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Publication numberUS2625886 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 20, 1953
Filing dateAug 21, 1947
Priority dateAug 21, 1947
Publication numberUS 2625886 A, US 2625886A, US-A-2625886, US2625886 A, US2625886A
InventorsLindsay H Browne
Original AssigneeAmerican Brake Shoe Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pump
US 2625886 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L.. H. BROWNE Jan. 20, 1953 PUMP 'Filed Aug.' 21, 1947 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. LINDSAY H. BROWNE /Zzzzw M W ATTORNEYS Jan. 20, 1953 BROWNE 2,625,886

PUMP

Filed Aug. 21, 1947 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. v LINDSAY H. BROWNE BVZM M ATTORNEYS FIG. 2

Jan. 20, 1953 L. H. BRowNE 2,625,886

PUMP

Filed Aug. 21, 1947 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 L1 LQ n N m t N N N l SQ Q lyun w X 'I l INVENTOR. LINDSAY H. BRowNE ATTORNEYS L. H. BROWNE Jan. 20, 1953 PUMP 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Aug. 2l, 1947 m3 @Sw IN V EN TOR.

N W w B. WM A S L LW S Y E N R O I T. A

L. H. BROWNE Jan. 20, 1953 v PUMP Filed Aug. 21', 1947 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR. LINDSAY H. BROWN E M W YM s Y E N R O T T A Patented Jan. l20, 1953 PUMP Lindsay H. Browne, Weston, Conn., assigner to American Brake Shoe Company, Wilmington, Del., a corporation of Delaware Application August 21, 1947, Serial No. 769,883

9 Claims. (Cl. 10S-150) This invention relates to pumps and more spev ciiically to double-acting membrane pumps wherein the membranes are actuated by diierential uid pressure.

A primary object of my invention is to enable liquids which are considered relatively diicult to handle, such as for example, gritty water and the like, to be pumped in a novel and expeditious manner.

A further object is to construct Va novel doubleacting membrane pump wherein, under the control of a shuttle valve, working fluid is selectively fed by a gear pump to one or the other of two chambers to actuate distensible membranes therein.

Angther object of my invention is to automatically effect shifting of the aforesaid shuttle valve, in a novel and expeditious manner, upon actuation of the membranes to thereby cause the pump to feed working fluid to one and then the other membrane alternately.

A further object of my invention is to construct a novel hydraulically operated membrane pump wherein the pressure of the working uid is determined by the pressure of the liquid being pumped, and high pressures may be used therein with little deleterious eiect on the membrane of the pump.

Yet another object of my invention is to enable the construction of a compact membrane .pump of relatively large capacity, and capable of producing a substantially constant flow of liquid, wherein the membranes thereof are actuated relatively slowly, and subjected to relatively little flexure.

A further object of my invention is to construct a membrane pump wherein an oil pump which operates in a closed circuit furnishes working iiuid under pressure for actuating the membranes.

Another object is to construct a membrane pump of the aforesaid type in such a manner that the oil pump thereof may be submerged in oil during the operation of the membrane pump.

.Another object of my invention is to construct a novel membrane pump of the previously mentioned type wherein the oil pump and other mechanisms thereof which require lubrication .are automatically self-lubricated during the 0peration of the membrane pump.

Other and furtherv objects of the present invention will be apparent from the following description and claims and are illustrated in the accompanying drawings which, by way of illus- `tration, show a preferred embodiment and the principles thereof and what I now consider to be the best mode in which I have contemplated applying those principles. Other embodiments of the invention embodying the same or equivalent principles may be used and structural changes may be made as desired by those skilled in the art without departing from the present invention and the purview of the appended claims.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view taken substantially vertically through a pump embodying my invention;

Fig. 2 is a transverse sectional view taken substantially along the line 2-2 in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a partially sectional View taken substantially along the line 3-3 in Fig. 4;

Fig. 4 is a sectional View taken substantially along the line 4-4 in Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a rear elevational View of the pump shown in Fig. 2, looking in the direction opposite to that in which the pump is viewed in Fig. 2; and

Fig. 6 is a detail sectional view taken substantially along the line 6-6 in Fig. 4.

