one wing having an inward horizontal bend and an upward vertical bend, the upper edge of the other wing having an inward horizontal bend, an upward vertical bend, and a second inward horizontal bend, the lower edge of the first-mentioned wing having an inward horizontal bend, and the lower edge of the second-mentioned wing having an inward horizontal bend, an upward vertical bend and a second inward horizontal bend, the bends at the upper and lower edges of the wings being ar- 4 ranged to engage with the upper and lower edges of the siding elements with which the units are to be used to form a corner structure so as to be held securely in place on said siding elements without nailing.

2. A corner piece for siding elements having a ship-lapped upper edge, comprising two metal wings forming substantially a right angle with each other, the upper edge of each wing having an inward horizontal bend and an upward vertical bend, the vertical bend of one of said wings terminating at its upper end in an inwardly extending horizontal flange, whereby said corner piece is self-supporting on the siding elements without nailing.

MILES V. ENGELBACH.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,258,080 Adams Mar. 5, 1918 2,110,258 Blank Mar. 8, 1938 2,126,676 Thomas Aug. 9, 1938

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1253080 *Aug 26, 1914Jan 8, 1918Emile Victor MorreauSandpapering-machine.
US2110258 *Aug 25, 1936Mar 8, 1938James E HookerRoofing cornerpiece
US2126676 *Jul 22, 1937Aug 9, 1938Thomas Frank SSiding
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2822763 *Jan 22, 1957Feb 11, 1958Berg Edward TReglet and counter-flashing
US2975227 *Sep 4, 1958Mar 14, 1961Gen ElectricMeans for enclosing electrical apparatus
US3895469 *Jul 9, 1973Jul 22, 1975Kapitan John RRoof and wall panel system
US5109641 *Feb 19, 1991May 5, 1992Peter HalanRoof transition flashing
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/276, 52/556, 52/541
International ClassificationE04F13/16
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/16
European ClassificationE04F13/16