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Publication numberUS2620826 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 9, 1952
Filing dateMay 19, 1949
Priority dateMar 24, 1949
Publication numberUS 2620826 A, US 2620826A, US-A-2620826, US2620826 A, US2620826A
InventorsOtto Johns Stuart
Original AssigneeOtto Johns Stuart
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flushing valve
US 2620826 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec, 9, 1952 s. o. JOHNS FLUSHING VALVE Filed May 19, 1949 .fiatented Dec. 9, 1952 FLUSHING VALVE Stuart Otto Johns, Parkville, Victoria, Australia Application May 19, 1949, Serial No. 94,097 In Australia March 24, 1949 Claims.

This invention relates to flushing valves for lavatories and like purposes and more particularly concerns that type of valve which includes a main control valve carrying a tiltable pilot valve and which is slidable within a valve chamber under the influence of the water pressure in such a manner as to permit a predetermined quantity'of water to be discharged whilst the valve is moving from its open to its closed positions.

Hitherto such types of valves have not proved to be entirely satisfactory due mainly to difficulty inensuring the delivery of the required quantity are frequently damaged when the washers are being replaced.

The primary object of the present invention is to provide an improved flushing valve of the kind indicated whereby the various parts thereof may be disassembled when required and easily reassembled if necessary, by relatively unskilled persons, without altering the volume of water delivered during each flush.

Another object is to provide an improved flushing valve of the kind indicated which is capable of being adjusted in a most simple and effective manner so as to ensure the discharge of the desired volume of water during each flush irrespective of the water pressure obtaining in any particular locality.

A further object is to provide an improved main control valve of unitary construction for use in flushing valves of the kind indicated which avoids the use of the usual plurality of separate sealing washers and is of such simple and inexpensive construction that it may be economically replaced when found necessary.

Other objects and various novel constructional features of the invention will be more readily apparent from the following description,

Referring to the drawings which form part of this specification:

Figure 1 is a sectional elevation of a unitary main control valve in accordance with the present invention.

Figure 2 is a side elevation looking at the left hand side of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a plan view of Figure 1.

Figure 4 is an inverted plan view of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is a sectional elevation of a flushing valve in accordance with the present invention, the main control valve being shown in its closed position.

Figure 6 is a fragmentary detail of some of the parts seen in Figure 5 showing the main control valve in its open position for flushing purposes.

Figure 7 is a cross section taken on the line VI l-Vll of Figure 5.

Figure 8 is a perspective view of the adjustable push rod seen in Figures 5 to 7.

As seen more clearly in Figure 5 of the drawings, the improved flushing valve includes a valve body 2 provided with inlet and outlet passages 3 and 4 respectively which may be arranged in substantially L-shaped formation as shown or they may be co-aligned as desired. The walls of both the inlet and outlet passages are preferably externally screw threaded as at 6 for detachable connection to ip n Located between the inlet and outlet passages is an annular seating l for a main control valve 8 which is preferably arranged with its axis substantially upright so that the valve may slide up and down within a valve chamber 9 as hereinafter described.

So that the main control valve may be readily accessible the valve chamber is preferably formed within a removable closure cap II which is provided with a depending flange l2 and an internal stepped shoulder forming two concentric valve guideways l3 and M of different diameters adapted to prevent tilting of the valve during its sliding movements. The depending flange is fitted with a sealing washer l6 and is preferably screw threaded as at ll to engage an upstanding screwed socket I8 on the valve body.

As seen in Figures 1 to 4 of the drawings, the main control valve 8, is of circular shape in plan and composed of synthetic polyvinyl-chloride or any other resilient material suitable for providing three sealing faces. One of these faces [9 is located on the bottom of the valve so as to engage the valve seating 1 While the second is located on the periphery of the valve body. In order that the latter sealing face may function in a manner similar to the well-known type of bucket or U-shaped seal, an open mouthed continuous channel 2| is formed in the peripheral edge portion of the valve body so as to extend upwardly from the bottom face thereof. An annular sealing skirt 22 is thus formed around the valve body which skirt is free at its lower end and connected at its upper end to the body portion of the valve.

