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Publication numberUS2629602 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 24, 1953
Filing dateJul 28, 1948
Priority dateJul 28, 1948
Publication numberUS 2629602 A, US 2629602A, US-A-2629602, US2629602 A, US2629602A
InventorsBach Leonard Arnold, Bach William Einar
Original AssigneeBach Leonard Arnold, Bach William Einar
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Racing game scorekeeping device
US 2629602 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 24, 1953 1 A. BACH ET Al.

RACING GAME SCOREKEEPING DEVICE 2 SHEETS-SHEET l Filed July 28, 1948 Feb. 24, 1953 L. A. BACH ErAL Y 2,629,502

i RACING GAME SCOREKEEPING DEVICE Filed July 28, 1948 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 Patented Feb. 24, 1953 RACING GAME SGOREKEEPING. DEVICE LeonardArnold Bach and William Einar Bach, Chicago, Ill.

Application July 28', 1948Seria1 No. 41,086

4 claims. 1

This invention is directed to a new and novel game, which is played for amusement. However, coincident with its use as a game, our novel in- Vention may be used in a variety of manners to demonstrate, in an effective manner, the opera-V tion of. the law of probability.

One of, ther objects of this invention is to provide a game for amusement which, because of the variety of colorful pieces which may be used in playing: the gama. vvill` attract and hold interest.

It is` a further objectof our invention to provide, in a game, a. series of reference or record cards reference to which will disclose the relative probability ofv each colorful indicator or racer to. win any given race, said reference carol having thereon avr series of numbers predetermined by a mathematical law.

Other and further objects of our invention will be apparent from the following description and appended claims.

One embodiment of` our invention is demonstrated in the accompanying drawings bearing the numbers of reference referred to in the accompanying specication.

On the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a top plan viewI of one form of our invention with fragmentary portions thereof completed.

Fig., 2r is a` sectional view taken substantially on the line 2 2 Aofleig.. .1.

Fig, 3 is anenlarged top detail view of a section ofy the track, taken in the. area oi the starting line.

Fig. 4 is a .sectional view taken substantially on the line 4 4 of Fig.v 3.

Fig. 5 is a planview of one face 'of the record board.

Fig. 6 is a sectional view takensubstantially on the line 6--6 of Fig. `5.

Fig. 7 is a view looking at the side edge vof Fig. 5 having a slot therein for removably retaining` the numbered cards.

Fig. 8 is an elevational View of one of the modified numbered cards.

Fig. 9 is a plan view of the face opposite that seenin Fig. 5 after one race has been won.

Fig. 10 is one illustration .of the shapes which the racer may assume.

Referring to the drawings, numeral l0 represents a suitable base or supporting element such as a table top, which is supported by legs or any other suitable supporting members` (not shown). Preferably Yintegral with the. base van elongated circular or ovalescent' endless lpath or track surface or track Il is defined by means of an inner limiting rail or fence I2 yand an outer limiting rail or fence I3.

The inner limiting fence i2 is preferably an endless fence preferably disposing itself in the shape of an oval and inwardly and centrally of which is denned an ovate area lll. rlhe inner rail or fence I2 is preferably disposed concentrically from the outer fence or rail l3,.said fence i3 being also preferably endless and disposed in the conguration of an oval.

rThe inner rail l2 is elevated fromV the base iii by a plurality of preferably uniform and preferably equally spaced apart pegs, posts, or support members l5 which are disposed in a path beneath or under the rail l2. Said rail I2 is securely and rigidly mounted on the top of said posts, Said posts i6, at the lowermost end thereof are secured to the top of theV supporting element lll in any appropriate manner.

rlhe outer rail I3 is elevated from the base It, and by means or" posts, pegs, or other support members l5, to the upper ends of which said rail i3 is secured, said rail i3 being securely and rigidly held in the proper position. The posts i5 are preferably uniformly spaced in a path beneath the rail i3, each of said posts at the lowermost end thereof beingy rigidly .secured to thev top of the supporting basev l0 inan appropriate manner, such as gluing said lowermost ends into appropriately positioned apertures, not shown, in the base l0.

