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Publication numberUS2623617 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 30, 1952
Filing dateDec 16, 1949
Priority dateDec 16, 1949
Publication numberUS 2623617 A, US 2623617A, US-A-2623617, US2623617 A, US2623617A
InventorsEricson George R, Snyder Carl J
Original AssigneeCarter Carburetor Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Half motor cutout
US 2623617 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 30, 1952 c. .1. SNYDER ETAL HALF MOTOR CUTOUT 2 SHEETSSHEET 1 Filed Dec. 16, 1949 [734 CLOSED WHEN CLOSED WHEN IN CLUTCH IS HIGH GEAR ENGAGED INVENTORS CARL J. SNYDER GEOR E RERICSON FlG.l.

ATTORNEY 1952 c. J. SNYDER ETAL HALF MOTOR CUTOUT Filed Dec. 16, 1949 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 IIII INVENTORS w CARL J. SNYDER GEORGE R.ERICSON ATTORNEY Patented Dec. 30, 1952 HALF MOTOR CUTOUT Carl J. Snyder and George R. Ericson, Kirkwood,

Mo., assignors to Carter Carburetor Corporation, St. Louis, Mo., a corporation of Delaware Application December 16, 1949, Serial N 0. 133,429

22 Claims. 1

This invention relates to internal combustion engines and consists particularly in means for increasing the efiiciency of such engines, principally by securin greater fuel economy during partial load operation.

ln conventional internal combustion engines, sufficient power is necessarily provided to permit satisfactory operation under maximum load conditions, such as during acceleration or while ascending grades. Much driving, however, is done under partial rather than maximum load conditions, and during such partial load periods, there is an excess of power available. Since the power produced is to some extent a function of the number of cylinders in operation, and since the amount of fuel consumed is also, to some extent, afunction of the number of cylinders operating, by operating only the number of cylinders commensurate to the power requirement, during these periods of operation in which power requirements are low the amount of fuel consumed can be proportionately reduced.

The object of this invention, accordingly, is to obtain'greater fuel economy in automobile engines, particularly by increasing their efficiency during periods of partial load, as while operating at low speeds on the level, or while descending V grades. We achieve this object by three operations.

First, the fuel is out off from one or more cylinders, or groups of cylinders under such light load conditions; as an example, when an 8-cylinder automobile is driven on a level road at speeds less than 40 miles per hour, a substantial fuel savin can be achieved by eliminating the supply-of fuel to four cylinders, and increasing the load on the remaining four.

There are numerous methods of cutting out the supply of fuel to one or more cylinder groups, but on engines having a separate manifold for each cylinder group, the problem is simplified by interrupting the supply of fuel to one manifold while continuing to supply the other. In this connection, it should be noted that it is not practica'l' to cut off the supply of fuel to one manifold merely by closing the throttle because the advantage-of transferring the load to the other group of cylinders would be outweighed by the increased pumpin loss resulting from closing of the throttle valve.

The second operation is designed to eliminate pumping loss in the cylinder group from which the fuel is cut off and consistsin opening the throttle valve leading to the group of cylinders during such times as theirfuel supply may be The third operation is to compensate for the cutting off the second group of cylinders by increasing the first throttle opening when the supply of fuel to the second group of cylinders is turned off.

Since the degree of throttle opening is proportional to the load, and since the manifold suction is an inverse function of the degree of throttle opening, we utilize manifold suction as the motivating force for cutting off the supply of fuel, for openin the throttle Valve leading to the group of cylinders from which the fuel supply has been cut off, and for increasing the other throttle opening.

Another object of the invention is to provide a combination of vacuum responsive and electromechanical means for turning on and off the supply of fuel to the secondary group of cylinders.

A further object of the invention is to provide means for shutting the fuel off at one value of suction and on at another, it being highly undesirable to have the valve turn on at the same suction at which it turns off, because the frequent opening and closing of the valve would cause too frequent acceleration of the engine.

A still further object of the invention is to provide means whereby the engine will operate on all eight cylinders whenever it is idling, whenever the choke valve is not fully opened, whenever the car is not in high gear, and whenever the clutch is disengaged. We achieve this object by arranging electrical circuit breakers for operation by the generator cut out relay, the choke valve shaft, the gear shift mechanism, and the clutch operatin mechanism.

. Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear by reading the specification in con'-' nection with the drawings in which:

vice;

Fig. 2 shows a fragmentary vertical section'and elevation of a different form of the device.

- Fig. 3 is a plan view of a cylinder internal combustion engine.

- Referring now to Fig. 1, a carburetor of the nal combustion engine l5, best shown in Fig. 3,

Fig. 1 shows a vertical section through the de-' conventional. eight"- II and I2, separated by wall 3 on which the cylinders are indicated by the consecutive numerals 1-8 inclusive. Series of venturis l8 and 19, respectively, are supported centrally of conduits II and I2 by ribs 20 and 2|.

Admission of air to conduits II and I2, respectively, is governed by split unbalanced choke valve '22, which is controlled by a conventional automatic choke control device 23.

Separate throttle valves 24 and 25 respectively control the discharge of fuel mixture from conduits ii and I2. Throttle valves 24 and 25 are mounted on separately rotatable shafts 26 and shaft 26 being journalled in the walls of mixture conduit H and shaft 21 being concentric with and journalled at one end in shaft 2s and at its other end in the outer wall of mixture conduit i2, Ihrottle 24 is adapted for pedal operation, a lever 28 being rigidly secured at one end to shaft 26 for rotation therewith. A piston rod connects the outer end of arm 28 with vacuum cylinder 3!, which is connected by a rod 32 to accelerator pedal 33, so that as accelerator pedal 53 is depressed, throttle 24 is moved toward open position.

