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Publication numberUS2627667 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 10, 1953
Filing dateOct 7, 1946
Priority dateOct 7, 1946
Publication numberUS 2627667 A, US 2627667A, US-A-2627667, US2627667 A, US2627667A
InventorsGillis Joseph R
Original AssigneeGillis Joseph R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for drying inks
US 2627667 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. R. GlLLlS METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DRYING INKS 2 SHEETSSHEET l INVENTOR. c7037; K. 6/7/16 ATTORNEY Feb. 10, 1953 Filed 001;. '7,

w 6 m w 4. /i m. I; x J i mpw l Feb. 10, 1953 J. R. GlLLlS METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DRYING INKS Filed Oct. '7, 1946 2 SI-lEETS-SHEET 2 I N VEN TOR.

Joaaafi R. 617/16 ATTORNEY:

Patented Feb. 10, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,627,667 Ms'rnon AND APPARATUS ron DRYING INKS Joseph-R. Gil1is,Kalamazoo,:Mich. Application October 7, 194's,fseiiallnogm' ssi 'is'cieims. (01. 34-23) 1 This invention relates to mprovements in methods and apparatus Ifor drying inks.

The principal objects of this invention are: First, to provide "am'etho'd for effectively and quickly drying the-inkias it comes "fromthe print ing'machine'orpress.

Second, to provide novel mechanism for eifectively drying the ink on printed matter as it comes from a .printing .press without smearing the ink or damaging'the web.

Tihrd, to provide apparatusf'or drying the ink on printed matter which eliminates "the .fire hazard present in the use of inks with volatile solvents.

Fourth, to provide a mthodfo-r drying the ink of printedmatter which permits the use of high speed printing on a continuous Web of paper.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will be apparent from the description .to follow. The inventionis further pointed out in the claims. Y

The drawings, of which there aretwosheets, i-llustrate :a preferred formof-my invention. I

'Fig. '1 is a side levational view partially broken away of my drying apparatus operative position relative toJthe web of. a -printing press, parts of "the .press'being shown in schematic outline only.

Fig. 2 is :a fragmentaryvertical cross-sectional view along the plane'2- 2'inl ig.

"Fig. '3 is a planview partiallybroken away along the plane 3--3.-in Figs. 1 and'2.

Fig. 4 is a transverse vertical cross-sectional view along the plane. 4-4 in Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view along the plane 5-5 inFig. 2. v

'I'here have beennumerous systems devisedfor the purpose of quick dryinginks. after the printing operation. 'In quick drying byevaporation of an ink solvent it hass'been the practice to use the heat of either burninggas jets or heated air blown on the traveling web of papers. These methods have many drawbacks, such as the danger or 'fire, removal of moisture from the paper which destroys its mechanical strength and the inability to furnish enough heated air to allow the paper to. run atIhigh-speeds.

Myprocess consists of discharging superheated steam directly against the web from jets located close to the web andto eiihaustor draw off this a steam and the solvent vapors driven o'ff'by or combined therewith before the steam ha a chance to condense and wet 'or spot the paper. Thesubjectingbf;theipapeftoysteam.under,.pressure "and the application '61 exhaust "suction thereto makes it highly desirable "to provide means for'holdingthejpaper so'that'it will not flutterwhile,beingtreated and contact the steam jets or other parts'on the jjpri'nted side of the paper and so that the evacuation of the steam will'be complete.

The "embodiment of zny. -invention illustrated consists generally "of a steam chamber I and "a suction or exhausth'eaderijpositione'd above and closely .adjacent'ito the Webfof "paper'or othermaterial 'treated,theapparatus being shown in association with a. printing press "conventional-1y indicated at 4. 'Thesuctio'n chamber 5 is disposed below the steam chamber and is provided with a fora'minate platen .or face across which the Wbis jtraln's'lated'whil'eit is'Slibject-to the steam. Theweb is illustrated as being wound into a roll 1 "after treatment but it .r'nay be directed to any desired type of folding and cutting mechanism.

The steam ,"chamber'l ihas a relatively narrow steam space ifll'l, "thisisteam space Ecomprising a bottom or .nozz'le gplate iBfh-aving a plurality of transversely disposed rib lik'e nozzles 19'. defining a series of forwardly .directed jet lpassages HI opening to theinclinedltip'sli of the nozzles. The I bottom or Z nozzle iipla'te has .the side plates 12 weldedthereto.ianditofthe top plate or wall 13 to :provide the J'St'ea'm chamber or header for theirozzles. The. steam jsupply p'ipe T4 is connectedto-clliver'l'm'theiorward end of the chamb'e'r. .Baffle "plates [5 :are positioned Y -between the topanid'bottomplates toprovide a series of zi zag connected nozzlefheaderswithin the-chamber.