General The pump 20, shown in the accompanying drawings to illustrate the principles of my invention, embodies in general, a housing 22, two distensible membranes 24 and 25 adapted, upon distention back and forth, to pump liquid into and out of chambers 21 and 28 formed between the housing 22 and two end plates 30 and 3|, respectively. mounted thereon, a gear pump 33 for pumping oil or other suitable working fluid to the membranes 24 and 25 to actuate the latter, an actuator valve 35 for selectively controlling the flow of oil from the gear pump 33 to the membranes 24 and 25, and a selector valve 31 for controlling the operation of the actuator valve 35 in accordance with the operative positions of the membranes 24 and 25.

YConstruction. of the pump `20 kinspection plate 49 is attached by suitable means such as bolts 50 to the front wall 4l, in position to cover a hand hole or opening 52, Fig. 2, formed in the front wall 4I, and a cover plate 54 is attached by bolts 'to the rear wall 43 Ain position to cover an opening 51 formed in the latter. The top wall 42 and the bottom wall 44 have passageways 59 and 60, respectively, extending substantially longitudinally therethrough. Two passageways 62 and 63 extend from openings formed in the front portions of the top wall 42 and bottom wall `44, respectively, into` communication with the. passageways 59 and 60 intermediate the ends thereof.

The two end plates 30 and 3| are attached to the opposite end portions of the housing 22 by suitable means such as wing-nuts 68 and bolts 69, Figs. 3, 4 and 5. The end plates 30Y and. 3| and the end walls 45 and 46 are shaped so as toform the aforementioned chambers 21 and 28, Figs. l and 4, when the end plates areproperly mounted on the housing 22.

The end plate 30 has two passageways 1| andV 12 formed therein, the passageway 1| having one end in communication with the chamber 21 and the other end in communication with the passageway 59 in the housing 22, and the passageway 12 having one end in communication with the chamber 21 and the other` end in communication with the passageway 60. Likewise, the end plate 32 has two passageways 14 and 15 formed therein which interconnect the chamber 28 with the passageways 59 and 60, respectively.

Two Valve cages 11 and 18 are mounted in the passageways 1| and 14, respectively, in engagement with shoulders 8| and 82 formed' therein and are held in: such position by suitable means such as snap-rings 83 and B4. The valve cages 11 and 18 are ofanopen frame-work construction and each has a ball check-valve 86 and 81, respectively, mounted therein and yieldingly urged into engagement with a valve seat 69 and 90 by a compression spring92 and 93, respectively, theball check-valves l86 and 81 being eiective to close the passageways 1| and 14, when seated on the valve seats 89 and 90.

Two valve cages 95 and 9E are also mounted in the passageways 12 and 15 and are held in engagement with shoulders 98 and 99 therein by snap-rings and |02. The valve cages 95 and 96 are likewise of an open frame-work construction and have valve seats, |04 and |05 formed therein against which ball check-valves |01 and |08 are yieldingly urged by springs ||0 and mounted within the passageways 12 and 15, the ball check-valves |01 and |08 being effective to closethe passageways 12 and 15; when seated on the valve seats |04 and |05.

Each of the valve cages 11, 18, 95and 96 has sealing rings |13 mounted in grooves formed therein and engaged with the sidewalls of the respective passageways 1|, 14, 12 and 15 to prevent leakage of` fluid around the cages within the passageways during operation of my pump, the sealing rings ||3 being made of any suitable material such as, for example, a chlorobutadiene polymer (neoprene).

From the foregoing it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that inlet passages to those portions of the chambers 21 and' 28 outside of the distensible membranes 24 and 25, are provided through the passageways 63, 60 and 12, and through the passageways 63, 60 and 15, respectively, the outer end portion of the passageway 63 having screw threads ||5 formed thereon for readily connecting a suitable intake coupling thereto. Also, it will be apparent that outlet passages from those portions of the chambers 2'1 and 28 outside of the distensible members 24 and 25 are provided through the passageways 62,

59 and 1|, and the passageways l52, 59, and 14, respectively, the outer end portion of the passageway 62 having screw threads ||6 formed thereon for readily connecting a suitable outlet coupling thereto.

The distensible membranes 24 and 25 are connectedby nuts ||8 and ||.9,andnuts |2| and |22. respectively, to opposite end portions of' a valve rod 24 slidably mounted within a passageway |26, formed in the selector valve 31, in closetting engagement with the side walls thereof, suitable sealing rings |21 being mounted in the side walls ofY the passageway |26 at both ends thereof and engaged with the rod |24 to prevent leakagev of iiuid therebetween. The valve rod |24 extends through suitable openings |28 and |29 formed; in the end"v plates 45 and 46 of the housing 22, and sealing rings |3|, made of suitable material such as chlorobutadiene polymer, are mounted in grooves in the side walls of the openings to seal against leakage of iiuid through the openings past the rod |24.