A float controlled constant level fuel bowl 34 communicates respectively, with venturis I8 and i9 by means of metering orifices 35 and 36, passageways 31 and 38 and main nozzles 39 and 40. Additional restricted passageways H and 42, re spectively, connect fuel outlet passages 31 and 33 with idle ports M and d5. Flow of fuel through metering orifices 35 and 36 is controlled by stepped metering pins t6 and 41, respectively, which are connected by piston rods 48 and 49 to suction operated pistons 56 and 51, for operation therewith. Pistons B and 5! are slidably mounted in cylinders 53 and 5 5 which communicate with the mixture conduits posterior to the throttle. An accelerating pump piston 55 is slidably mounted in a pump cylinder 56 formed in fuel bowl 34. Accelerating pump 55 receives fuel from the fuel bowl 134 and discsharges it into the mixture conduits Ii and i2 by inlet and outlet valvesa-nd passageways (not shown) A countershaft 59 extending parallel to shafts 26 and 21 is journalled in the upper portion of the carburetor structure and is provided with arms 5! and 62, formed with extensions for engaging the nether side of the horizontal portion of piston rods 48 and @9 so that when countershaft 55 is turned the metering pins will be raised regardless of the suction acting on pistons 50 and 5|. At its opposite ends, countershaft 59 is provided with arms 53 and 64, arm 63 being connected by link 65 to a similar arm 65 on the outer end of throttle shaft 26 so that any rotary move-- ment of throttle 2c and shaft 26 is transmitted to countershaft 59.

A variable length link consisting of piston rod 68, piston 59, cylinder 10, and cylinder rod 7| connects the outer end of arm'fi l with the outer end of a similar arm E2 secured to the outer extremity of throttle shaft 2i. Coil spring it normally urges piston 69 upwardly to fully extend link 68li, which, when fully extended is the same length as link 66, so that the position of throttle 25 corresponds to that of throttle 24. is communicates with manifold I! through a suction inlet portv and associated passageways and connections which will be described later so that when suction is sufiiciently high to overcome the force of spring 13, piston 69 will be drawn downwardly, as shown in Fig. 1, thereby shortening link E8-l l. Under low suction conditions spring is urges piston 69 to itsv uppermost :pOSi-r Cylinder 4 tion thereby lengthening link 68'! 5. When link Bib-H is fully lengthened, as indicated above, its length is such that any rotary movement of countershaft 59 is transmitted via arm 63, link 68-li and arm 12 to secondary throttle shaft 23'. When, due to the action of suction on piston 69, link 68-H is shortened, as described above, secondary throttle 25 is held at its fully open position, as shown in Fig. 1, regardless of the position of primary throttle valve 2t.

For the purpose of stopping the flow of fuel through nozzle 40 into secondary mixture conduit l2 during predetermined high suction conditions a suction operated poppet valve '55 is provided in passageway 38. Valve '55 is formed with an elongated fluted stem portion i6 slidably mounted for sealingly seating in a tubular casing H, which is sealingly fitted into fuel passageway 38. Openings M are formed in cylindrical casing I! adja cent metering orifice 35 to permit the flow of fuel into casing Ti. A coil sprin 78, on stem it is compressed between the lower end of casin and a shoulder 19 on stem H3, thus normally urging poppet valve 15 into its seated position against the upper end of cylindrical casing H. The lower end of stem 16 projects into cavity 8 which is sealingly covered by resilient diaphragm etc to form a pumping chamber. Cup 8! is sealingly secured to and cooperates with diaphragm Etc to form a suction chamber 82. Diaphragm 68a is provided with a central button 83 on its upper surface to contact the end of valve stem 16, and a central cup-shaped spring seat 84 on its lower surface. Coil spring 85, seated in chamber 82 normally urges diaphragm 89a towards the base of stem 76, thereby raising valve 15 from its seat, to permit the passage of fuel from fuel bowl as into mixture conduit 92.

Suction chamber 82, is connected with intake manifold l! through suction inlet port 85 and associated passage and valve means which will be described in detail below, so that when the valve means are opened to permit free communication, diaphragm 890. will be drawn down-. wardly against spring 85, spring E3 will urge stem the fuel contained in pumping chamber 85 into mixture conduit 12, so as to sufficiently wet the manifold which, of course, dries out when valve 15 is closed. It should be noted that diaphragm Bea, when withdrawn by vacuum, does not suck any air through nozzle 40, since valve 75 is closed before complete withdrawal of diaphragm 89a. In order that the primary throttle 24 may be automatically openedan additional amount to compensate for the shutting off of fuel to the sec-- ondary bank of cylinders, a suction powered device comprising cylinder 3| and piston 90 slid-. ably mounted therein is interposed in the link 3032 between throttleshaft arm 28 and accelerator pedal 33, piston 90 being secured to piston rod 30, and cylinder 31 being secured to rod 32. A spring 9| normally urges piston 90 towards its uppermost position in cylinder 3|.

However, when suction is applied to piston through suction inlet,.92, piston 90 is drawn downward, thereby shortening link 30-32,- and to elevate closure member 98, so that causing primary throttle 24 to open a slight additional amount.