'Theftop plate is provided with aninsulating material "LB Ire'tained.1by the suitable covering panel n, I the insulating material. defining .a re cess i8 cnjits lower-side withinwhich are positioned a series of electrical heating units 19; clamped'upon .the top plate. i=3 by a means of the clamps!!! so that .thef-heating units are in an.effectivelheattransferrelation tothe top-s oi nozzle headers or the steam-chamber. The side plates'lz extend downwardlyand enclose the ends of the nozzlesand desirably. terminate somewhat below the web '3. This provides a nozzle chamber, the webextending against, or constituting a closure, one side of 'l'the' chamber. It also provides a series-of steam pockets 162 between the noz'zles,the onlycommuriication by these. pockets beingthespaces'ibetween the" ends of the. nozzles and theweb. v f

p The front bar 52 2 depends from .the front .end of J the bottom, memberi 8 and .c'onstitutes a wall for'the. front, endro'f the no z ale chamber. The

rearbarerwau member"?! depends from the rear end of the wall member 8 and is provided with exhaust openings 3|. It will be noted that the nozzles and the wall members 22 and 23 terminate close to the surface of the web with only such clearance as is practical without actually having the surface of the web contact with these parts. This clearance is desirably between .0012 and .008 inch.

The suction chamber is in the form of a box-like header 24 having a series of V sectioned bars 25 (see Fig. 5) disposed longitudinally thereof to provide a grid-like supporting surface across which the web is translated while subject to such suction as to prevent vibration or fluttering of the web which would cause it to contact the nozzles or the walls of the nozzle chamber. These bars 25 diverging downwardly prevent clogging of the slots by lint or fiber drawn from the web as it travels over the platen. The suction or vacuum pipe shown at 26.

The suction header 2 is positioned at th rear of .the steam chamber and nozzle chamber to exhaust the steam and any solvent that may be picked up by the steam and carry it away preventing any condensation thereof such as might dampen or spot the web. The suction or exhaust header extends completely across the web. The upper or top wall of the exhaust header defines a flange outlet 21 for the attachment of the exhaust or suction pipe 6. nozzle plates 28 are arranged within the suction header extending longitudinally across the same and converging upwardly to communicate with the conduit 6 which distributes the exhaust or exhaust effect of the suction header across the web. The lower edges of the plates 218 slope upwardly from a point at the rear of the suction box and closely adjacent to the web 3 to a vertical panel 29 near the front of the suction box or header. A fine mesh screen 3!] slopes upwardly and forwardly against the lower edges of these plates to further equalize or distribute the draft or suction eifect within the suction header.

In operation of my apparatus, superheated steam is supplied through the pipe M to the steam chamber. The heating units [9 are provided and arranged to maintain the steam in its superheated condition as it is distributed through the several nozzle headers to the nozzles. I have found that a pressure of between 40 and pounds isv desirable for the entering steam. The web is translated, below the nozzle across the supporting platen by the suction in the suction box thereby preventing fluttering or vibration of the web. The superheated steam is directed and discharged directly upon theprinted surface of theweb desirably in a forwardly directed path opposite to) the direction of travel of the web. r

The parts constituting the. walls of the steam pockets between these nozzles are heated by the steam so thatcondensation of the steam is prevented in thes pockets and the steam in the pockets constitute additional drying means for the web; that is, means in addition to the direct impact of the jets.

The tendency of the steam to move forwardly below the wall 22 is effectively counteracted by movement of the web and the exhaust suction of the exhaust header so that the steam together with the volatile components of the ink which may be drivenofi by the heat are drawn rearwardly between the lower edges of th nozzles and the web andexhausted by the exhaust header. The exhaust header is as stated de- A series of baiiie or signed to insure a substantially uniform exhaust vacuum transversely across the web. This not only results in effective exhausting of the steam but it prevents excessiv pull on the web by drawing one portion of it'away from the platen which might result in its being brought into contact with some stationary part other than the platen. The exhaust header is desirably provided with insulating covering 3| and if operating conditions are such as to be likely to result in condensation in the exhaust header, I contemplate employing heating elements with- I in the header as it is important that there shall be no condensation as will moisten the web or result in spots thereon.

At the same time the ink is dried without any substantial change in the moisture content of the web. The web may be translated at high speed with complete and effective drying of the print material.