The housing |33 of the selector valve 31v is mounted within the housing 22 substantially mid-Way between bosses |35 and |36, Figs. 1 and 4', formed in the end walls 45 and 46, positioning of the housing between the bosses |35 and |36 being effected by two bolts |38 and |39, Fig. l, screwed into tapped openingsformed inopposite end portions of the housing |33l and engaged with the bosses |35 and |36 respectively.. Lock-nuts |4| and |42 are mounted on the bolts |38 and |39 to hold the bolts in adjusted position. The housing |33 of the selector valve 31 is separable into two parts |33a and |331), Fig. 1, and a bolt |44 screwed into the part |33?) and engageable with the part |33a is effective to adjust the longitudinal position of these parts relative to each other.

The part |33a of the housing |33 has a pass-ageway |46, Fig. 4, formed therein, one end of which opens into the housing 22 and the other end of which interconnects with one end of a passageway |48. The other end of the passageway |48 interconnects with one end of each of two passageways |50 and |5|, the other ends of thepas'- sageways |50 and |5| having openings in which suitable coupling members |53 and |54, respectively, attached to one end portion of tubes |56 and |51, respectively, Figs. 1 and 4, may be connected for purposes to be discussed in greater detail presently'.

Likewise, the part |33b-of the housing |33 has a passageway |59 formed therein, one end of which opens into the housing 22 and the other end of which interconnects with one end of a passageway |6|. The other end of the passageway |6| interconnects with one end of eachV of two passageways |63 and |54, the other ends of the passageways |53 and |54, having openings in which suitable coupling members |66 and |61,v respectively, attached to one endl portionv of tubes 69 and |10, may be connected.

The end portions of` thel tubes |56 and |.691opposite to the end portions to which thev coupling members |53 and |66 are attached, arev connected to the chambers 21 and 28 by coupling members |68 and |1| sol that the passageways |50 and |63 in the selector valve 31 are connected to the respective chambers 21 and 28.

The valve rod |24 in the selector valve 31 has two radial grooves |12 and |13, Fig. 4, formed therein, the groove |12 being adapted to reciprocate between alignment with the passages |46 and |50 upon reciprocationof the rod |24, by

5, movement of the distensible' membranes 24 and 25 back and forth within the chambers 21 and 28, as will be discussed in greater detail hereinafter, and the groove |13 being adapted to reciprocate between alignment with the passages |59 and |63 upon such reciprocation of the rod |24. The actuator valve 35 includes a housing |15 attached to the inner face of the cover plate 54 on the housing 22 by suitable means such as bolts |11, Fig. 3. The housing |15 has a passage- Way |19 extending substantially longitudinally therethrough and the ends of which are closed by suitable plugs |8| and |82.

A plurality of vpassageways |84, |85, |86, |81,l

|88, |89 and |90, Fig. 4, extend transversely through the housing |15 from the passageway |19; the passageway |84 having threads tapped therein for connection to a coupling member |92 on the end of the tube |51, opposite the end to which the coupling member |54 is connected; the passageway |85 opening downwardly, Fig. 6, into the housing 22; the passageway |86 interconnecting with one end portion of a passageway |94 which extends -through one end portion of the cover plate 54 and the other end of which is connected by a passageway |96, extending through the end-wall 45, to the chamber 21 inwardly of the distensible membrane 24; the passageway |81 interconnecting with the upper end portion of a passageway |98 which extends vertically through a portion of the cover plate 54, Figs. 2, 4 and 5; the passageway |88 interconnecting with an end portion of a passageway 200 which extends through the other portion of the cover plate 54, opposite to that in which the passageway |96 is located, and is connected by a passageway 202 in the end wall 46 to the chamber 28; the passageway |89 opening downwardly into the housing 22 in a manner similar to that hereinbefore discussed with respect to the passageway |85; and the passageway |90 having threads tapped therein by which a coupling member 204, on the end of the tube opposite the end to which the coupling member |61 is attached, may be connected t'o the passageway |90.