Communication between intake manifold I1 and suction cylinders 3I and 10 and suction chamber 82 is regulated by solenoid valve 94 which is adapted, in a manner to be described below, to permit communication of manifold Vacuum to cylinders 3! and 10 and suction chamber 92 when manifold vacuum increases above a predetermined value, such as 11 inches Hg; and to vent cylinders 3| and 10, and suction chamber 92 .to the atmosphere when manifold vacuum decreases below a different predetermined value,-such as 5-inches Hg. Valve 94 consists of a tubular housing, having suction inlet port 95, vents 96 communicating with the atmosphere, and outlet port 91. A cylindrical closure member 98, formed with an annular groove 99 and a stem MI is slidably mounted in the housing. Closure member 99 normally remains in its lowermost position due to the action of gravity, so that annular groove 99 provides free communication between outlet port 91, and atmospheric vents 96. A solenoid I02 is provided fully raised, annular groove 99 provides communication between suction inlet port 95 and outletport 91. I

Hose I01 connects outlet port 91 with suction inlet port 92 on cylinder 3I; hose I08 connects outlet port 91 with inlet port 86 on diaphragm suction chamber 82. A third hose I09 connects outlet port 91 with a one-way retarding valve N2, the outlet H3 of which communicates with reservoir H5 and with suction cylinder 10 by means of flexible connection II6. An additional tubular connection II1 provides communication between primary intake manifold I1 and inlet port 95 of valve 94, so that when closure member 98 is in its uppermost position manifold suction is communicated to cylinder 3| and suction chamber 82, respectively, by flexible tubes I01, and I08, and to cylinder 10 by flexible tube I09, one-way retarding valve H2, and flexible connection IIB.

In order to retard the rate of opening of secondary throttle 25, and thereby prevent objectionable backfiring when it is opened, and yet to permit instantaneous closing, a one-way retarding valve H2 is provided. One-way retarding valve II2 contains a one-way, disk type check valve I20, normally urged against its seat I2I by light coil spring I22. Passageway I23, formed with restricted orifice I24 by-passes valve I20, and provides restricted communication through one-way retarding valve II2. A screw I26 is provided for manually varying the effective area of restricted orifice I24. The purpose of one-way retarding valve II 2 is achieved by reducing the rate of evacuation of cylinder 10,

since due to the action of spring I22 on disk I20,

evacuation must be accomplished through restricted orifice I24 thereby reducing the rate at which secondary throttle 25 is moved toward its fully opened position; rate of movement of piston 69 is further decreased due to the necessity of evacuating reservoir II5 as well as cylinder 10 before piston 69 can be drawn to its lowermost position. When manifold suction is re-' duced, and hose I09 is vented to the atmosphere through valve 94, the differential in pressure is sufiicient to lift disk I from its seat, so that the full increased pressure is transmitted instantaneouslyto cylinder 10, thereby urging piswhen 65 ton 69 upwardly'to lengthen link 68-1I, and thus returning throttle to pedal control.

For controlling the operation of solenoid I02 of valve 94, a suction operated electrical contact mechanism I29 is provided. Contact mechanism I29 consists of an upstanding frame I31 formed with a flange I32 at its base for attachment to a plate I34 which also serves as a base for valve 94, and as a bottom stop for valve closure member 98. A circular opening I35 is formed in frame I3I to permit free movement of yieldable diaphragm I36, which is sealingly' secured against frame I3I by cup I38, the hollow interior of which serves as a suction chamber I39. Suction chamber I39 communicates with primary intake manifold I1 through tubes I40 and II1. A button I43 is centrally secured to diaphragm I36 by means of cup shaped clamping member I45 which also serves as a seat for coil spring I41. Normally diaphragm I36 is urged outwardly by coil spring I41 in opposition to manifold vacuum in suction chamber I39. A termlnal'block I48 is mounted in frame vI3I and is insulated therefrom by a dielectric material. Screws I49 and I50 are secured in block I48 and serve as contact points. A resilient metal strip I52 is secured to frame I3I by terminal screw and nut I 53, terminal I53 and strip I 52 being electrically insulated from frame I3I by insulating sleeve I54, and is formed with a contact point I55 on its free end, which is normally urged against an extremity of screw I49. A contact arm I 56 is hingedly secured to frame I3I near its base, and at its upper end has a pad I59 of insulating material adapted to register with the free extremity of strip I52, and a contact point adapted to register with the outer end of screw I50; arm I56 is also formed with a projection I60 adapted to register with diaphragm button I43, so that under low suction conditions spring I41 urges arm I56 away from screw I50 and against strip I52, thus breaking the contact between contact point I55 and screw I49. Terminal bracket I63 extends outwardly from frame I3I and carries terminal I64 at its outer end. A

coil spring I65, mounted on bracket I63 urges arm I56 away from strip I52 and toward screw I50, in opposition to spring I41, so that when manifold suction in chamber l39 increases to a predetermined low value, such as 5 inches Hg, contact I55 is free to abut against screw I49, and when manifold suction increases to a higher value, 11 inches Hg for example, arm I56 makes contact with screw I50.

Electrical energy for the operation of solenoid valve 94 is provided by a storage battery indicated at I69, and isconducted to solenoid I92 through a circuitincludin a conductor I19, manual switch I1I, gearshift operated switch I12, clutch operated switch I13, choke operated switch I14, suction operated switch I29, generator cutout relay switch I15, and grounds I16 and I16a.

Gear shift switch I12 is operatively connected to the gear shift mechanism by a linkage means I19, so that it is closed only when the automobile. is in high gear, and is open at all other times, since, normally, load conditions at other times require eight cylinder operation. Clutch switch I13 is operatively connected to the clutch operating mechanism by a linkage means I19, so that it is closed only when the clutch is engaged, and open at all other times; the function of switch I13 is to assist in a smooth transition from eight cylinder operation in second gear to four cylinder operation in high gear; that is, to prevent a 7.. momentary change to four cylinder "operation while the clutch is disengaged for shifting, and a sudden return to eight cylinder operation on reengagement of the clutch. Choke operated switch I14 is operatively connected to the choke operating mechanism 23, so that it closes only when choke valve 22 is fully opened; at all other times switch H4 remains opened, so that solenoid I02 cannot be energized and'the engine must operate on all eight cylinders until it is fully warmed up. Switch Ill: is operated by the gener= ator cut-out relay I'I5a so that when the engine is operating at a low speed, such as during idling, switch H is opened, solenoid M2 is thus deenergized and the engine operates on all eight cylinders at such low speeds. Circuit Ill! is connected to switch apparatus I29 at terminals I54 and I'll and to the solenoid winding I02 at terminals HQ and H32, so that when switches Ill, I12, I13, I14, and I are closed and manifold vacuum in suction chamber !39 is sufiiciently high to permit spring iii-5 to urge arm I56 into contact with contact screw I56 the circuit is cornpleted through switch mechanism I29 via terminal I54, bracket spring 65, contact arm I56, contact screw Lit, terminal block M8, and terminal I49, and solenoid I52 is energized, thereby lifting closure member 98.