The valve body is also provided with a stepped shoulder forming an upstanding neck portion 23 provided with an open topped recess 24 therein. The latter is provided with a substantially flat bottom forming the third sealing face or seating 25. The neck portion is adapted to be slidably accommodated within the upper guideway IS in the valve chamber whilst the sealing skirt 22 is adapted to be slidably accommodated within the lower guideway 14 In view of the resilient nature of the main control valve, suitable reinforcement thereof is desirable. As seen more clearly in Figure 1, an annular reinforcing member 26 which may be of angular cross section and composed of metal or any other suitable rigid material is preferably embedded in the body portion of the valve, during its formation. In addition a reinforcing band 2'! preferably encircles the neck portion of the valve. This reinforcing band may be composed of brass or any other suitable non-corrodable material and be adapted to form a sliding fit within the guideway I3 in the valve chamber.

A passage is provided in the neck portion 23 of the main control valve to establish communication between the two sections of the valve chamher. This passage may consist of an open topped recess 23a formed in the exterior of the neck portion so as to extend behind the reinforcing band 21 as seen in Figures and-6.

The main control valve is provided with an open ended pressure release passage 28 extending axially therethrough and this passage has a tiltable pilot valve 23 associated therewith. The latter is accommodated within the aforesaid recess 24 so as to engage the seating 25 therein. The pilot valve is provided with a depending stem 3! which may either be of a fixed length or-of telescopic formation. For example, the stem may be fitted with a sleeve 32 which is freely slidable lengthwise thereof, suitable stops or shoulders 33 being provided on both the stem and the sleeve so as to limit the downward movement of the latter.

The length of the fixed stem 3| or the sleeve 32 is predetermined in order to limit the lift of the main control valve and the resultant quantity of water to be discharged during each flush as hereinafter described.

As is well known, the main control valve 8 is normally held on its seating by the pressure in the inlet passage of the valve body and which is communicated to the valve chamber 9 by a by-pass passage. Hitherto, this by-pass passage has been formed through the main control valve orvalve body and has been fitted with an adjustable valve to take care of variations in the pressure and ensure the discharge of a substantially constant volume of water at each flush,

According to another feature of the present invention, non-adjustable means are provided for regulating the closing movement of the main control valve in such a manner that the initial part of such movement is effected more slowly than the concluding part whereby most of the predetermined volume of flushing water is discharged at substantially full bore rate of flow whilst the remainder is discharged at a more rapidly diminishing rate. Such .valve control means consists of primary and secondary by-pass passages 34 and 36 respectively which extend through the wall of the valve chamber whilst the primary bypass passage may also require to extend through the adjacent wall of the valve body as shown.

Both of these primary and secondary by-pass passages are open ended and devoid-of adjustable 4 valves. In addition they are spaced lengthwise of the valve chamber in such a manner that the primary by-pass passage 34 is constantly open but the secondary by-pass passage 36 is inoperative for the greater part of the closing movement of the main control valve and is not opened to the valve chamber until the lower part of the seating skirt 22 has passed downwardly beyond the secondary by-pass passage. As seen in Figure 5, even when the main valve is closed the secondary by-pass passage need not necessarily be entirely clear of the upper part of the sealing skirt for the reason that there is sufficient clearance between the upper edge portion of the skirt and the wall of the valve chamber to permit the passage of liquid under pressure through the secondary by-pass passage into the valve chamber.

Associated with the foregoing is manually operable means for tilting the pilot valve 29 when it is desired to release the main control valve from its seating. For this purpose a longitudinally slidable push rod or the like 31 is employed. This may pass through an open ended hole 38 formed in a lateral extension 39 of the valve body. This extension may be hollow to form a pocket 4| adapted to accommodate a seal around the push rod and a coil spring 42 which functions to hold the push rod in a retracted, inoperative position and may also serve to retain the seal in engagement with the rod. The latter may be operable by a universally movable handle 43 having a cam like inner end 44 engaging the adjacent end of the push rod. The handle may be retained in position by a screwed cap 46 removably connected to the lateral extension.

The inner end of the push rod 31 is adapted to strike the depending valve stem 3| or the sleeve 32 carried thereby, thus tilting the pilot valve and holding it open until the main control valve rises sufiiciently to enable the lower end of the stem or its sleeve to clear the push rod and permit the pilot valve to return to its seating. It will be appreciated that the extent of such upward movement of the main control valve determines the volume of water which is discharged prior to the control valve returning to its seating.