A valve rod 206, having valve heads 203 and 209 formed thereon, is slidably mounted within the passageway |19 in the actuator-valve housing with the heads 208 and 209 in close tting engagement with the sidewalls of the passage- Way |19. As is best seen in Fig. 4, the valve heads 298 and 299 are so positioned on the valve rod that when the rod 296 occupies the position shown in Fig. '4, wherein it is displaced to full extent in one direction in the passageway |19, the valve head 288 is positioned between the passageways |85 and |86 to seal the passageway |19 therebetween, and the valve head 209 is positioned between the passageways |81 and |88 to seal the passageway |19 therebetween. Likewise, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that when the valve rod is displaced to full extent in the opposite direction in the passageway |19 (that is, to the right as viewed in Fig. 4) the valve head 208 will then be positioned between the passageways |86 and |81 and the valve head 209 will be positioned between the passageways |88 and |89. The operation of my novel pump is controlled by shifting the valve rod 206 back and forth between these two positions in the passageway |19, as will be discussed in greater detail hereinafter.

Two sealing rings 2|| and 2|2 are mounted in grooves formed in the opposite end portions of the side walls of the passageway `|19 to sealA against leakage of uid within the passageway past the valve rod 206 between the passageways 1 of a substantially vertically extending passage-l way 2|0, Figs. 2 and 5, formed in the cover plate 54. The upper `Vend portion of the passageway 2|6 is in communication through an opening 2|1 with the intake side of the oil pump 33, Fig. 2, and the pressure side, or outlet side of the oil pump 33 is in communication through an opening220 with the lower end portion of the passageway |99 which it will be remembered is connected to the passageway |81 in the actuator valve 35. When my novel pump is in operation, it is desirable that the housing 22 be filled .with

oil to a level suilciently high to cover the pump 33. Therefore, it will be seen that a supply of oil is always available within the housing 22 to be fed through the passageways 2|4 and 2|6 into the pump 33. v

The pump S3, shown in the accompanying drawings, is of the type commonly known as a gear-type pump and embodies a driving gear 2 I 8 and a driven gear 2|9, Fig. 5. The gear 2|8 is fastened on a shaft 22| which is journaled in suitable bearings and projects outwardlythrough an opening 223 in the cover plate 54, the outwardly projected end portion of the shaft 22| being adapted to be coupled to a suitable motor or other type of prime mover, not shown, for driving the gears 2|8 and 2|9, as will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

A pressure relief valve 225 of the diaphragm type has an inlet passageway 221 connected by a passageway 228 in the cover plate 54 to the oil passageway |98, on the pressure side of the pump 33, and has an outlet passageway 230 connected to a passageway 232 opening into the housing 22 and extending transversely through the cover plate 54. A ball check-valve 234 is normally held by a compression spring 236 in effective position to close the connection between the inlet passageway 221 and the outlet passageway 280 of the relief valve 225 and thereby prevent feeding of oil from the pump 33 through the valve 225 and back into the housing 22. However, when the pressure of the oil discharged into the passageway |93 rises above a predetermined pressure, the resulting force applied to the diaphragm 238 thereof is effective to unseat the ball 234 and thereby relieve the pressure in the passageway |98 by opening the connecting passageways 221 and 230 therefrom back to the interior of the housing 22.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the gear pump 33, the chambers 21 and 28, the actuator valve 35 and the selector valve 31 are all operatively interconnected. By this interconnection, the gear pump 38 is enabled, upon operation thereof, to cause the membranes 24 and 25 to be distended back and forth within the chambers 21 and 28 and thereby effect a pumping operation of my novel pump 20, as will be discussed in greater detail presently.

Operation As previously stated, my novel pump 20 may be used to pump fluids, and is especially well adapted to pump gritty and dirty water, liquids containing sludge, and ylike liquids, which 7 have alwaysbeen consideredtobe relatively dificultl` to pump because of theL entrainedsolid matter.

When my pumpis tobe used for pumping a liquid, a suitable pipe or tube, not shown, may be connected between the source ofthe liquid and therintake passageway 63, and another suitable pipe or tube, not shown,` may be connected to the discharge'passageway 62 for discharging the fluid from the pump. Also, for furnishing the power to operate myV pump 20, the oily pump 33 is connected by the shaft 22| to a suitable source ofpower, not shown, such as a motor or the like. After the aforesaid connections have been made operation of my pump is initiated by starting the motor connected to theshaft 22|, to thereby drive the oil. pump 33.V