A'shun't circuit I85 including switches I8I and I55-'-'I49 by-passes switch IElS-I 59 under certain conditions, which will be described in detail below. Switch IBI consists of two resilient contact strips I83 and I84 secured to non-conducting terminal block I85, which is secured to solenoid coil I82 and is so positioned with respect thereto that 5 upward movement of valve plunger stern lIII forces contact strip I34 upward and into engagement with contact strip I83, therefore completing shunt or holdin circuit l80, so that when manifold vacuum decreases below I inches Hg, and contact l5t-i5fi opens, solenoid I02 will remain energized, receiving its energy through holdingcircuit I88, which remains closed until manifold vacuum decreases to 5 inches Hg-at which'point arm I56 urges point I55 out of contact with contact screw I 49.

Operation of the device of Fig. 1 is as follows:

When the driver shifts into high gear, switch H2 on the gearshift linkage closes, and when the clutch-is let out, clutch switch I73 closes, thereby, completing the circuit as far as vacuum operated switch I29. At this time, and until an increase in suction, the engine is operating on eight cylinders, throttle control being entirely manual. When manifold suction reaches approximately 5 inches Hg, pivoted arm 55 is urged inwardly by spring I65, permitting contact I55I49 to close. When manifold vacuum reaches approximately 11. "inche'sHg, arm I55 is moved inwardly sufficiently. far tomake contact with contact screw I50, thereby closing a circuit through solenoid I02. This raises plunger 88, thereby closing by- Dassswitch I8I, and connecting solenoid valve inlet-port 95 with outlet port 91, Snatcher pump suction chamber 82, auxiliary throttle cylinder wand primary throttle cylinder 3| are thus simultaneously evacuated, so that primary throttle 24 is opened an additional amount, secondary throttle is opened completely, and the snatcher pump valve 15 is closed. It should be noted,in connection with primary throttle cylinder 3 I, that its spring 9! is slightly stronger than spring I41, so that a greater value of suction will be required toincrease the opening of throttle 24 than was required .to close contacts -l- I49, to avoid sudden, or instantaneous decreases iii-manifold vacuum, which would cause opening of these switches and consequent inoperativeness of the entire cut-ofi system. The engine thus operates on the primary bank of cylinders, even though manifold suction decreases below 11 inches Hg at which point contact Hit-456 is opened, since contact I5Il-l56 is by-passed by shunt circuit lBil. However, when manifold suction declines below 5 inches Hg, contact I49I55 is opened, thereby breaking the shunt circuit I93, and permitting plunger 98 to drop by its own weight to vent outlet port 5? to the atmosphere by means of radial vent ports 9%. When this occurs the springs in primary throttle cylinder 3! and secondary throttle cylinder It urge the pistons into the extended position, and the spring in snatcher pump suction chamber forces its diaphragm and valve into the open position, and causes a fuel discharge into secondary mixture conduit I2. The primary throttle is thus returned to its normal eight-cylinder operating position, and the auxiliary throttle is also returned to its normal eight-cylinder position for manual control in unison with the primary throttle.

Figure 2 illustrates another form of suction operated switch and solenoid valve. Valve I85 consists of a tubular casing IBBa closed at each end, formed with suction inlet port I81, atmospheric vent port I88, and suction outlet port I89. A cylindrical closure member I99, formed with an elongated annular groove I9 I, is slidably and sealingly mounted in tubular casing IBSa. The length of annular groove IQI is such that when closure member I is in one extreme position, as shown in Figure 2, outlet port I89 is in communication with vent port I88, and when closure member is in the other extreme position, outlet port I89 is in communication with suction inlet port I81; the length of groove I9I being substantially less than the distance between suction inlet port I81, and vent port I88, the two ports are never in communication with each other. At the end of tubular casing IBfia, solenoids I93 and I94, are mounted so that when solenoid I93 is energized, closure member I9ii is drawn in to it, and groove IQI offers free communication between the suction inlet and outlet ports I81 and I89 respectively. When solenoid I94 is energized closure member I90 is drawn toward the opposite end of casing Iiifia, as shown in Figure 2 and groove I9! provides communication between outlet I89 and vent I88.

Solenoids I93 and I94 are controlled by suction operated switch mechanism I97, which consists of block I538, formed with suction cavity 200 and suction inlet 29!, a diaphragm 293, sealingly'secured to the periphery of cavity 200, a bracket 265 carrying micro-switchesZM and 208, an arm 2m pivotally secured to bracket 205 at 2H and centrally secured to diaphragm 203 by bolt 2I2. Arm 2H is normally biased outwardly from diaphragm 203 by coil spring 2I3, which is secured at one end to arm 2H) and adjustably secured at its other end, by screw 2 I4 to bracket Stop 2|! on brac et 2%5 limits outwardpor counterclockwise movement of arm 2). Screws H9 and 220, formed with bearing surfaces 222 and 223 are adjustably secured to arm 2H3 on opposite sides of pivot 2H, so as to at all times abut against spring loaded actuating plungers 225 and 226 respectively, of micro-switches 20! and 20B. Switches 291 and 268 are conventional micro-switches so constructed that when the actuating plungers 225 and 225 are permitted to movebutward past a predetermined point the contacts open, and when the plungers are forced inwardly beyond the same point, the contacts 'close. As arranged in the present device, with arm 2I0 pivoted between the two switches 201 and 208, any rotary movement of arm 2 I causes an application of pressure to one of the micro switch actuating plungers 225 or 226, and a release of pressure on the other plunger, so that, when bearing screws 2I9 and 220 are properly adjusted, one switch closes simultaneously with opening of the other.