In those localities where the water pressure is greater than usual, the main control valve is forced down further onto its seating and consequently has to lift a correspondingly greater distance before the first pilot valve stem or its sleeve is freed from the push rod. The volume of water discharged during each flush, may for example, be upwards of one-half gallon greater than the predetermined amount fixed by the Water Board or other Authorities. Naturally the use of such excess water is wasteful. In order to avoid this objection, manually adjustable means are provided for varying the uplift of the main control valve that is necessary to free the lower end of the valve stem or the sleeve carried thereby from the push rod. The provision of such means enables a substantially constant volume of water to be discharged at each flush irrespective of the pressure in various localities.

For this purpose, the inner end portion 41 of the push rod is of variable radial thickness relative to the axis of the push rod. For example, such inner end portions may be of substantially cylindrical form of less diameter than that of the push rod and located eccentricall in relation to the axis thereof. The latter formation is seen more clearly in Figure 8 of the drawings from which it will be noted that appropriate turning and setting ofthe push rod Will vary the degree to which the main control valve must rise before the lower end of the valve stem or the sleeve carried thereby is freed from the eccentric end portion of the push rod.

Means are provided for slidably retaining the push rod in the desired operative position after it has been turned to the required setting. Such retaining means may consist of inter-engaging stop members on the valve body and the push rod. As seen in Figures 7 and 8 of the drawings, such stop members may consist of an enlarged head 48 on the outer end portion of the push rod and provided with a series of circumferentially arranged fiat faces 49 any one of which is adapted to slidably engage a complementary flat face on the valve body. The respective flat faces on the enlarged head may be identified by symbols located for example, on the outer end of the head. As indicated in Figure 7, the appropriate faces on the push rod may be marked (1) (2) (3) (4) indicating a pressure range of from to 40 lbs. per square inch which should cover the normal mains pressure.

Hitherto similar types of main control valves have been formed with fiat bottom surfaces with the result that when the valve is open, the water being discharged has a tendency to rise in the central passage 28 and temporarily unseat the pilot valve 29. This of course delays the closing of main valve and causes wastage of water.

Such a disadvantage is avoided by providing the main control valve 8 on the bottom with a depending annular lip 53 surrounding the passage 28 and provided with a concave outer face 54 which merges with the valve bottom. A depending lip of substantially the cross sectional form illustrated in the drawings, functions to deflect the water being discharged downwardly and thus prevents or at least minimizes the possibility of the pilot valve being unseated by the undesirable entry of water into the central passage 28.

In use, assuming that the main control valve 8 occupies its closed position on its seating l as in Figure 5, operation of the handle 43, moves the push rod 31 lengthwise against the influence of its spring 32 and tilts the pilot valve 29 off its seating. Water under pressure in the valve chamber 9 is thus permitted to escape through the pressure release passage 28 with the result that the water pressure beneath the valve lifts it upwardly until the lower end of the valve stem 3| or the sleeve 32 carried thereby clears the eccentric end portion 4! of the push rod and permits the pilot valve to return to its seating. It will be apparent that if the handle is held so as to retain the push rod in its operative or forward position, the sleeve will telescope on the valve stem without interfering with the closing movement of the main control valve.

Immediately the pilot valve returns to its seating 25 the water entering the valve chamber through the primary by-pass passage 34 commences to restore the pressure in the valve chamber and cause the main control valve to return towards its seating. The initial return movement is however relatively sloW and thus permits most of the predetermined volume of water for the flush to be discharged at substantially full bore rate of flow. However when the sealing skirt 22 of the main control valve passes the secondary by-pass passage 36 suiiiciently to permit it to supply additional water under pressure to the valve chamber, the continued downward movement of the main control valve is accelerated which provides a rapidly diminishing flow of water suitable for forming the necessary water seal for example, within a lavatory bowl. Undesirable friction and tilting of the main control valve is avoided in that the main volume of water being discharged is free to flow beneath the raised valve without at any time impinging against its side. In additioncushioning of the main control valve is also provided when the latter is closing so as to avoid undesirable water hammer.

It will be appreciated from the foregoing that the improved flushing valve enables the push rod to be initially adjusted to discharge the desired predetermined volume of water at each flush irrespective of the pressure obtaining in any particular locality. In addition the main control valve and pilot valve may be removed for maintenance purposes and subsequently replaced by relatively unskilled persons without necessitating adjustment of any parts which might vary the volume of water being discharged at each flush.

Furthermore the aforesaid unitary construction of the main control valve enables it to be readily and economically replaced when any of the sealing faces thereon become defective.

Instead of being of substantially cylindrical formation as aforesaid, the inner end portion 41 of the push rod may be provided with a plurality of angularly disposed fiat faces located at varying distances radially from the axis of the push rod.