The area i4 may optionally be used as the playing area or place in which the dice or other appropriate bodiesr are cast. (One method of play is to be hereinafter described.) The area, if used in said manner, may be optionally covered with an appropriate material such as. felt.

In one embodiment of our game, 6 courses or paths il, i8, le, 2%, 2l, and 2K2 are preferably concentrically placed respectively between the inner fence I2 andv the outer fence i3 so that the inner course or path ll is of a lesser length than the adjacent path I-, and the outer path 22 is longer than Ythe adjacent path or course 2l, and so on, each progressively outer course being of greater lengthy than the adjacent inner cou-rse and each progressing inward course being of :a lesser length than the adjacent outer course. It is preferable that all of the courses vary vin length from the respective adjacent courses by substantially a common linear factor. Thus, the track ll will be provided with substantially equally spaced apart courses. 'it' isnot necessary. however, that the courses or the `track be ovales cent and endless, nor is it necessary that the courses be of varying lengths. For example, the same may be straight or arcuate. To clearly mark each of the courses and differentiate them from the other courses, it is preferable that each course be indicated and marked for the entire length thereof with a distinguishing color or indicia.

Each course has a plurality of preferably equally spaced apart apertures or holes 23, respectively, as illustrated in Figs. l and 3. The distance between the apertures 23 in course I1 is substantially the same as the distance between the apertures 23 in course I8, the distance between adjacent apertures 23 in any given course being substantially the same as the distance between the apertures 23 of any other course. Consequently, because the courses are of varying lengths and have substantially equally spaced apart apertures, each course has a different number of apertures. Course I'I has for example, forty-four apertures 23, course I8 has for example, forty-seven aper-tures 23, and so on, each course having, for example, three more apertures therein than the course inwardly adjacent thereto so that course 22 has for example, fifty-nine apertures 23 therein. As illustrated in Figs. l and 3 each hole or aperture 23 is marked with an adjacent numer-al 214 in any suitable position, to enable the progress of the game to ibe easily evident, said numerals 24 progressing from 1 to the largest number of apertures in a given course, each aperture in any given course bearing the numeral corresponding to the number of apertures said aperture is from the starting line 25. Consequently, the numeral l in any course would indicate that the aperture is the first removed from the starting line 25, and a numeral, for example, 27 in any course would indicate that the aperture adjacent thereto is twentyseven apertures from said starting line.

The starting line 25 may be arbitrarily placed but it is preferable that it be well marked, for example, with a black line. In the herein described embodiment of our invention, we employ the line 25 as both a starting line and a finish line. The apertures 23 in each course forwardly adjacent said line 25 are marked with a numeral I, and those apertures 23 which are rearwardly adjacent said starting Iline are marked with a numeral 24 corresponding to the highest number of apertures in said given course.

Along the starting line, and positioned in the track in each of said courses I1, I8, I9, 20, 2I, and 22 is an aperture or hole 26 which is preferably of a diameter smaller than that of the apertures 23. Adjacent preferably every third aperture 23 rearwardly from the line 25, in each of the courses I1, I8, I9, 20, 2I, and 22 is an aperture or hole 21 which is preferably smaller than the apertureZS. Said apertures 21, are preferably numbered consecutively from the numeral 1 rearwardly from the starting line 25, said numerals being preferably encircled, as illustrated at 3l, to distinguish said numerals 3l from the numerals 24 which mark the apertures 23,

The apertures 23 releasably retain the manually movable pieces or objects 28 which are the objects Ior elements which race against each other. The apertures 26 provide the means for releasably retaining the pegged starting gates 29, and the apertures 21 provide the means for releasably retaining the handicap markers 3U.

It is to be observed that the apertures 23 need not be spaced equally apart; however, the number of apertures in each course, said number of apertures representing the distance which each racing object 28 in a given course will travel, varies in accordance with a predetermined mathematical law.

