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Publication numberUS2630012 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 3, 1953
Filing dateOct 22, 1946
Priority dateOct 22, 1946
Publication numberUS 2630012 A, US 2630012A, US-A-2630012, US2630012 A, US2630012A
InventorsJohn Walker
Original AssigneeJohn Walker
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club velocity indicating device
US 2630012 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 3, 1953 J. WALKER 2,630,012

GOLF CLUB VELOCITY INDICATING DEVICE Filed Oct. 22, 1946 INVENTOR.

Patented Mar. 3, 1953 UNITED-y STATES PATENT OFFICE GOLF CLUBVELOCITY INDIOATINGLDEVICET John Walker, Alameda, Calif. l

Application O'ctoberZZ, 1946,",Serial No; 704,828 (c1. .ra-ara) ii-Claims. 1

This invention relates to devices for timing the swingofa golf club and has for its principal object theprovision ofa device thatwill enable a person to ascertain the comparative velocities of a golf club head when a number of swings are made.

Another object of my invention is the provision of adevice that 'is relatively small as compared to a standard. golf club, and is also of negligible Weight:

A'further object of theinvention-is theprovision of a device; as described, that will be'economical to manufacture, and one that canb'e used by either right-handed orleft-handed olfers.

It is 'a well established fact that theswing that propels a golf ball the maximum distance, has for its main characteristic the attainment of maximum club head speed at the moment of impact with" the ball; Acquiringsuch a sw'ing calls for ahigh degreeof mu'scular coordination,

involving body movement, arm movement, and

wrist action, and is commonly referred to as timing. The great majority of would-be golfers are prone to exert'all their eifortb'efore the club head reaches what is known as the hitting area, and consequently the force applied "is wasted-,-and the desired-'club:head.:speed is neverrrealized.

My device will enable a person to swing a. golf club. a: number of times, and'by checking the indicator each time, determine 'just how to swing a club in ordertoiattain.maximum club head speed.

The 1 mode of obtaining the. aforesaid results will become apparent during the course of the following description, and appended claims taken in connection with the accompanying drawing forming a part hereof.

In the drawing:

Figure 1 is an illustration of the driving end of a gOlf club, the line of sight being perpendicular to the shaft, and showing my device clipped in place on the shaft.

Figure 2 is an elevation of an embodiment of my device, the extent of the travel of the swinging arm being indicated in phantom.

Figure 3 is an end elevation of the device as shown in Figure 2 viewed from line 3-3. The swinging arm being shown in the retracted position and the adjustable weight being omitted.

Figure 4 is a modified design of the rotatable wedge incorporating the spring characteristics in its construction.

Figure 5 is a sectional elevation through the center of the device showing the modified construction.

Referring to the drawing in detail, a supporting structure in the form of a bracket member I, preferably stamped or punched out, and made of thin gauge sheet spring steel is provided with a 2 pair of aligned hooks or clips 2 adaptedto clip onto theshaft ofa standard golf club as indicateddn-Fi'gure 1. The center portion of the bracket memberl isformed into a substantially channel shapedsection-comprising an upstanding front wallG enda-relatively shorter but wider back wallli- Walls3 'and thave stamped therein, depressions-tracingone-another and in axial-alignment, and adapted "to form centers for pivot pin 6. Pintis of such-a length that it-can be forced into position between the resilient walls 3 and 4, and when in place, isfi'eeto turn Without any looseness.

'Fixedly mounted on the pivot pin 6, and adaptedto rotate "therewith; is'a wedge, shown as a'wedge'shaped disc I which is disposed between a pair of opposing'cantilever leaf springs 8, punched out ofthe walls 3 and 4. Wedge Tis provided with a threaded hole 9 located centrally with reference. to thesides of the disc, and extending generally radially from the rim to the center.. The tappedlholefl is more specifically described as being; located'in the only parallel diametrical transverse plane of the disc or perpendicular tothe planewhich cuts the disc at its greatest and smallest thicknesses.

Engaging the tapped hole 9 is a threaded arm I!) which'acts as a set screw by being tightened to seat on pin'and constitutes a swinging arm with an adjustable weight H. The adjustable weight ll .15 tapped-to engage the threaded arm ID, and is adaptedtochange thecenter of gravity ofathe. pivotal assemblyby a change of its position on the arm I01 Extending outwardly from the back wall 4, across the path of the swinging arm ID, are a pair of stops l2 so located as to limit the travel of the swinging arm I!) to degrees as shown on Figure 2.

When the arm I0 is in the position as shown at A on Figure 2 the thinnest section of the wedge I is located between springs 8 which in this position exert a negligible pressure. As the wedge I is rotated, the springs 8 are forced apart until they reach a maximum upon the arm ID reaching position B on Figure 2. It will be apparent that a progressively increasing force is expended in rotating the assembly from position A to position B.