Assuming that the parts'` of my'pump 20 are in the positions shown in the drawings-.when operation of my pump 20 is initiated, it will be noted thatthe oil pump 33, driven 'by the motor, will take in oil from the reservoir within the housing 2-2'through the passageways 2|4, 2|6, Fig. 2, and will discharge the oil under pressure through the passageways 229 and |98 into the passageway |81 in the actuator valve 35, and from the passageway |81 through a portion of the passageway |19 in the actuator valve 35, and through the passageways |86, |94 and |96 into the chamber 21 inwardly of the distensble membrane 24, thus movingv the distensible membrane 24 from the position shown in Figs. 2 and 4 toward the outer side ofthe chamber 21. At this time the valve head 208 is sealing the passageway |86 from the passageway |35,A and the valve head 209 is sealing the passageway |81 from the passageway |88 so that iiow of oil through the actuated valve 35 from the passageway |98 is restricted to the passageways |81, |19 and |86.

Thevalve head 209 being positioned between the passageways |81 and |88 at this time, the chamber 28, inwardly of the distensible membrane 25, is in open communication with the reservoir, in the housing 22 through the passageways 202, ,200, |88, |19 and |89 so that any oil in the chamber 28 may be fed into` the reservoir upon movement of the distensible membrane 25 inwardly which movement accompanies the aforesaid outward movement of the membrane 24 andthe resultant movement of the valverod |24as viewed in Fig. 4.

Atthestart. of this movement of the rvalve rod" |24 to the left, it will be noted that the rod |24-is in position to seal the passageway |50 and ythereby prevent. entrance of oil from the chamber 2.1 into thev passageway ,|50 through the tube |56. However, the radial groove |13 is aligned with the; passageway |63 so that oil my flow under pressure from the chamber 28 through the tube |69, the passageways |63 and |64 in the selector valve 31, the tube |10, and the passageway |90 in the actuator valve 35, into that portion of the passagewayv |19 to the right of. the valve rod 206, asl viewed in Fig. 4 to thereby hold the valve rod 206 in position shown in Fig. 4..

As the distensible membrane 24 is moved outwardly toward the cover plate 30 by the pressure of the oil fedY by the oil pump 33, any liquid between the cover plate 30 and the membrane 24 is forced out through the passageway 1|, lifts the ball 86 off the valve seat 89, and is discharged out through the passageways 59 and 62, the spring ||0 and the pressure of the liquid being effective to hold the ball. |01 of. the intake valve against thevalveseat |04 and thereby prevent `back-flow of uquid from mecha-mbar 21 into the intakepas-- unseats'the ball |08, and iiows through the pas-A sageway 15 into the chamber 28, the spring 93 being eifective to hold the other ball 81 of the outlet valve against the valve seat to prevent leakage from the chamber 28 into the discharge passages 62 and'59.

The movement of the valve rod |24 to the left, as viewed in Fig. 4, moves the radial grooves |12 and |13 Vto the left; out of alignment with the passageways |46 and |03, respectively, and the rod` |24 becomeseiective to seal all the passageways |50, |46, |59 and |63 through the selector valve 31. As a result, the oil in the passageway |19 to the right of the valve rod 206 in the actuator valve 35, as Viewed in Fig. 4, is trapped therein and is effective to hold the valve rod 206 to the left as viewed in Fig. 4.

At substantially the end of the movement of the membranes 24 and 25 andtheY rod |24 tothe left, as viewed in Fig. 4, the radial grooves |12A and |13 in the rod |24 move into alignment with the passageways |50 and |59, respectively. Movement of the radial groove |13 into alignment with the passageway |59 opens the passageway |59 to thereby permit the oil which was trapped in the end portion of the passageway 19, to the right of the valve rod 206 asr viewed in Fig. 4, to ow through the passageway |90 in the actuator valve 35, the tube |10, and the passageways |64, |6| and |59 in the selector valvev 31, into the reservoir in the housing 22, to thereby release the oil pressure on the right end of the valve rod 206. Movement of the radial groove |12 in the rod |24 into alignment with the passageway |53 opens the passageway |53 and thereby permits oil under pressure within the chamber 21 to flow from the chamber 21 through the tube |56, the passageways |50 and |5| in the selector valve 31, the tube |51, and the passageway |84 in the actuator valve 35, into that portion of the passageway |19 to the left of the valve rod 206, as ,viewed in Fig. 4, to thereby force the valve rod 206 to the right,

Movement of the valverod 206 to the right reverses the flow into, and out of, the chambers 21 and 28, that is, a passage isv opened from the oil pumps 33 through the passageways |98, |81, |19, |88, 200 and 262 into the chamber 28, and a passage is opened from the chamber 21 through the passageways |96, |94, |86, |19 and' |85 back into the reservoir within the housing 22, so that movement of the membranes 24 and 25 and the valve rod |24 is quickly reversed toA thereby take liquid in through the passageways 63, 60 and 12 into the chamber 21 and discharge liquid from the chamber 28 through thev passageways 14', 59 and 62.