As illustrated in Figs. 1, 3, and 4, numeral 29 represents the starting gates. Integral with each of said gates is a downwardly extending shank or post 32 which is adapted to be rigidly releasably retained in the apertures 2B. When it is in position, each of the gates 29 is preferably disposed at a right angle to its respective course I1, I8, I9,20,2I,and22.

As illustrated in Fig. 3, each of the handicap markers 38 may be releasably and rigidly mounted in any of the apertures 21 by means of a downwardly extending slidable shank or post 33 which is integral with each of the respective handicap markers 30. There is preferably one handicap marker for each course.

As illustrated in Figs. 1 and 3, there are preferably six racers or racing objects or members or racing pieces 28. Each of said racers 28 will race on one course or path. Preferably each racer 28 is colored or indicated in a sufficient manner to make it easily apparent on which of the course I1, I8, I9, 20, 2|, or 22 said racing piece will race. Said racing pieces are preferably mounted on van integral downwardly extending shank or post 34, which is adapted to be rigidly but releasably retained in the apertures 23. To make the game more colorful, the racing object or pieces 28 are preferably shaped to sim-ulate a ligure, such as a mounted horse, as illustrated in Fig. 10, or a fish, or dog. To provide the proper color to the game, it is preferable to provide `the proper environment. So, if the racers are fish, the track II should be made to simulate a pool, and the dice or other polyhedral bodies which are cast (to be hereinafter described) should be made to simulate pebbles. The area I4 should also be used to appropriately supply the pro-per elements of environment and color.

Referring to Figs. 5, 6, 8, and 9, numeral 35 represents a vertical or upright member 35 or record board with an appropriate preferably integral base 36. A series of elongated vertical-ly extending slots 31 are horizontally spaced in said member 35, as illustrated in Figs. 5 and 9, one of said slots 31 corresponding to each of the courses I1, I8, I9, 20, 2I, and 2,2. A series of apertures or slots 38, are vertically disposed in a plane normal to the plane of the member 35 toward one lateral edge 33 of the member 35, said apertures being substantially equally spaced apart, as illustrated in Figs. 5 and 9.

The lateral edge 39 has a vertical slit or slot 40 therein which extends centrally to the central edge of the apertures 38. As illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6, the portion of the lateral edge 39 along one face of the slot 4! is preferably recessed. Said combination adapts said member 35 to releasalbly retain any one of a ser-ies of cards or thin members 4I between the faces of the upright member 35.

Numbers 42, the purpose of which will be hereafter described, are marked on each face of said card 4I so that said numbers are visible through the apertures 38. The cards 4I are of an adequate and appropriate size to snugly fit in the slot 40 without slipping out.

A slidable member or block 43 is positioned in each of the slots 31. Each of said members 43 is adapted to be frictionally retained by means maar 1 of'a 'flange 44 on `each end thereofgsaid-ang-es normally frictionally abutting the respective faces of said member 35, as-illustrated in Figsf, 6, '7, and 9. Each'ilangeof eachmem-ber 43 is preferably appropriately marked to correspond to the one of thecourseswliich said-slot 31 represents.

lt is to be understood that the lengths of the slots '3l are preferably-graduated inversely proportionately to the length of the course (number of apertures 23) which it represents, so that the slot representing the shortest course is longest and lthat representing the longest course -22 is shortest. lPreferably .adjacent Y'each olf the slots V3l is a row of vertically disposed suocessively downwardly increasing numbers 45 which-correspond to `the Anumber of races which have been won oneachY course. Said numbers -4-5 are preferably in substantially horizontal alignment 'with the vertically disposed apertures 3-8. Said arrangement results in the no races won on any course with an in horizontal alignment with the highest of the apertures 38 for course I"|, and an "0 in horizontal faligmnent with the sixth highest aperture 38 for course 22, and respective 0 s in alignment with r`the respective intermediate apertures for the intermediate courses Vnesp-ectively as illustrated in Figs. 5 Vand 9. The numbers `45-are preferably positioned, as described, on both faces of the upright member 35.