The front wall 3 terminates at its upper end in a semi-circle which is concentric with the center point 5, and the border of the semicircular portion is marked with a number of graduations 13. A pointer I4 secured to disc 1 by the arm I0 and nut I5, is adapted to register with the graduations 13.

With reference to Figures 4 and 5, the modified disc I5 has the same general wedge shape as disc 1, but is formed of sheet metal, preferably spring steel, and it will therefore resist any effort to turn it between the fixed projections 17, simulating the effect of the combination of disc 7 and springs 8.

Pivot pin l8 passes loosely through holes [9 in disc [6, but fits tightly in the hole through the arm 20.

Pointer 2| is secured in place on the disc l6 by nuts 22 and. 23.

In operation, the device is clipped onto the shaft of a standard golf club, and the club is then swung. The centrifugal force imparted to the swinging arm of the device by the motion of the club, will cause it to swing from the position A to a point approaching position B. By observing the position of the indicator with each successive swing, the swinger of the club is enabled to determine for himself the most efficient method.

Should the arm swing through its entire travel, this can be corrected by means of the adjustable weight, for, by advancing it toward the center of pivot, the radius of gyration is shortened, and the travel of the arm will be accordingly restricted.

In order to adapt the device to suit a left handed person, it is only necessary to snap the rotatable assembly out of place, reverse it and replace it. Position A then becomes position B and vice versa.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that I have provided an extremely useful device of the character described, one which is verycompact and which can be cheaply manufactured. While I havedisclosed a preferred embodiment of my invention, it will be understood that modifications may be made within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A swing velocity indicator for golf clubs, comprising a supporting structure designed for attachment to the shaft of the club, a wedge pivotally mounted on said structure, and having a weighted rod extending generally outwardly from the pivotal axis of the wedge, an inwardly projecting member carried by said supporting structure and having a portion in frictional contact with the inclined face of said wedge, said member being yieldably urged toward the wedge, and an indicator actuated by said wedge.

2. A swing velocity indicator for golf clubs, comprising a supporting structure designed for attachment to the shank of a golf club, a member pivoted on said structure, said member having at least one face inclined, a Weighted arm attached to said member and extending generally outwardly from the pivotal axis thereof, a spring carried by the supporting structure, and having one end urged against the inclined face of said member, and indicator means to register movement of said arm.

3. A swing velocity indicator for golf clubs, comprising a structure designed for attachment to the shank of a golf club, a member pivotally mounted on said structure, an arm connected to said member and extending generally outwardly from the pivotal axis thereof for pivotally displacing said member in response to the velocity of the swing of the club, said member including at least one resilient cam surface movable therewith, a projection mounted on said supporting structure and contacting said cam surface to effect displacement thereof upon movement of said member, and an indicator adapted to register movement of said arm.

4. A swing velocity indicator for golf clubs, comprising a supporting structure designed for attachment to the shank of a golf club, a member pivoted on said structure, an arm connected to said member and extending generally outwardly from the pivotal axis thereof for pivotally displacing said member in response to the velocity of the swing of the club, said member including at least one cam surface movable therewith, a projection mounted on said supporting structure and having a surface contacting said cam surface, at least one of said surfaces being resiliently displaceable upon movement of said member, and an indicator adapted to register movement of said arm.

JOHN WALKER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,712,609 Gibson May 14, 1929 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 179,079 Great Britain May 4, 1922

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1712609 *Sep 28, 1927May 14, 1929Gibson JamesStroke-indicating attachment for golf clubs
GB179079A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2986937 *May 14, 1956Jun 6, 1961Loyal H ChapmanLineal yardage meter attachment for golf clubs
US3848873 *Mar 26, 1974Nov 19, 1974Linning DIndicators for indicating accelerations in sports equipment which are swung in use
US4040631 *Jun 22, 1976Aug 9, 1977Flippin Jarvis FGolf club swing guide
US4163552 *Mar 16, 1978Aug 7, 1979Marian TisoApparatus for facilitating the practicing of tennis and like games
US4204332 *Jul 31, 1978May 27, 1980Gray Lewis LGolf aid
US4819941 *Jul 24, 1987Apr 11, 1989Tanaka Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Device for determining swing speed of rotatable implements
US5131660 *Dec 14, 1990Jul 21, 1992Joseph MaroccoPutter
US5259620 *Jan 22, 1992Nov 9, 1993Joseph MaroccoGold club training device
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/233
International ClassificationG01P3/02, G01P3/16
Cooperative ClassificationG01P3/16
European ClassificationG01P3/16