Suction cavity 200 of switch mechanism I91, and suction inlet port I81 of valve I86 communicate with the intake manifold through tubular passages 230. Outlet port I89 communicates with fuel valve actuating diaphragm suction chamber 23I (identical with suction chamber 82 of Figure 1), through tubular passage 232 and may be connected to other suction operated devices such as cylinders 10 and 3I of Figure '1.

Electrical energy for the operation of solenoids I 93 and I94 is provided by battery 233 to independent circuits 235 and 236. Circuit 235 includes, in addition to ground 238 and battery 233, micro-switch 291, solenoid winding I 93, and com mon ground 239. Circuit 236 consists of ground 238, battery 233, micro-switch 208, solenoid winding I94 and common ground 239.

Operation of the device of Figure 2 is as fol- .lows:

When manifold suction is below a predetermined low value such as 5 inches Hg, spring 213 urges arm 2I0 in a counterclockwise direction against stop 2I1, thereby causing bearing surface 222 to move away from micro-switch 201 so as to permit outward movement of plunger 225, and consequent opening-of switch 201; at the same time bearing surface 223 moves toward microswitch 208 thereby urging plunger 226' inwardly and closing switch 208. Thus solenoid I93 is de-ene'rgized and solenoid I94 is energized, and closure member I90 is drawn toward solenoid I94, thereby closing suction inlet port I81 and permitting outlet port I89 to communicate with vent port I88.

When manifold vacuum increases to a predetermined value, the differential between the pressure within suction chamber 200 and amospheric pressure on the outer surface of diaphragm 203 is sufiicient to overcome the force of spring 2I3, so that arm 2 I I1 is rotated clockwise through a small are about pivot 2H and bearing surface 222 urges plunger 225 inwardly, thereby closing switch 281. and bearing surface 223 permits outward movement of plunger 226 and consequent simultaneous opening of switch 208. This circuit 235 through solenoid I93 is closed, and circuit 236 through solenoid I94 is opened, so that solenoid I93 is energized while solenoid I94 is de-energized, and closure member I 90 is drawn toward solenoid I93, thereby closing vent I88 and permitting communication between suction inlet port I81 and outlet port I 89.

We claim:

1. In an internal combustion engine having a plurality of cylinders, a carburetor having a plurality of mixture conduits for providing a fuel mixture to said cylinders. separate manifolds leading from said mixture conduits to said cylinders, a source of fuel, separate metered passageways for carrying said fuel from said source to said mixture conduits, and suction responsive valve means within one of said passageways for cutting off the flow of fuel through said passageway, said valve means comprising a cylindrical casing open at each end and sealingly mounted in said passageway, radial inlet ports communicating with said fuel source, a poppet type closure member adapted to sealingly seat in one end of said casing, said closure member being formed with a multilateral stem for slidable mounting within said casing, and spring means for urging said closure member toward seated position, and means for operating said valve including means forming a suction chamber, a diaphragm sealingly covering said suction chamber, spring means in said suction chamber for urging said diaphragm against said valve stem to open said valve, and passage means leading from said suction chamber to one of said manifolds.

2. In an internal combustion engine having a plurality of cylinders, a carburetor having a plurality of mixture conduits for providing a fuel mixture to said cylinders, separate manifolds leading from said mixture conduits to said cylinders, a source of fuel, separate metered passageways for carrying saidfuel from said source to said mixture conduits, and valve means responsive to a predetermined increased value of manifold suction for cutting off the flow of fuel through said passageway, said valve means comprising a cylindrical casing open at each end and sealingly mounted in said passageway, radial inlet ports communicating with said fuel source, a poppet type closure member adapted to sealingly seat in one end of said casing, said closure member being formed with a multilateral stem for slidable mounting within said casing, and spring means for urging said closure member toward seated position, and means for operating said valve including means forming a suction chamber, a diaphragm sealingly covering said suction chamber, spring means in said suction chamber for urging said diaphragm against said valve stem to open said valve, and passage means leading from said suction chamber to one of said manifolds.

3. In an internal combustion engine having a plurality of cylinders, a carburetor having a plurality of mixture conduits for providing a fuel mixture to said cylinders, separate manifolds leading from said mixture conduits to said cylin ders, a source of fuel, separate metered passageways for carrying said fuel from said source to said mixture, conduits, and valve means responsive to a predetermined increased value of manifold suction for cutting off the flow of fuel through said passageway and to a predetermined decreased value of manifold suction for permitting the flow of fuel through said passageway, said valve means comprising a cylindrical casing open at each end and sealingly mounted in said passageway, radial inlet ports communicating with said fuel source, a poppet type closure member adapted to sealingly seat in one end of said casing, said closure member being formed with a multilateral stem for slidable mounting within said casing, spring means for urging said closure member toward seated position, and means for operating said valve including means forming a suction chamber, a diaphragm sealingly covering said suction chamber, spring means in said suction chamber for urging said diaphragm against said valve stem to open said valve, and passage means leading from said suction chamber to one of said manifolds.