As illustrated in Figs. 5 and 9, preferably each of the members 4.3, on each flange i4 thereof, has an arrow 415 adjacent each of the numbers on said anges. Said arrows indicate the number of races which have been won on the respective courses for which said arrclws act as 'indicators, said arrowsbeing Icapable of `being horizcntally aligned with respect to the respective numbers 45 and the apertures -38.

As illustrated in Figs. '5, 7, and 9, there area plurality of cards withnumbers 42` thereon, said numbers being vertically disposed on both faces of said cards, so that when any of said :cards 4| is inserted into the slot '40 in the uprightmember 35, e-achof said numbers `:12 mayibe seen through one of the apertures 38. The numbers 42 von'each of the cards 4| indicate the probability of any of the respectiveracing'members 2B of winning the race. `Said numbers 42 are preferably computed by using aformul'abased upon thelaw of prob abilities.

It will'be apparent .that innumerable variations of the-methodoi play are possible, andthat the rules for playing may be greatly modified without kdeparting 'from the concepts herein embraced. VIt should be under-stood that we anticipate these modifications.

We shall now describe one preferable method of play. Preferably six dice (not shovwn) are used. However, any polyhedral bodies or their equivalents maybe used, and. any number of dice may be used. Preferably one of the dice is a multiplyingdie, the remaining live being indicator dice. If the game played employs v six racing members 23, the numbers on Itheiive indicator dicel-will-be used to designate which of the racers is to move, each of the six numbers on the dice representing a ldilerent racing mem-ber 28. The number of times any single numeral'appearsrin a'given cast or thro-w of the dice is multiplied by the number appearing on the multiplying die, and thefracer zpwhiich said number of the indicator dice represents, is movedforward a corresponding -number f of Lapertures*24| from that aperture in'whichsad'racer isfpresently positioncd.

vIn the 'one 'method 4of Iplay wefhave chosen to describe,.a given racer 28 will not be permitted to move forward unless the number which rcpresents saidracer appears atleast twice in any given cast of the dice, or-unless the number representing said racer is the only absent number in an arithmetic progression of numbers in which the number corresponding to all of the other racers'Z is present. For example, if the diceare cast and a "5appears on the multiplyingdie, and the numbers 4," 4, 4; .2, and -5 appear on the indicator dice, .the racer 2-8 Irepresented bythe numeral "4" lwill move 3 5or 15 apertures in the respective course, land none of the other racers will move; or if` the dice are cast and a` 6 appears on the multiplying die, andthe numerals1, 3, 4, 5, and 6`appear on the indicator dice, vonly the racer representedby the missing numeral 2 will move 6 apertures forward on the respective course. In this manner the dice are cast and recast until one of the racers has completed its respective course land becomes the winner.

It should be observed'that if the herein `described method of play is used, the probability of Vany racer 28 of winning a race'would be the same as that of any other if the respective course which each of said racers were to run was the same length. However, .by varying the `lengths of the courses according .to a predetermined mathematical. law, theiprobabilityof .each of said racers winning will vary accordingly.

As the game is begun, an appropriate card 14| is put into the slot 40. Each of the racers 28 is behind the starting line 25 on its respective course. Each of the members 43 is positioned so that the arrows 46 point to the fO or no races won iig-ure 45 for its respective course, as illustrated in Fig. 5. A handicap marker 30 is placed in the aperture 21 indicating lthe initial starting position on each course. Just before .the rst race begins the starting gates 29 are removed. Then, the dice are cast .and movement ofthe racers occursas described.

Forthe purpose of illustration, -assuming the racer 28 on course I9 finished the race first, the probability of his winning may be determined by reading in the aperture 32 Whichis third from the top, and which isindicated by thearrow -46 on` the flanges 44 of the member 43.representing said racer 28.

For the nextfrace, the racer-28 on track I9, having won, must.now be handicapped. The handicap marker 30 representing the .racer 28 on course I9 will bemoved backward .to vthe next rearward aperture 21 for said marker so that said racer will now begin the new race with, for example, a distance of three more apertures 23 to travel in order to win. Since the courses preferably vary in length by three apertures, the probability of the raceron course I9 winning will be the same as for the racer 28 .on the next longestcourse 20.

