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Publication numberUS2621507 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 16, 1952
Filing dateDec 19, 1949
Priority dateDec 19, 1949
Publication numberUS 2621507 A, US 2621507A, US-A-2621507, US2621507 A, US2621507A
InventorsHarold J Fohl, John A Pharris, Vern T Touchett
Original AssigneePainter Corp E Z
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making a cylindrical liquid applicator
US 2621507 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1952 J. A. PHARRIS ETAL METHOD OF MAKING A CYLINDRICAL LIQUID APPLICATOR 2 SHEETS-SHEET 1 Filed Dec. 19, 1949 Dec. 16, 1952 J. A. PHARRIS ETAL METHOD OF MAKING A CYLINDRICAL LIQUID APPLICATOR Filed Dec. 19, 1949 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 Q0 5 4/ 12/ %J min j/ M4 w% w a wpwr /flMr w M% 0 6 J VWV a Patented Dec. 16, 1952 METHOD OF MAKING A CYLINDRICAL LIQUID APPLIGATOR John A. Pharris, Butler, Harold J. Fohl, Milwaukee, and Vern T. Touchett, Whitefish Bay, Wis., assignorsto E-Z Paintr Corporation, a. corporation of Wisconsin Application December 19, 1949, Serial No. 133,774

6 Claims. 1

This invention relates to a method of cementing a cylindrical member on a closely fitting core, and more particularly to a novel method of making a cylindrical liquid applicator.

One feature of the invention is that it provides an improved method whereby a flexible cylindrical member may be cemented on a closely fitting core.

Another feature of the invenion is that it provides a method whereby both ends of the core are firmly cemented to the cylindrical member despite the fact that the core fits closely in the bore of the cylindrical member.

A further feature of the invention is that the cylindrical member is slid partly over the core so that one end of the core is exposed, this end iscemented and the cylindrical member is then slid over the cemented portion of the core so that the other end of the core is exposed and this other end is cemented, and the cylindrical member is then slid back to the center of the core.

An additional feature of the invention is that the cylindrical member may be formed from a rectangular piece of lambs wool by sewing two opposite edges together with the leather side out, turning said member inside out and flattening the seam.

Another feature of the invention is that a good bond at the edges may be insured by clamping the ends of the member to the core.

Other features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following specification and from the drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective View of a paint applicator constructed in accordance with the invention and mounted on an operating handle;

Fig. 2 is a face View of the leather side of a rectangular piece of lambs wool from which the applicator may be formed;

Fig. 3 is an elevational view of said rectangular piece after it has been formed into a cylinder;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged view partly broken away showing the cylindrical member in the process of being turned inside out;

Fig. 5 is an elevational view of the cylinder after it has been turned inside out;

Fig. 6 is an elevational View, partly in section, of a jig and spacer upon which the applicator parts may be mounted;

Fig. 7 is an elevational view, partly in section, of the apparatus of Fig. 6, showing one of the applicator parts mounted thereon;

Fig. 8 is a side elevational view of the apparatus of Fig. '7 showing both of the applicatorparts thereon;

Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 8 but showing the parts in a different position;

Fig. 10 is a view similarto Fig. 9 but showing the parts in still a different position; and

Fig. 11 is a view similar to Fig. 10 showing the parts in yet a different position.

Cylindrical paint applicators of the type shown in Fig. 1 have been found to be superior to brushesfor applying paint in many instances. The structure comprises a cylindrical applicator designated generally at 29 rotatably mounted on an operating handle designated generally at 2|.

The handle 2| includes an enlarged gripping portion 2m, preferably of wood, and a rod member having a portion 2th extending outwardly from the gripping portion 21a. The rod portion first is bent at right angles to form a portion 210, then is reversely bent at right angles to form a portion 2! d parallel with the portion 2! b and is again bent at right angles to form a mounting portion Zle extending parallel with the portion 2 lo. A drum 22 is rotatably mounted upon the portion Zle, and the applicator 20 is frictionally mounted on this drum.

The applicator 23 comprises a cylindrical member having a soft liquid applying surface, this member preferably being formed of lambs wool mounted upon a hollow core.

In the past it has been the practice tocut a rectangular piece of lambs wool and glue the leather side of the rectangular piece onto the core member. Applicators constructed in this manner very often came apart at the seam, and the formation of a closely fit seam or juncture of the two edges of the rectangular piece of lambs wool was solely dependent upon the skill of the maker, so that the products were not uniform in this regard and many applicators were made with poor seams. This resulted in u even distribut on of paint on the surface of which it was applied.