4. In an internal combustion engine having a plurality of cylinders, a carburetor having a plurality of mixture conduits for providing a fuel 1 1 mixture to said cylinders, separate manifolds leading from said mixture conduits to said cylinders, a source of fuel, separate metered passageways for carrying said fuel from said source to said mixture conduits, and valve means responsive to a predetermined increased value of manifold suction for cutting off the flow of fuel through said passageway, said valve means comprising a cylindrical casing open at each end and sealingly mounted in said passageway, radial in- 1a ports communicating with said fuel source, a poppet type closure member adapted to sealingly seat in one end of said casing, said closure member being formed with a multilateral stem for slidable mounting within said casing, and spring means for urging said closurev member toward seated position, and pumping means associated with said suction responsive valve means for forcibly injecting an increment of fuel into the mixture conduit fed by said valved passage-- determined value, said pumping means comprisin a pumping chamber in. constant communication with said valve casing, said resilient diaphragm forming one wall of said pumping chamber, fuel being drawn into said pumping chamber from said valve casing by the action of suction on said diaphragm and being forced out by said diaphragm spring means.

5. In an internal combustion engine having a plurality of cylinders, a carburetor having. a .plurality of mixture conduits for providing a fuel mixture to said cylinders, separate manifolds leading from said, mixture conduits to said cylinder's, a source of fuel, separate metered passageways, for carrying said fuel, from said source ,to-said mixture conduits, and valve means responsive to a predetermined increased value of manifold suction for cutting off the flow of fuel through said passageway and to a predetermined decreased value of manifold suction for permitting the flow of fuel through said passageway, said valve means comprising a cylindrical casing open at each end and sealingly mounted in said passageway, radial inlet ports communicating with said fuel source, a poppet type closure member adapted to sealingly seat in one end of said casing, said closure member being formed with a multilateral stem for slidable mounting within said casing, spring means for urging said closure member toward, seated position, and pumping means associated with said suction responsive ,valve' means for forcibly injecting an increment of fuel into the mixture conduit fed by said valved passageway when manifold. suction decreases to said predetermined value, said pumpingv means comprising a pumping chamber in constant communication with said valve casing, said resilient diaphragm forming one wall of said pumping chamber, fuel being drawn into said pumping chamber from said valve casing by the action of suction on said diaphragm and being forced out by said diaphragm spring means.

6 In an internal combustion engine having a plurality of cylinder groups, a carburetor having a plurality of mixture conduits for forming a fuel mixture for said cylinder groups, a pedal controlled throttle in one of said mixture conduits, separate manifolds connecting said mixture conduits and said cylinders, an auxiliary throttle in another of said mixture conduits, independent concentric shafts for mounting said throttles, linkage means operatively connecting said throtties. said linkage means comprising a countershaft provided with two cranks, a crank on the 12 shaft ofeach of said, throttles, a linker fixed length connecting the crank. on the pedal controlled throttle shaft to one of said countershaft cranks, a link of variable length connectingthe other countershaft crank to the crank on said auxiliary throttle shaft, and means responsive to predetermined increased values ofrmanifold duits, separate manifolds connecting said mixture conduits and said cylinders. an auxiliary throttle in another of said mixture conduits, independent concentric shafts for mounting said throttles, linkage means operatively connecting said throttles, said linkage means comprising-a countershaft provided with two cranks, a crank on the shaft of each of said throttles-a link of fixed length connecting the crank on the pedal controlled throttle shaft to one of said countershaft cranks, a link of variable length connecting the other crankshaftcrank to the crank on said auxiliary throttle shaft, and means responsive to predetermined increased values of manifold suction for shortening said variable link during periods of such predetermined suctions for the purpose of holding said auxiliary throttle open regardless of the position of said pedal controlled throttle, said suction responsive means comprising a cylinder pivotally secured at its closed end to the auxiliary throttle. crank, a piston slidably mountedin said cylinder, a. connecting rodfixedly secured to said piston at one. end pivotally secured to. said second countersh'aft crank, meansconnecting said cylinder to a source of manifold suction, and a coil spring in said cylinder for normally biasing said piston outwardly to lengthen said variable link.

8. In an internal combustion engine. having a plurality of cylinder groups, a carburetor hav.- .ing a source of liquid fuel anda pluralityof ,m-ixture conduits for. separately forming a fuelmix ture for each of said cylinder groups, manifolds connecting said conduits and said cylinder groups, means responsive to suction in the manifold for shutting off the supply of fuel to one of said conduits, passageways for connecting said suction, responsive means to one of said manifolds, valve means'interposed in said passageways for control-ling communication between, said man-ifold and said suction responsive means, solenoid means for actuating said valve, a source ofelectrical energy for said solenoid, and contact means responsive to suction in the manifold for energizing said solenoid,

9. In an automotive vehicle having trans- !nission, gear shift controls, a generator provided with a cut-out relay, an internal combustion engine having primary and secondary-cylinder groups, a carburetor having a source of liquid fuel. and primary and secondary mixture. con;- duits for separately forming a fuel mixture for each of said cylinder groups, primary and secondary manifolds respectively connecting said conduits and said cylinder groups, means responsive to suction in the primary manifold for shutting off the supply of fuel to said secondary con- 13 duits, passageways for connecting said suction responsive means to said primary manifold, valve means interposed in said passageway for controlling communication between said primary manifold and said suction responsive means, solenoid means for actuating said valve, an electrical circuit comprising said solenoid and a source of electrical energy therefor, contact means responsive to suction in the primary manifold for breaking said circuit, and additional contact means associated with said generator cut-out relay for breaking said circuit.