I have illustrated and described my invention in a highly practical embodiment thereof. Cerrain of the parts are shown more or less conventionally and no regard has been made to the proportions of the parts. However, it is believed that this disclosure will enable those skilled in the art to embody or adapt my invention as may be desired.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. In an apparatus of the class described, the combination of walls forming a vacuum chamber provided with a grid face constituting a platen across which a printed web of paper may be translated, means for maintaining a vacuum in said vacuum chamber, other walls forming a chamber for superheated steam disposed above the platen and provided with a plurality of downwardly projecting rib-like nozzle members disposed transversely of and spaced longitudinally of the platen and terminating closely adjacent thereto but in clearing relation to a web of paper translated thereon, said nozzle members each having a plurality of jet passages delivering closely adjacent the web, the nozzle members defining a plurality of elongated steam pockets therebetween extending transversely of the Web and open to the surface thereof, the only communication between the pockets being the spaces between the weband the ends of the nozzles, means for supplying steam to one end of said steam chamber, a series of baffles arranged in said steam chamber to provide zig-zag connected nozzle headers for said nozzle passages, heating elements operatively associated with said nozzle headers, and an exhaust header disposed above the web at the rear of the nozzles with respect to the path of travel of the web and opening closely adjacent to the surface of the web, said exhaust header having a series of baiiies extending transversely of the path of the web and providing a series of passages communicating with a common exhaust.

2. In an apparatus of the class described, the

combination of walls formin a vacuum chamber provided with a grid face constituting a platen across which a printed web of paper may be translated, means for maintaining a vacuum in said vacuum chamber, other walls forming a chamber for superheated steam disposed in facing relationship to the platen and provided with a plurality of projecting rib-like nozzle members disposed transversely of and spaced longitudinally of the platen andterminating closely adjacent thereto but in clearing relation to a web of paper translated thereon, saidnozzle members each having a plurality of jet passages delivering closely adja-' cent the web, the nozzle members defining a plurality of elongated steam pockets there= between extending transversely of the web and open to the surface thereof, the only communicatiorrbetween the pockets being the'spaces between the web and the ends of the nozzles, means for supplying steam to said steam chamber, and anexhaust header disposed at the same side of the web as said nozzles and at the rear of the nozzles with respect to the path of travel of the" web and opening closely adjacent to the surface" of the Web.

3. In an apparatus of the class described, the combination of walls forming a" vacuum chamber provided with a foraminate face constituting a platen across which a printed web'of paper may be translated and comprising a'plu'r'ality of bars of V sectio'n disposed longitudinally of the path or travel of the web and spaced to provide a-longi tudinally slotted grid surface subject to the vacuum of the vacuum chamber, meansfor maintaining a vacuum in said vacuum chamber, other walls forming a chamber for superheated steam disposed above the platen and provided with a plurality of downwardly projecting rib-like nozzle members disposed transversely of and spaced longitudinally of the platen and'terminat ing closely adjacent thereto but in clearing" relation to a web of paper translated thereon, said nozzle members each having a plurality of forwardly directed jet passages delivering closely adjacent the web, the nozzle members defining a p1ura1ity of elongated steam pockets therebetween extending transversely of theweb" and open to the surface thereof, an exhaust header disposed above the web'at the rear of the nozzles with-respect to the path of travel of the web and opening closely adjacent to the surface of the web. 7

4 In an apparatus of the class described, the

combination ofwalls-f-orming a vacuumchamber provided with a ior'a'minate face constituting a platen across-which" a printed webof paper'may betranslate'dy means formaintaining aJ-vac'uuin in said vacuum chamber, other walls forming a chamber for superheated steam disposedi-n facing relationship to the'plat'en and provided with a plurality of projecting rib-like nozzle members disposed transversely of and spaced'longitudinally ot the platen and terminating closely adjacent thereto but in clearing-relation-to a'web of paper translated thereomthenozzle members defininga plurality of elongated steam pockets therebetween extending transversely of the web and open to the surface thereof, aaexhaust header disposed at'the same side-of the web'as said nozzles and at the rear of the nozzles with respect to the path of travel of the web opening closely adj ace'nt to thesur'face 'of' the web.

5; In an apparatus 6 v combination of walls forming" a vacuum chamber provided with a forarniriate-faee' constituting a platen-across whicha printed wet-or paper" may be translated, means for maintainirig a vacuum in said vacuum chamber; other walls for'mirig chamber for superheated steam disposed above the platen and provided with a plurality of-down wardly projecting rib-like nozzle members disposed transversely of and spacedlongitudinally ofthe platenv and terminating closely-adjacenttheretobut in clearing relation to a web of paper translated thereon,,.- the" nozzle member-sf defining g a plurality of elongated steam pockets: there- 75 r the class described; the

betweenextend-ing transversely of the web and open to the surface thereof,- an exhaust header disposed above the web at therear of the nozzles and opening closely adjacent to the surface of the web, said exhaust header having aseries of baflles extending transversely of the path of the web and. defining a series of passages communi'cating with a common exhaust conduit.