We have devised and are herein disclosing and claiming a method of making a cylindrical liquid applicator resulting in a product in which the seam is uniform and which will not come apart at the seam despite continued use.

The first step in making a liquid applicator according to the novel method resides in cutting a rectangular piece of lambs wool from a larger piece, the rectangular piece being cut on the leather side with a sharp furrier's knife to avoid cutting through the wool strands. The rectangular piece when properly cut is shown in Fig. 2; the leather side 30 facing outwardly in said figure and the wool strands 3| not being cut ofi 3 even with the edges of the leather. If desired materials other than genuine lambs wool may be used, as for example certain synthetic materials on the market.

In the second step the rectangular piece of Fig. 2 is formed into a cylindrical member by joining two opposite longer edges together with the leather side out. The seam 32 is formed by sewing, preferably on a fur-type sewing machine. After sewing, the cover is turned inside out on a turning tool 33 having an outwardly turned serrated edge forming prongs 34. In this operation one end of the lambs wool cylinder first is turned in with the fingers fora short distance and the tool 33 is placed in thisinwardly turned end so that the outwardly turned prongs 34 grip the leather, and the. cylinder is then pulled down over the tool as shown in Fig, 4 so that the member is turned inside out from. the position of Fig. 3. The lambs wool cylinder with the wool side out is shown in.Fig.. 5. After the cover has been turned so that the wool. side is out the cover is placed. on a metal dowel and the seam is flattened with a hammer, aroller or a similar tool, so that when the applicator is rolled found that if. thecore or the inner surface of the'cover is entirely covered with glue or other cement and the cover is pulled down over the core, the glue will be wiped away from one end of the structure and a poor bond will be obtained between the core and the cover at this end, and in consequence of this in the past a rectangular piece of lambs wool (rather than a cylinder with a permanent seam) has been mounted on the core. However, our novel. method completely eliminates this disadvantage and results in a firm bond over the entire area where the cover contacts the core.

In making the applicator in accordance with our novel method we prefer to use the jigs shown in Figs. 6 and 7, although it will be understood that these jigs merely facilitate the operation and are not essential to the performance of the method. A jig 35 is provided on a base 36, this jig having a hole 3'! in its upper surface. This jig is longer that the core upon which the cover is to be mounted and has a diameter such that the hollow core will slide over the jig. A spacer 3% is provided, the wall of this spacer being about as thick as the wall of the core. Spacers of different lengths may be provided for making applicators of different lengths, and as seen in 6 the spacer fits closely over the jig 35.

Having formed the lambs wool cover into a cylinder with the lambs wool side out and the seam flattened, a spacer of the proper length is placed upon the ,iig 3-5 as shown in Fig. 6 and the core at upon which the cover is tobe mounted is placed upon the jig 35, the bottom of the core abutting the top of the spacer 8. A ccneshaped member Al is placed atop the jig 35, an extension Me on the base of the cone fitting into the hole 3'! to hold the cone in place. The flexible lambs wool cover is slid over the cone H and the 35 and is slid over the core 45 and the spacer 38 so that one end of the core isexposed as shown in Fig. 8.

W001 cover are removed from the jig and replaced thereon in inverted position as shown in Fig. 9. If thespacer L 8- comes on the jig with This exposed end is covered with cement'and the core 40 and lambs the cover it is replaced on the jig 35 before the core and cover are placed in the inverted position of Fig. 9.

From the position of Fig. 9 the cover is slid down over the cemented portion of the core and over the spacer so that the other end of the core is exposed as shown in Fig. 10. This end of the core is then covered with cement. The core and the lambs wool member are again removed from the jig and again replaced thereon in inverted position as shown in Fig. 11 and the cover is slid down to the center of the core.

The unit may then be removed from the jig and rubber bands or other clamps placed around the ends of the lambs wool cover to securely bind the ends to the core, inasmuch as looseness is most likely to occur at the ends.

While a satisfactory applicator cannot be constructed by gluing or cementing the entire surface of the core and sliding the lambs wool cover over the core because the glue at one end would be wiped off, by gluing only a portion of. the core at a time we are able to construct avery satisfactory applicator having a uniform permanent seam which cannot come apart, and in whichthe cover is firmly cemented to the core, particularly at the ends. After the cement has d'riedthe applicator may be mounted on the handle, the hollow core frictionally engaging the drum 22.