Various other alterations, modifications and/or additions may be introduced into the foregoing construction and arrangement of parts without departing from the ambit of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

Having now described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Pat ent is:

1. For use in a flushing valve of the kind indi cated a unitary main control valve which is composed of synthetic resinous or other resilient material of sufficient elasticity to form a sealing face on the bottom of the valve to engage its seating, a continuous sealing face around the periphery of the valve so as to engage the wall of an associated valve chamber and a third sealing face in the form of a pilot valve seating located within an upstanding hollow neck on the top of the main control valve which is provided with an internal metal reinforcement, said upstanding hollow neck being fitted with a surrounding metal band which stiffens the neck portion and also provides a bearing surface for slidably engaging the adjacent side Wall of said valve chamber.

2. An improved flushing valve comprising a valve body having inlet and discharge passages and a valve chamber and seating located thereetween, a unitary main control valve having a pressure release passage therethrough and a tiltable pilot Valve associated therewith, said main control valve being [composed of synthetic resin or other resilient material so as to form a sealing face for its seating, a continuous sealing face around the periphery of the valve for slidably engaging the wall of said valve chamber and a third sealing face at/or adjacent to the top of the valve for said pilot valve, said main control valve comprising a continuous open mouthed channel extending upwardly from the bottom face thereof adjacent the peripheral edge portion of said valve, primary and secondary by-pass passages extending through the wall of said valve chamber between the latter and said inlet passage, both of said by-pass passages being open ended, devoid of adjustable valves and spaced lengthwise of said aeameac valve chamber so that the primary by-pass passage is constantly open but the secondary bypass passage is closed to the valve chamber for the greater part of the closing movement of said main control valve which functions to open the secondary by-pass passage as it nears its seating, said pilot valve having a depending valve stem adapted to be engaged and tilted by a longitudinally slidable push rod which is spring influenced and provided with an inner end portion of substantially cylindrical formation of less diameter than the push rod and located eccentrically in relation to the axis thereof and means for manually adjusting said push rod by partially turning and retaining it in any one of several operative positions without interfering with the-longitudinal' sliding movements thereof.

3. A flushing valve comprising, in combination, a valve body provided with inlet and discharge passages anda valve let and discharge passages, said valve chamber having two portions one of which is of smaller cross sectional area than the other; amain control valve made of a resilient material and mounted in said valve chamber, said main control valve having a first portion located in said other portion of said valve chamber and having a second portion of reduced cross-section with respect to said first portion, said second portion of said main control valve being mounted in said small portion of said valve chamber and having a reinforcing ring mounted thereon, said ring being of such a size that it slidingly engages the wall of said small portion of said valve chamber, said second portion of said main control valve being'formed with a recess located on the outer surface thereof and extending beneath and beyond said ring so as to provide a passage between said portions of said valve chamber; and'means for'actuating said main control valve so as to control the flow of Water through said valve body by movement of said main control valve in said valve chamber, said movement of said main control valve being guided by cooperation of said second portion of said main control valve with said small'portion of. saidvalve chamber.

4. A flushing valve comprising, in combination, a valve body provided with inlet and discharge passages and a valve. chamber connecting said inlet and discharge passages, said valve chamber having two portions one of which is of smaller cross sectional area than the other; a main control valve made of a resilient synthetic resin material and mounted in said valve chamber, said main control valve having a first portion located in said other portion of said valve chamber and having a second portion of reduced cross-section with respect to said first portion, said second portion of said main control valve being mounted in said small portion of said valve chamber and havchamber connecting said ining a reinforcing ring mounted thereon said ring being of such a size that it slidingly engages the wall of said small portion of said'valve chamber, said second portion of said main control valve being formed with a recess located on the outer surface thereof and extending beneath and beyond said ring so as to provide a passage between said portions of said valve chamber; and means for actuating said main control valve so as to control the flow of water through said valve body by movement of said main control valve in said valve chamber, said movement of said main control valve being guided by cooperation of said second portion of said main control valve with said small portion of said valve chamber.