6. In an apparatus of the class described, the combination of a steam chamber provided with parallel walls and baffles arranged therein in zig-' zag relation to provide a. series of zig-za' g connected nozzle headers,- oneor said walls having a plurality oftransverse rib-like nozzle members on its outer side; the nozzles having a plurality of bore -like jet passages openingto the nozzle headers, a connection for supplying superheated steam to one of said nozzle headers, electric heat ingunits associated with the otherwalls of said headers in heat transfer relation thereto, means for translating a web or paper closely adjacent. to but out of contact with said nozzles; the web of paper coactingwith said nozzles to definesteam pockets between the nozzles communicat-- ing only through the spaces between the ends of the nozzles and the web of paper, and a suction exhaust header disposed at the rear of the nozzlesv with respect to the path of travel of the web.

7. In an apparatus of the class described, the combination of a steam chamber provided with parallel walls and mules arranged therein in zig-zagrelation to provide a series of zig-zag connectednozzleheaders, the bottom wall having a plurality of transverse rib' like nozzle members on its outer side, the nozzles having a plurality of bore-like jet passages opening to the nozzle headers, a connection for supplying superheated steamto one of said nozzle headers, electric heatingunits associated with the other walls of said headers in heat transfer relation thereto, means for translating a web of paper closely adjacent to but out of contact with said nozzles, the web ofpaper coacting with said nozzles to provide steam pockets between the nozzles communicating only through the spaces between the ends of the nozzles and the web of paper.

8. In an apparatus of the class described, the combination of means for supporting and translating a web of freshly printed; paper, a chamber for superheated steam,- awall; of which is provided with a plurality of nozzle passages terminating closely adjacent to the translated web but in clearing relation thereto, means for supplying steam to said steam chamber, a series of baflies arranged in said steamchamber to provide zigzag connected nozzle headers for said nozzle passages, and heating elements operatively associated with said nozzle headers to maintain the steam in superheated condition as it is delivered to said nozzles.

9. In an apparatus of the class described, the combination of a steam chamber provided with parallel top and. bottoriiwalls allies arranged therein in zig 'zag relation to" provide a series of zig-zagconnected nozzle headers, the'bottom wall combination of a superheated steam chamber provided with a plurality of delivery nozzles, means for translating a web of paper closely adjacent to but out of contact with said nozzles, a housing for said nozzles providing a chamber having a discharge at the rear thereof with respect to the path of travel of the web, the web of paper constituting a closure for one side of said chamber, a foraminated supporting platen across which the web of paper is translated, the platen being subject to vacuum whereby fluttering of the web passing through the nozzle chamber is minimized, and a suction exhaust header disposed at the rear of the nozzle chamber and opening closely adjacent to the web and having a series of inlets extending transversely of the path of the web and communicating with a common exhaust passage whereby a substantially uniform exhaust draft is maintained in the several exhaust header passages.

11. Drying apparatus for setting the ink of printed material on a moving web comprising a steam chamber adapted to discharge superheated steam downwardly and forwardly against said web, means depending around the bottom of said steam chamber forming a heating chamber open to said web, a platen arranged to support said web in closely spaced relationship below said heating chamber, means for applying a vacuum through said platen to the underside of said web to hold said web in a plane surface, and means forming a suction chamber on top of said web and behind said steam chamber with respect to the path of travel of said web, said suction chamher being arranged to evacuate substantially all of the steam issuing from said steam chamber along the surface of said web and against the forwardly directed movement of said steam before said steam has reached a saturated condition.

12. The method of drying printed matter on a moving web of paper which comprises the steps of supporting said web against substantially plane foraminate surfaces by means of a vacuum applied through said surfaces, directing a plurality of superheated steam jets downwardly and forwardly against the incoming printed surface of the supported portion of said web from nozzles positioned closely adjacent thereto and evacuating said steam and the volatile portions of the ink solvent through the space be tween said jets and in the same direction as the path of travel of the web before said steam has cooled below a superheated state.

13. The method of drying printed matter on a moving web of paper which comprises holding said web in a substantially plane position by means of a vacuum, directing a plurality of longitudinally and transversely spaced superheated steam jets closely adjacent and downwardly and forwardly against the incoming printed surface of said web and evacuating said steam and the volatile portions of the ink solvent from along the surface of said web in the same direction as the path of travel of the web before said steam has cooled below a superheated state.