While we have shown and described certain embodiments of our invention, it is to be understood that it is capable of many modifications. Chang-es, therefore, in the construction and arrangement may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as disclosed in the appended claims.

We claim:

1. The method of cementing a cylindrical member on a closely fitting core, comprising: sliding said member partly over the core so that one end of the core is exposed: cement coating the exposed end of the core; sliding the mem ber over the coated portion of the core so that the other end of the core is exposed; cement coating the exposed end of the core; and sliding. the member back to the center of the core.

2. The method of cementing a flexible cylindrical member on a closely fitting core, comprising: sliding said member partly over the core so that one end of the core is exposed; cement coating the exposed end of the core; sliding the member over the coated portion of the core so that the other end of the core is exposed; cement coating the exposed end of the core; sliding the member back to the center of the core; and clamping the ends of said member to the core.

3. The method of making a cylindrical liquid applicator comprising a flexible cylindrical member mounted on a closely fitting hollow core, including: placing said core on a jig having a spacer thereon so that said core abuts said spacer; sliding said member in one direction over said core and spacer so that one end of the core isexposed; cement coating the exposed end of t e core; sliding the member in the other direction over the coated portion of the core so that the other end of the core isexposed; cement coating the ex'-- ber mounted on a closelyfitting hollow core, in-- eluding: placing said core on a jig having" a spacer thereon so that said core abuts said spacer; sliding said member over said core and spacer so that one end of the core is exposed; cement coating the exposed end of the core; removing said core and member from the jig and replacing them thereon in inverted position; sliding said member over the coated portion of the core and over the spacer so that the other end of the core is exposed; cement coating the exposed end of the core; and sliding the member back to the center of the core.

'5. The method of making a cylindrical liquid applicator comprising a flexible cylindrical member mounted on a closely fitting hollow core, including: providing a rectangular piece of flexible material having two opposite edges joined together; placing a cylindrical spacer on a. jig; placing said core on said jig abutting said spacer; sliding said piece over said core and spacer so that one end of the core is exposed; cement coating the exposed end of the core; removing said core and piece from the jig and replacing them thereon in inverted position; sliding said piece over the coated portion of the core and over the spacer so that the other end of the core is exposed; cement coating the exposed end of the core; sliding the piece backto the center of the core; and clamping the ends of said piece to the core.

6. The method of making a cylindrical liquid applicator comprising a flexible cylindrical member mounted on a closely fitting hollow core, including: providing a rectangular piece of flexible material having two opposite edges joined together; placing a cylindrical spacer on a jig; placing said core on said jig abutting said spacer; sliding said piece over said core and spacer so that one end of the core is exposed; cement coating the exposed end of the core; removing said core and piece from the jig and replacing them thereon in inverted position; sliding said piece over the coated portion of the core and over the spacer so that the other end of the core is exposed; cement coating the exposed end of the core; removing said core and piece from the jig and again replacing them thereon in inverted position; and sliidng the piece back to the center of the core.

JOHN A. PHARRIS.

HAROLD J. FOHL.

VERN T. TOUCHETT.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2944588 *Oct 20, 1955Jul 12, 1960Seamless Covers IncMethod of mounting fabric sleeves on hollow cores to form paint rollers
US3167356 *Jan 25, 1962Jan 26, 1965Crosby Frisian Fur CompanyMethod for making fur-covered brushes
US3181233 *Jun 6, 1961May 4, 1965Seamless Covers IncManufacture of paint rollers
US3275490 *Mar 5, 1963Sep 27, 1966Bestt Rollr IncMethod of making a paint roller cover
US3610693 *Dec 30, 1969Oct 5, 1971Xerox CorpMethod of making a cylindrical brush
US4100007 *Oct 15, 1976Jul 11, 1978E Z PaintrMethod of making paint roller cover
US4443282 *Apr 30, 1982Apr 17, 1984Stachitas Bruce LMethod of externally sealing sewage system joints against entry of ground water to the system
US5067217 *Dec 6, 1990Nov 26, 1991Scapa, Inc.Spiral shrink belt and a perforated roll
US5140750 *May 28, 1991Aug 25, 1992Scapa, Inc.Spiral shrink sleeve
Classifications
U.S. Classification69/21, 300/21, 15/235, 156/294, 492/29, 156/216, 492/13, 156/152, 156/423, 29/450
International ClassificationB05C17/02
Cooperative ClassificationB29C67/0018, B29L2031/328, B05C17/02, B29C63/346
European ClassificationB05C17/02, B29C63/34G