The movement of the valve rod |24 to the right withI the membranes 24 and 25 quickly closes the passageways |50, |46, |59 and |63 in the selector valve 31 to thereby trap the oil under pressure in the passageway |19v to the left of the valve rod 206, as viewed in Fig. 4, and to trap the oil under pressure in the chamber 28.

These cycles of. operation continue to repeat 4first in one direction and then in the other throughout the operation of my pump, and it will be seen that the flow` of liquid pumped by my novel pump is substantially continuous.

From the foregoing it will be seen that I have provided a novel membrane pump wherein the membranes thereof may be actuated in a novel and expeditious manner by working fluid fed thereto, under pressure, from a gear-type pump.

Furthermore, it will be noted that the oil pump in my novel membrane pump operates in a closed circuit whereby maximum elliciency may be realized from it.

Also, it will be seen that during the operation of my novel pump the membranes thereof are subjected to little distorting pressure because the pressure of the oil causing the actuation thereof is dependent on the pressure of the liquid being pumped and the differential therebetween is relatively small. Thus, it will be seen that liquid may be pumped by my novel pump at relatively high pressures (the pressures running to several thousand pounds) with little deleterious effect on the membranes of the pump.

In addition it will be seen that the operation of my membrane pump is automatically controlled by mechanism which operates in a novel and expeditious manner. v Y

Further, it will be noted that the ileXure of the membranes of my novel pump is relatively slight during the operation of the latter so that the membranes are subjected to very little fatigue stresses.

Also, it will be noted that my novel pump comprises a pleasing appearing, compact and efiicient unit which operates smoothly with relatively little vibration.

Hence, while I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that these are capable of variation and modification and I therefore dov vnot wish to be limited to the precise details set forth, but desire to avail myself of such changes and alterations as fall within the purview of the following claims.

I claim:

1. A pump comprising a housing having two vchambers formed therein, two membranes, each to thereby distend said membranes therein, means connected to said chambers for passing liquid into and out of said chambersupon movement of said membranes, valve means for controlling the feeding of said working fluid from said iluid pump to said chambers, and means connected between said membranes for selectively controlling said valve means to thereby effect feeding of working fluid from. said fluid pump alternately to one and then the other of said chambers, said last named means including a portion of said housing having two pairs of passageways therein, one of said passageways in each of said pairs being connected to a corresponding one of said chambers and opening into said reservoir for feeding fluid from said chamber to said reservoir, and the other of said passageways in each of said pairs being connected to a corresponding one of said chambers and to said valve means for feeding fluid from said chamber to said valve means, and a slide rod mounted in said portion of said housing and connected to said membranes for movement therewith for selectively opening and closing all of said passageways to thereby control the flow of fluid through all of said passageways from said chambers to said reservoir and said valve means.

2. A pump comprising a housing having a chamber formed therein, inlet and outlet means connected to said chamber, said housing embodying a reservoir adapted to be filled to a predetermined level with a supply of working fluid, a distensible membrane mounted in said chamber, means including a fluid pump mounted within said reservoir in said housing below said predetermined'level for feeding working fluid `under pressure from said reservoir to said chamber, and means for controlling the flow of said working fluid to said chamber, said last named means including valve means defining passageways connected to said chamber and said reservoir, and a valve rod slidably mounted in said passageways and connected to said membrane for movement therewith, said rodv having large and small portions thereon for selectively opening and closing saidpassageways and controlling the flow of fluid through said passageways during such movement of said rod with said membrane. x