14. The method of drying printed matter on a moving web of paper which comprises holding said web in a substantially fixed position normally with respect to its path of movement by means of a vacuum, directing superheated steam forwardly against the incoming printed surface of said web and evacuating said steam and the volatile portions of the ink solvent rearwardly from along the surface of said web before said steam has cooled below a superheated state.

15. In an apparatus of the class described, the combination of means for translating a web of freshly printed material and directly supporting a substantial length. thereof, said means for supporting said web including a vacuum chamber with a foraminate wall across which the web is translated and adapted when subjected to vacuum to hold said web thereagainst, a chamber adapted to be supplied with superheated steam, a wall of which is provided with a plurality of rib-like nozzle members disposed transversely of and spaced longitudinally along the path of travel of the web and terminating between .0012 and .008 inches from the web where it is supported by said foraminate wall, said nozzle members each having a plurality of forwardly directed jet passages delivering through its edge adjacent the web, the nozzle members forming a plurality of elongated steam pockets extending transversely of the web and open to the surface thereof, the only communication between the pockets being the spaces between the web and the edges of the nozzles, and walls forming an exhaust chamber at the rear of said steam chamber with respect to the movement of said web and communicating with the rearmost of said pockets.

16. In an apparatus of the class described, the combination of means for translating a web of freshly printed material and directly supporting a substantial length thereof, said means for supporting said web including a vacuum chamber with a foraminate wall across which the web is translated and adapted when subjected to vacuum to hold said web thereagainst, a chamber adapted to be supplied with superheated steam and having a plurality of transverse rib-like nozzle members disposed transversely across and spaced longitudinally of the supported portion of the web, the nozzle members having a plurality of jet passages delivering from the steam chamber to the face of the web, the web of paper coacting with said nozzle members to form steam pockets between the nozzle members communicating only through the spaces between the edges of the nozzles and the web, the spaces between said nozzles and the web being between .0012 and .008 inch wide, and a suction header disposed at the rear of said steam chamber with respect to the movement of said web and communicating with the rearmost of said pockets.

17. In an apparatus of the class described, the combination of walls forming a steam chamber and provided with a plurality of nozzles distributed over one of its walls, other walls forming a housing around said one wall and nozzles and forming a drying chamber, means for translating a web of paper closely adjacent to but out of contact with said other walls and said nozzles, the web of paper constituting a substantial closure for one side of said drying chamber, a foraminate supporting platen across which the web of paper is translated and forming a backing for that portion of the web facing said drying chamber, walls forming a vacuum chamber across the back of said platen, means for creating a vacuum in said vacuum chamber whereby fluttering of the web passing across said platen and heating chamber is minimized, and other walls forming a suction header disposed where the web issues at the rear of said drying chamber and opening closely adjacent to the web.

18. Drying apparatus for setting the ink of printed material on a moving web comprising, a steam chamber having nozzles adapted to discharge superheated steam against said web, means projecting around the periphery of said steam chamber and forming a drying chamber surrounding said nozzles and open to said web, a foraminate platen arranged to support said web in closely spaced but non-touching relationship with said projecting means and nozzles along the open side of said drying chamber, means for applying a vacuum through said platen to the back surface of said web to hold said web against fluttering, and means forming a suction chamber opening to the printed side of said web behind said steam chamber with respect to the path of travel of said web.

JOSEPH R. GILLIS.

REFERENCES CITED UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Yetter Aug. 12, 1924 Number 10 Number Name Date 1,560,579 Jones Nov. 10, 1925 1,830,287 Ohlin Nov. 3, 1931 2,010,917 DuPont Aug. 13, 1935 2,038,457 Venturini Apr. 21, 1936 2,060,430 Spooner Nov. 10, 1936 2,065,032 Spooner Dec. 22, 1936 2,119,261 Andrews May 31, 1938 2,183,298 Ofien Dec. 12, 1939 2,225,505 Often Dec. 17, 1940 2,298,803 Morris Oct. 13, 1942 2,376,339 Wansker May 22, 1945 2,389,586 Andrews Nov. 2'7, 1945 2,413,409 Fitchett et a1 Dec. 31, 1946 2,420,739 Dorsch May 20, 1947 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 257,449 Great Britain Sept. 2, 1926 547,339 Great Britain Aug. 24, 1942 OTHER REFERENCES Ser. No. 262,245, Fischer (A. P. C.), published April 27, 1943; application abandoned.

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Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification34/465, 101/416.1
International ClassificationB41F23/00, B41F23/04
Cooperative ClassificationB41F23/0433
European ClassificationB41F23/04B6D