10. In an automotive vehicle having a transmission, gear shift controls, a generator provided with a cut-out relay, an internal combustion engine having primary and secondary cylinder groups, a carburetor having a source of liquid fuel and primary and secondary mixture conduits for separately forming a fuel mixture for each of said cylinder groups, primary and secondary manifolds respectively connecting said conduits and said cylinder groups, means respon sive to suction in the primary manifold for shutting off the supply of fuel to said secondary conduits, passageways for connecting said suction responsive means to said primary manifold, valve means interposed in said passageway for controlling communication between said primary manifold and said suction responsive means, solenoid means for actuating said valve, an electrical circuit comprising said solenoid and a source of electrical energy therefor, contact means responsive to suction in the primary manifold for breaking said circuit, and additional contact means associated with said generator cut-out relay for breaking said circuit, and a third contact means actuated by said gear shift controls for closing only when in high gear.

11. In an automotive vehicle having a transmission, gear shift controls, a clutch, a generator provided with a cut-out relay, an internal combustion engine having primary and secondary cylinder groups, a carburetor having a source of liquid fuel and primary and secondary mixture conduits for separately forming a fuel mixture for each of said cylinder groups, primary and secondary manifolds respectively connecting said conduits and said cylinder groups, means responsive to'suotion in the primary manifold for shutting off the supply of fuel to said secondary conduits, passageways for. connecting said suction responsive means to said primary manifold, valve means interposed in said: passageway for controlling communication between said primary manifold and said suction responsive means,

trical circuit comprising said solenoid and a source of electrical energy therefor, contact means responsive to suction in the primary manifold for breaking said circuit, and additional contact means associated with said generator cut-out relay for breaking said circuit, a third contact means actuated by said gear shift controls for closing only when in high gear, and a fourth contact means actuated by said clutch for closing only when said clutch is engaged.

12. In an automotive vehicle having a transmission, gear shift controls, a clutch, a gen.- erator provided with a cut-out relay, an internal combustion engine having primary and secondary cylinder groups, a carburetor having a source of liquid fuel and primary and secondary mixture conduits for separately forming a fuel mixture for each of said cylinder groups, a thermostatically controlled choke valve for reg- 14 ulating the admission of air to said conduits, primary and secondary manifolds respectively connecting said conduits and said cylinder as solenoid means for actuating said valve, an elecgroups, means responsive to suotion'in the primary manifold for shutting off the, supply of fuel to said secondary conduits, passageways for connecting said suction responsive means to said primary manifold, valve means interposed in said passageway for controlling communication between said primary -manifold and said suction responsive means, solenoid means for actuating said valve, an electrical circuit comprising said solenoid and a source of electrical energy therefor, contact means responsive to suction in the primary manifold for breaking said circuit, and additional contact means associated with said generator cut-out relay for breaking said circuit, and a third contact means actuated by said gear shift controls for closing only when in, high gear, a fourth contact means actuated by said clutch for closing only when said clutch isengaged, a fifth contact means actuated by said thermostatically controlled choke valve for closing only .when said choke valve is fully opened.

13. In an internal combustion engine having a:plurality of cylinder groups, a carburetor having a source of liquid fuel and a plurality of mixture conduits for separately forming a fuel mixture for each of said cylinder groups, a throttle :in each of said conduits, manifolds connecting said conduits and said cylinder groups, means responsive to suction in thefirst of said manifolds for shutting off the supply of fuel to the second of said conduits and for'sinriultaneously fully opening the throttle in said second conduit, additional means responsive to suction in the first manifold for additionally opening the throttle in the first manifold to compensate for the inoperativeness of the second cylinder group, passageways for connecting said suction responsive means to one of said manifolds, and valve means interposed in said passageways for controlling communication between said manfold and said suction responsive means.

14. In an internal combustion enging having a plurality of cylinder groups, a carburetor hav ing a source of liquid fuel and a plurality of mixture conduits for separately forming a fuel mixture for each of said cylinder groups, a throttle in each of said conduits, manifolds" connecting said conduits and said cylinder groups, means responsive to suction in the first of, said manifolds for shutting off the supply of fuel to the second of said conduits and for simultaneously fully opening the throttle in said second cond-uit, additional means responsive to suction 'in the first manifold for additionally opening the throttle in the first manifold M compensate for the inoperativeness of the second cylinder group, passageways for connecting said suction responsive means to one of said manifolds, and valvesponsive to suction in the first of said manifolds for shutting off the supply of fuel to the second of said conduits and for simultaneouslyfully open i-ilg the throttle in said second conduit, additional means responsive to suction in the first manifold for additionally opening the throttle in the first manifold to compensate for the moperativeness of the second cylinder group assageways for connecting said suction responsive means to one of said manifolds, and valve means interposed in said passageways for controlling communication between said manifold and said suction responsive means, and solenoid means for actuating said valve, a source of electrical energy for said sole noid, and contact means responsive to suction in the manifold for energizing said solenoid.

16. In an internal combustion engine having a plurality of cylinder groups, a carburetor having a source of liquid fuel and a plurality of mixture conduits for separately forming a fuel mixture for each of said cylinder groups, manifolds connecting said conduits and said cylindergroups, means responsive to suction in the manifold for shutting off the supply of fuel to one of said conduits, passageways for connecting said suction responsive means to one of said manifolds, and valve means interposed in said passageways for controlling communication between said manifold and said suction responsive means, said valve means comprising a substantially vertical tubular casing closed at its lower'end, a suction inlet port formed in said casing, a suction outlet port formed in said casing below said suction inlet port, and atmospheric vent ports formed in said casing below said suction outlet port, and a closure member slidably mounted in said casing, said closure member being formed with an annular groove of suffi'cient width to permit communication only between adjacent ports.