Before the startof .the second race a different card 4I replaces the card 4|, inthe slot 40, which was used for the prior race. Because kof the change in thedistance each racer will have to go to win with respect to-all of the others, the new card `4| for the second race will express the new probability of winning. For the second race the member43 representing theracer'on course I9 willbe 'moved downfso` that the '-arrowr4`6-wi1l indicate one race won as illustrated iin IFig. 1,9.

The racer 28 on any given course which wins a race will preferably begin the next following race from a position 3 aperture 23 .behind the aperture from which said racer began the race it Won. Also each time a, race is won by any given racer the slidable member representing the course on which the race is won will be moved down to indicate one additional race won on the respective course.

It is to be observed that the ratios and probabilities of winning changes after each race and an appropriate card 4| is preferably made up for each race in a game. Regardless of the racer which has won the prior race, the card for the followingrace will preferably be the same.

It should be noted that because of the method of handicapping used, all the gates 29 are preierably not removed at the start of any race eX- cept for the rst in a series. Rather, the gates 29 are removed from the respective courses as the racer 28 on any of said courses reaches the starting line for the first time in the current race. This method will avoid confusion concerning which handicapped racers have not yet reached the starting line 25 from the handicapped position, and which are reaching the line 25 in completing the race.

The present invention has been described herein more or less as to details; yet it is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited thereby, as changes may be made in the arrangement and proportion of parts and equivalents may be substituted without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

We claim:

1. In a score keeping device for use with a racing game having a plurality ci racing courses and having a plurality of racers adapted to race on each of said courses respectively, the lengths of said courses being unequal and established in accordance with some selected mathematical law, a record board adapted to record the number of races of a given series, which are won on each of said courses, said record board having a plurality of parallel vertical slots spaced horizontally, the lengths of said slots ranging accordingto said mathematical law, a, plurality of slidable blocks, each of said blocks being adapted to be manually moved in a respective vertical slot, each of said slots and said block therein representing one of said courses respectively, said board having indicia representing the number of races won, arranged vertically adjacent each of said slots, said blocks being alignable with said indicia to indicate the number of races in a given series of races which have been won on the course represented by said block, said board having a plurality of vertically disposed apertures, a series of indicia bearing members, said board being adapted to releasably retain any one of said indicia bearing members, each of said members having a vertical column of numbers, each of said numbers being adapted to be visible when one of said indicia bearing members is appropriately positioned in said record board, each of said numbers being an expression of the probability of winning on one of said courses, each of said blocks being adapted to indicate to which number on said indicia bearing members reference is to be made to determine the probability of winning a race by the racer represented by the lblocks respectively.

2. In a scoring means adapted for use with a racing game in which the racing elements must travel different distances and in which the distance which the racing element winning the previous race must travel with respect to others changes after each race of a series, a plurality of indicia bearing members, each of said members having inscribed on both faces thereof a mathematical expression of the probability of success of a particular racing element to win in relation to all the other racing elements collectively, an apertured upright member provided with means for releasably retaining any one of said members, said numerical expressions being visible from opposite sides of said upright member through the apertures formed therein, said upright member having a plurality of vertical slots, a plurality of slidable members, each of said slidable members representing a respective racing element racing on a particular course, each of said slidable members being receivable in a respective vertical slot and being adapted to frictionally engage said upright member to be maintained in any vertical position in its respective slot, resistently to gravity, but yieldingly to force, a numerical character formed, on each end of each slidable member corresponding to the number of a particular course, whereby the probability of winning a race by any racing element, in a given race of a series of races wherein the relative distance which said racing element is to travel to win said given race changes with respect to the distance to be traveled by the racing element winning the previous race of said series, can at any period be symbolically indicated by moving the particular slidable member into alignment with an appropriate aperture.