3. A pump comprising a housing having two chambers formed therein, means for .passing liquid into and out of said chambers, said housing embodying a reservoir adapted tobe filled to a predetermined level with a supply of working fluid, distensible membranesin said chambers, means including a gear-tvpe pump mounted vwithin said reservoir in said housing below said predetermined level for feeding working fluid under pressure from said reservoir to said chambers, and valve means for controlling the ilow of working fluid from said gear-type vpump to said chambers, said valve means being operable to alternately prevent and permit the flow-of working iluid from said gear-type pump to one `and then the other of said chambers, said valve means including a portion of said housing having a plurality of passageways therein connected to said chambers, and a valve rod vslidably mounted in said portion of said housing and connected to said membranes for movement therewith, said rod extending through said passagewavs and having large and small portions thereon for selectively opening and closing said passageways during such movement of said rod with said membranes. f

4. A pump comprising a housing having two chambers formed therein. inlet and outlet means connected to said chambers, said housing embodying a reservoir adapted to hold a supply of working fluid, distensible membranes mounted in said chambers and extending thereacross. means including a working-fluid pump for establishing a closed circuit between said reservoir and said chambers whereby working-fluid may flow from said reservoir to said chambers and back to said reservoir, said working-Huid pump being operable to force working-fluid under pressure through part of said last named means to said chambers to thereby apply pressure to said distensible membranes, and means for selectively controlling the flow of working-fluid through said means for establishing aclosed circuit, said means for selectively controlling the flow of working-duid being operable to direct the flow `of wir,4

working-fluid from said working-fluid pump 21'1- ternately to one and then the other of said chambers, said lastl named means including valve means, defining `elongated passageways connected between saidY chambers and said reservoir and working fluid pump., and a valve rod operatively connected to said membranes for movement therewith, said rod extending transversely through said passager/ave, and having Ymeans thereon for selectively opening and closing said passageways during such movement of said rod with Ysaid membranesv A pump comprising a housing having two Chambers formed. thereinfsaid housing embodying a .reservoir adapted to held esupply 0f Work- -iiuidzeaeh Oizsed chambers tailings-valves 'et' passageway and valved outlet passageluembrenes mounted in said chambers and este ding thereeeress and being adapted-te be 'dis ndeclin two vc lirections therein;A means includin a duid ypunip Yf or establishing s aclosed circuit or working-huid between said reservoir and'said. ehembersfsad Vduid Pump being Operable to 'feedj working-fluid under pressure through a part of said A,means to said chambers to thereby apply pressure to said membranes for distending the latter, means including a movable valve member for selectively controlling the flow of working-huid to said chambers, said lastrfnamed means being eiiective when said valve member is disposed in one position to direct the low'iofworking-i'luid from said uid pump to one of' said chambers and when said valve member Yis'disposed in anotherY position to direct the flow of working-fluid from said Yfluid pump to the other of said chambers, and selector means including a valve rod operatively connected between said membranes in said chambers "for Vselectively controlling the position of'ffsaidvalve member-inaccordance with the position of said membranes within said chambers.

6'. 'A pump comprising a housing having two chambers formed therein, inlet 'andoutlet :means connected tn said chambers,- tWo membranes, each of' said membranes 'beingA mounted` in a correspondingone. ofsaid chambers andextending thereacross, said Vmembranes being distensible in two 'directionsin said chambers, means including a iiui'd pump for 'feeding working-fluid under pressure into each of said chambers on onev side-of the Vmembrane therein for distending said'membra-nes toward they other side of -said chambers, arconneetlemember interconneotingesaid membra es, said connecting-member being movable; Said; membranes-endopzerable tta-.impart distending movement. to each of-said Membranes;- upon distending movement cfftbez-ethero said membranes, a Vmei/ably mounted valve member-associated with saidsecond; named meansfor selectively. controlling the new ofworking-fluid from5 said pump to said chambers, said; valve'V `member being adapted whenfdisposed in one positionv to'direct thel now afwerking-fluidfrom said, fluid pump to one of said' chambers-and-whenidisposed in another position to. .direct theflow of working-uuid from saiduidepump tO-thelother of said chambers, and .a valve unitY connected to said chambers for feeding working-fluid to said valve member towposition the latter, said'valve unit including said connecting member, and said connecting, member being movably mounted in said valve .unit and being `operable upon movement with said"me rnbranes to open and close said valve unit Vin accordance with the position of said membranes and to thereby control the feedingof uid to said valve :member and thereby control the nosition of said yvalve member.