17. In an internal combustion engine having a plurality of cylinder groups, a carburetor having asource of liquid fuel and a plurality of mixture conduits for separately forming a fuel mixture for each of said cylinder groups, manifolds connecting said conduits and said cylinder groups, means responsive to suction in the manifold for shutting off the supply of fuel to one of said conduits, passageways for connecting said suction responsive means to one of said manifolds, and valve means interposed in said passageways for controlling communication between said manifold and said suction means, said valve means comprising a substantially vertical tubular casing closed at its lower end, 'a suction inlet port formed in said casing, a'suction outlet portformed in said casing be-- low' said suction inlet port, and atmospheric vent ports formed in said casing below said suction outlet port, and a closure member slidably mounted in said casing, said closure member being formed with an annular groove of su'flicient width to permit communication only between adjacent ports, and a solenoid coil mounted on said casing for elevating said closure member. 18. In an internal combustion engine having a plurality of cylinder groups, a carburetor having a source of liquid fuel and a plurality of mixture conduits for separately forming a fuel mixture for each of said cylinder groups, manifolds connecting said conduits and said cylinder groups, means responsive to suction in the manifold for shutting off the supply of fuel to oneof said conduits, passageways for connecting said suction responsive means to one of said manifolds, and valve means interposed in said passageways for controlling communication between saidmanifold and said suction responsive means,

responsive '16 said valve means comprising a substantially vertical tubular casing closed at its lower end, a suction inlet port formed in said casing, a-suction outlet port formed in said casing below said suction inlet port, and atmospheric vent ports formed in said casing below said suction outlet port, and a closure member slidably mounted in said casing, said closure member being formed with an annular groove of sufficient width to permit communication only be tween adjacent ports, and a solenoid coil mounted on said casing for elevating said closure member, a source of electrical energy communicating with said solenoid, and contact means for de-encrgizing said solenoid when suction in the first manifold is less than a predetermined value, said contact means comprising a frame, .a contact point insulatedly mounted on said frame, a contact arm pivotally secured to said frame, spring means for urging said contact arm against said point, said contact arm and point being connected in series with said solenoid coil, relatively'stronger spring means for urging said contact arm away from said point, and means responsive to manifold suction for neutralizing the effect of said stronger spring when manifold suction exceeds a predetermined value. 19. In an internal combustion engine having a plurality of cylinder groups, a carburetor having a source of liquid fuel and a plurality of mixture conduits for separately forming a fuel mixture for each of said cylinder groups, manifoldsconnecting said conduits and said cylinder groups, means responsive to suction in the manifold for shutting off the supply of fuel to one of said conduits, passageways for connecting said suction responsive means to one of said manifolds, and valve means interposed in said passageways for controlling communication between said manifold and said suction responsive means, said valve means comprising a substantially vertical tubular casing closed at its lower end, a suction inlet port formed in said casing, a suction outlet port formed in said casing below said suction I inlet port, and atmospheric vent ports formed tion'in' the first manifold is less than a predetermined value, said contact means comprising a frame, a contact point insulatedly mounted on said frame, a contact arm pivotally secured to said frame, spring means for urging said contact arm against said point, said contact arm and point being connected in series with said solenoid coil, relatively stronger spring means for urging said contact arm away from said point, and means responsive to manifold suction for neutralizing the effect of said stronger spring when manifold suction exceeds a predetermined value, and a second pair of contacts mounted on said frame and being separately connected in series with said solenoid and a solenoid actuated switch, said. second pair of contacts being arranged for'closing and opening at a relatively lower'predetermined value of manifold suction, said solenoid actuated switch being arranged to closewhen the solenoid is energized so that said valve closure member is raised when the first contact closes at a predetermined value of suction and is lowered by gravity when said second contact opens at predetermined relatively lower value of suction.

20. In an internal combustion engine, having a plurality of cylinder groups and separate manifolds leading thereto, means responsive to suction in said manifolds for shutting off the supply of fuel to one of said cylinder groups, a solenoid actuated valve for controlling the admission of suction to said suction responsive means, and suction responsive contact means for energizing said solenoid when manifold suction increases to a predetermined value, and for de-energizing said solenoid when suction decreases to a predetermined lower value.

21. In an internal combustion engine having primary and secondary cylinder groups, a carburetor having primary and secondary mixture conduits for separately forming a fuel mixture for said cylinder groups, primary and secondary manifolds leading from said mixture conduits to said cylinder groups, normally manually operable throttle valves in said mixture conduits, a source of liquid fuel communicating with said mixture conduits, means responsive to a predetermined increase in primary manifold suction for interrupting the supply of fuel to said secondary mixture conduit and for substantially fully opening the throttle valve therein, and additional means responsive to a predetermined decrease in primary manifold suction for forcibly injecting an increment of fuel into said secondary mixture conduit.

18 22. man internal combustion engine having primary and secondary cylinder groups, a carburetor having primary and secondary mixture conduits for separately forming a fuel mixture for said cylinder groups, primary and secondary manifolds leading from said mixture conduits to said cylinder groups, normally manually operable throttle valves in said mixture conduits, a source of liquid fuel communicating with said mixture conduits, means responsive to a predetermined increase in primary manifold suction for interrupting the supply of fuel to said secondary mixture conduit and for simultaneously substantially fully opening the throttle valve therein and increasing the opening of the primary throttle valve, and additional means responsive to a predetermined decrease in primary manifold suction for forcibly injecting an increment of fuel into said secondary mixture conduit.

CARL J. SNYDER.

GEORGE R. ERICSON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,166,968 Rohlin July 25, 1939 2,193,533 Kishline et al Mar. 12, 1940 2,315,183 Bicknell et a1 Mar. 30, 1943 2,421,800 Martin June 10, 1947 2,423,589 Ericson July 8, 1947

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Classifications
U.S. Classification477/91, 123/580, 123/198.00F, 123/198.00R, 123/184.39, 261/23.2, 180/315
International ClassificationF02M11/02, F02D17/02, F02D17/00, F02M11/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M11/02, F02D17/02
European ClassificationF02D17/02, F02M11/02