3. In a scoring means adapted for use with a racing game in which the racing elements must travel different distances and in which the distance which each racing element must travel with respect to the winning racing element of the previous race changes after each race, an upright member provided with a vertically disposed slit formed in one side thereof, said member having a plurality of apertures formed therein normal to the plane thereof and on the same side of the member as said slit, a plurality of thin members, each of which is adapted to be inserted into said slit and be securely and visibly positioned therein within the planes of one of said apertures, each of said members having inscribed on both faces thereof a mathematical expression of the probability of success of a particular racing element in relation to all the other racing elements collectively, said upright member being provided with a plurality of longitudinal slots, a plurality of slidable members, each of which is receivable in a respective longitudinal slot and being adapted to frictionally engage the upright member whereby said slidable member can be maintained in any desired longitudinal position in its respective slot, resistently to gravity but yieldably to manual force, a numerical character formed on each end of each slidable member corresponding to the number of a particular course, whereby the probability of winning a race by any racing element, in a given race of a series of races wherein the relative distance which said racing element is to travel to win said given race changes with respect to the distance to be traveled by the racing element winning the previous race of the series, can at any period be symbolically indicated by moving the particular slidable member into alignment with an appropriate one of said apertures. i

4. In a scoring means adapted for use with a 9 racing game in which the racing elements must travel different distances and in which the distance which each racing element must travel with respect to the winning racing element of the previous race changes after each race, a record board, means on said board for indicating the number of races Won by each of said racing elements in a given series of races, a plurality of thin indicia bearing members, each of said members being adapted to be individually releasably retained in said board, said indicia bearing members having a series of numbers thereon, said means for indicating the number of races won adapted to cooperate with said indicia bearing members to indicate the relative probability of Winning by any of said racers, said record board having a plurality of elongated parallel vertical slots spaced horizontally and a series of vertically extending slots, said means including indicia representing the number of races won arranged adjacent each of said elongated slots on said board and a plurality of slidable blocks adapted to be moved in said elongated slots and being alignable with said indicia on said board, said vertically extending slots being adapted to render visible said numbers of said indicia bearing members, said blocks each 10 representing a particular racing element and bing alignable with said indicia on said board adjacent said slots to indicate the number of races won by its associated racing element, in

5 a given series of races.

LEONARD ARNOLD BACH. WILLIAM EINAR BACH.

10 REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS 5 Number Name Date 780,937 Clagett Jan. 24, 1905 1,145,211 Pine July 6, 1915 1,290,988 Hawxhurst Jan. 14, 1919 1,445,586 Gunnlaugsson Feb. 13, 1923 20 1,660,501 Gleason Feb. 28, 1928 1,797,742 Ward Mar. 24, 1931 2,299,284 Steidemann Oct. 20, 1942 2,546,347 Rengel Mar. 27, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 548,977 Great Britain Nov. 2, 1942

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US780937 *Dec 3, 1903Jan 24, 1905Clagett CompanyGame apparatus.
US1145211 *Apr 24, 1914Jul 6, 1915Clarence E PineScorer for auction-pinochle.
US1290988 *Oct 23, 1916Jan 14, 1919Clarence O HawxhurstIndicator.
US1445586 *Jan 24, 1921Feb 13, 1923Skuli GunnlaugssonCounting board
US1660501 *Sep 3, 1927Feb 28, 1928Rowena S GleasonEducational game apparatus
US1797742 *Dec 6, 1929Mar 24, 1931Ward F HughGame
US2299284 *Dec 11, 1939Oct 20, 1942Edward H SteidemannMarket quotation board
US2546347 *Jun 6, 1947Mar 27, 1951Rengel VictorGame board for simulated racing
GB548977A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3473802 *Oct 10, 1966Oct 21, 1969Kaiser Aluminium Chem CorpApparatus for playing a game involving forecasting of future events
US5149101 *Nov 25, 1991Sep 22, 1992Mazza Peter AHorse race game apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/148.00R, 273/246, 116/222, 235/124
International ClassificationA63F9/14, A63F11/00, A63F9/00, A63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00082, A63F11/0051, A63F3/00006, A63F9/14
European ClassificationA63F3/00A10, A63F9/14