5. A flushing valve comprising, in combination, a valve body provided with inlet and discharge passages and a valve chamber connecting said inlet and discharge passages, said valve chamber having two portions one of which is of smaller cross sectional area than the other; a main control valve made of a polyvinyl-chloride and mounted in said valve chamber, said main control valve having a first portion located in said other portion of said valve chamber and having a second portion of reduced cross-section with respect to said first portion, said second portion of said main control valve being mounted in said small portion of said valve chamber and havin a reinforcing ring mounted thereon, said ring being of such a size that it slidingly engages the wall of said small portion of said valve chamber, said second portion of said main control valve being formed with a recess located on the outer surface thereof and extending beneath and beyond said ring so as to provide a passage between said portions of said valve chamber; and means for actuating said main control valve so as to control the flow. of water through said valve body by movement of said main control valve in said valve chamber, said movement of said main control valve being guided by cooperation of said second portion of said main control valve with said small portion of said valve chamber.

STUART OTTO JOHNS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,021,224 Wilkinson Mar. 26, 1912 1,255,587 De Tamble Feb. 5, 1918 1,981,230 Glad Nov. 20, 1934 2,024,270 Binnall Dec. 17, 1935 2,038,135 Sloan Apr. 21, 1936 2,075,029 Duncan Mar. 30, 1937 2,172,855 Siege-rt Sept. 12, 1939 2,181,900 Langdon Dec, 5, 1939

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1021224 *Sep 22, 1911Mar 26, 1912Gen ElectricTurbine valve mechanism.
US1255587 *May 15, 1916Feb 5, 1918Frank SampsonFlushing-valve.
US1981230 *Nov 18, 1931Nov 20, 1934Morrison BrosValve
US2024270 *Apr 14, 1931Dec 17, 1935Tradewald CorpFlush valve
US2038135 *Feb 5, 1931Apr 21, 1936Sloan William EFlush valve
US2075029 *Mar 16, 1934Mar 30, 1937Duncan No Noise Valve & Bowl CFlush valve
US2172855 *Jan 18, 1937Sep 12, 1939Walter SiegertHigh pressure valve
US2181900 *Oct 6, 1936Dec 5, 1939Jesse D LangdonPiston and flush valve
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2738157 *Sep 25, 1952Mar 13, 1956Jackes Evans Mfg CompanyAmplifying member for pilot operated valves
US2738946 *Oct 31, 1952Mar 20, 1956Sloan Valve CoSelective dual flow flush valves
US2794614 *Sep 1, 1954Jun 4, 1957Langdon Jesse DCushioned valve and seat
US2994505 *Jul 17, 1958Aug 1, 1961Robertshaw Fulton Controls CoPilot operated valve member
US3406940 *Oct 4, 1965Oct 22, 1968Brooke WalkerTwo volume flush valve
US4134570 *Dec 9, 1976Jan 16, 1979Brooks WalkerTwo volume flush valve
US4621379 *Jan 7, 1985Nov 11, 1986Oy Wartsila AbFlushing operating means for vacuum toilet
US5232194 *Sep 21, 1992Aug 3, 1993Zurn Industries, Inc.For use in a flush valve
US5271600 *May 14, 1993Dec 21, 1993Zurn Industries, Inc.For use in a flush valve
US6189554 *Apr 27, 2000Feb 20, 2001Wilton J. PinoFlush relief valve having floatable sleeve member
US6227219 *Apr 27, 2000May 8, 2001Wilton J. PinoFlush relief valve having improved vacuum breaker
US7607635Aug 25, 2005Oct 27, 2009Sloan Valve CompanyFlush valve handle assembly providing dual mode operation
US8033522Aug 18, 2009Oct 11, 2011Sloan Valve CompanyFlush valve handle assembly providing dual mode operation
US8042787Feb 27, 2007Oct 25, 2011Sloan Valve CompanyDual flush activation
US8069877 *May 6, 2008Dec 6, 2011As Ip Holdco, LlcPressure compensating flush valve with self-cleaning piston
US8292257 *Nov 28, 2008Oct 23, 2012Jorge MaercovichMethod and arrangement for controlling flush water volume
US8397317Jun 5, 2008Mar 19, 2013Zurn Industries, LlcFlush actuator assembly and method therefor
US8585008May 27, 2010Nov 19, 2013Sloan Valve CompanyAdjustable flush system
US20100132103 *Nov 28, 2008Jun 3, 2010Jorge MaercovichMethod and arrangement for controlling flush water volume
US20120167990 *Mar 8, 2012Jul 5, 2012Jorge MaercovichMotorized automate/manual push button system
Classifications
U.S. Classification251/40, 4/324, 4/249
International ClassificationE03D3/04, E03D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationE03D3/04
European ClassificationE03D3/04