7. A pump comprising a housing having two chambers formed therein, two membranes, each of said membranes being mounted in a corresponding one of said chambers and extending thereacross, said membranes being distensible back and forth within said chambers, a connecting member interconnecting said membranes, and reciprocable therewith upon distensible movement of said membranes back and forth within said chambers, liquid inlet and outlet means opening into said chambers on one side of the membranes therein, means including a fluid pump for alternately feeding working-fluid under -pressure into one and then the other of said chambers on the other-side of said membranes to thereby alternately distend one oil said membranes and then the other toward said one side of said chambers, and. valve means for controlling the operation of said last named means, said valve means being operable to alternately-vent rst one and then the. other of said chambers on said other side of said membranes to the interior of said housing to thereby relieve the pressure of the working-huid ted by said pump into said chambers, said connecting member being slidably mounted in said valve means and being effective -to control the operation Aof said valve means in timed relation to the movement of said membranes and thereby being effective. to control the venting of said chambers to said housing, and to control said means for feeding working-fluid, .in timed relation to the lmovement of said membranes.

8. A pump comprising a housing having` two chambers formed therein, two membranes, .each of said membranes being mounted in a .corresponding one of said chambers andY .extending thereacross, said Amembranes `being distensible in said chambers in inward and outward directions relative to said housing, a connecting member interconnecting said membranes to thereby effect inward distending movement of' each of said membranes during outward distending movement of the other of said membranes and outward distending movement of each of said membranes during inward distending movement of the other of said membranes, liquid inlet and outlet means opening into said chambers outwardly of said membranes, means including a iiuid pump for feeding working-fluid under pressure `into said chambersv inwardly Vof said membranes. to effect distention of said membranes outwardly, an actuator valve connectedto said duid bump, said actuator valve including a valve rod mov-ably mounted therein, said actuator Valve being, operable when said rod isv disposed in one position to selectively direct working fluid from said fluid pump to one of said chambers to thereby eiect outward distention 0I" the-membrane in said one chamber, and said'actuator valve being operable when said valve rod is disposed in another position to selectively direct working-duid from said fluid pump to the other of said chambers to thereby eiiect outward distention of the membrane in said other chamber, and a selector valve operatively interconnecting said chambers inwardly of said membranes with said actuator valve and the interior or saidhousing for feeding working-iiuid from said chambers to said actuator valve to thereby lmove said valve rod back and forth between said one position and said other Vposition and for venting said chamber to the interior of said housing, said selector valve including said connecting member and said connecting member being operable to control the operation of said selector valve in accordance with the position of one of said membranes whereby when said one membrane is in full inwardly distended position said selector valve is effective to selectively direct working-uid to said actuator valve to thereby move said valve rod to said one position and when said one membrane is in full out wardly distended position said selector valve is eective to selectively direct working-fluid to said actuator valve to thereby move said valve rod to said other position.

9. A pump comprising a, housing having two chambers formed therein, two membranes, each of said membranes being mounted in a corresponding one of said chambers and extending thereacross, said membranes being distensible in -two directions in said chambers, means including a fluid pump for feeding working-uid under pressure into each of said chambers on one side of the membrane therein for distending said membranes toward the other side of said chambers, a movably mounted valve member connected to said means for controlling the flow of working-fluid from said pump to said chambers, said valve member being adapted when disposed in one position to direct the flow of working-fluid from said pump to one of said chambers and when disposed in another position to direct the flow of working-fluid from said pump to the other of said chambers, and a valve unit mounted between said chambers and connected thereto for feeding working-fluid to said valve member to position the latter, said valve unit including an elongated member movably mounted therein and having two opposite end portions each operatively connected to a respective one of said membranes, said elongated member being movable with said membranes upon distending movement of the latter, and said elongated member being operable upon movement of said membranes to selectively open and close said valve unit in accordance with the position of said membranes and to thereby control the position of said valve member.

LINDSAY H. BROWNE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 491,116 Keeney Feb, 7, 1893 514,608 Weatherhead Feb. 13, 1894 2,186,970 Hambly Jan. 16, 1940 2,204,854 Hambly June 18, 1940 2,212,667 Mayer Aug. 27, 1940 2,239,715 Hollander et al. Apr. 29, 1941 2,260,306 Ferguson Oct. 28, 1941 2,435,179 McGovney Jan. 27, 1948

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Classifications
U.S. Classification417/390, 417/454, 417/393, 417/900, 417/63, 92/48, 91/304
International ClassificationA01B69/04, F04B43/073, F01L25/06
Cooperative ClassificationF01L25/066, F04B43/0736, Y10S417/90, A01B69/008
European ClassificationF01L25/06H, F04B43/073C, A01B69/00F1