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Publication numberUS2630248 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 3, 1953
Filing dateOct 8, 1948
Priority dateOct 8, 1948
Publication numberUS 2630248 A, US 2630248A, US-A-2630248, US2630248 A, US2630248A
InventorsTheodore A Hinz
Original AssigneeDirkes Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pump for dispensing fluid substances from containers
US 2630248 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 3, 1953 r. A. HINZ 2,630,243

PUMP FOR DISPENSING FLUID SUBSTANCES FROM CONTAINERS Filed Oct. 8, 1948 2 SHEETS-SHEET l INVEN'TQR. Theodore A. Hm

ATTORNEYS.

Patented Mar. 3, 1953.

UNITED STATES ATENT OFFICE PUMP FOR DISPENSING FLUID SUBSTANCES FRQM CONTAINERS Application October 8, 1948, Serial No. 53,515

Claims.

This invention relates to the handlin and dispensing of fluid or semi-fluid substances and it has to do particularly with an apparatus for discharging such substances in a controlled manner from the containers or drums.

Various kinds of flowable substances of varying viscosities are ordinarily placed in drums for transportation to the place of use. Such substances include oils and greases or other lubricants, sealing substances to be applied to cracks or the like, weather strip adhesives, material for sealing window glass, sound deadeners, such as a plastic-like substance applied to metal panels, adhesives for applying pads to panels, the socalled undercoating material, whic may be applied to the exposed underparts of an automotive vehicle, and others. Such substances are used in the manufacture of such things as automobiles and automobile bodies, cabinets for refrigerators or coolers and display cabinets and are also used in some shops for conditioning manufactured articles, such as the applying of an undercoating to an automobile.

The object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus for discharging such a substance from the container or drum in which it is contained as the material is used. Some materials may be used with different kinds of guns for spraying or otherwise applying or ejecting the substance where needed, and the substance is discharged from the drum as it is applied to the gun. Generally the fiowable substance is pumped from the drum and at the same time, the drum walls are wiped clean as the level of the substance in the drum lowers so that very little residue remains in the drum. vMoreover, after a drum has been used for a while its walls may be deformed with dents or bulges and the drums are usually formed with reinforcing bead which then forms an interior recess and the arrangement of the invention is such that even though the drum walls are thus irregular, an eilicient wiping action thereof is effected. The apparatus embodies means for holding the drum in position as well as means for moving the drums to and from the apparatus. Other objects will become apparent as the following detailed description is considered in connection with the accompanying drawings which shows one form of apparatus for carrying out the invention.

Fig. l is a general view with some parts cut away and some parts in section showing an apparatus constructed in accordance with the invention.

Fig. 2 is a general perspective view with some parts removed illustrating means for handling and loading the'drum.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged perspective view showing the pump mechanism and the follower mechanism.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged view partly in section showing a form of control valve.

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 4 howing the control valve adjusted to another position.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged view showing the'control valves and gauges.

As illustrated in Fig. 2, the apparatus includes a suitable base I for upstanding spaced posts 2 and 3 in the form of cylinders. A back member 5 positioned horizontally may be attached to the cylinders and supported by rods 6. This back member advantageously is generally of U-shape so that a drum may be moved in between the cylinders 2 and 3 and be abutted against the member 5 for proper location.

There is also shown in Fig. 2 a form of conveyor which may be associated with the apparatus, this conveyor embodying rails 8 and 9 which pass in between the cylinders 2 and 3 and which carry a multiplicity of transverse rollers 10. At the end of the conveyor opposite the apparatus is a means for loading the drums on the conveyor, this means being in the form of two arms l2, suitably braced together as shown, and pivoted to the rails 8 and 9 as at I 3, and conveniently provided with handles I 4. A loaded drum may be placed upon the pivoted structure in a manner a shown in dotted lines in Fig. 2, and the pivoted structure may be lifted to upend the drum and set it on the conveyor rollers as indicated by the full lines in Fig. 2. The drum is shown at D. It will be appreciated how a drum thus standing on a conveyor may be very easily pushed along the rollers 56 until it abuts the locating piece 5 with the drum lying between the cylinder posts 2 and 3. In the use of the machine a number of drums may be placed on the conveyor in a standing position so that they can be quickly placed into operating position as an emptied drum is removed.

As shown in Fig. l, the drum is in operating position between the posts 2 and 3. There is a cross head 28, carried by piston rods 2! which extend into the cylinders 2 and 3 and each of which is provided at its lower end with a piston 23 which fits within its respective cylinder. The lower ends of the cylinders are closed and suitable packing is used at the upper ends of the cylinders around the piston rods. Carried by the cross head is a pump operating mechanism shown herein as in the form of an air motor having a cylinder 26 with a reciprocating piston 25 therein and with a controlling valve mechanism as indicated at 25. A supply line is shown at 28 which may have a general shut off valve 29 for controlling the flow of air from a source of supply. A flexible conduit 30 conducts air from line 23 to the cylinder 24. An air pressure regulator 3|, which may be associated with a gauge 32, is provided so that the pressure to the air motor may be controlled. The specific form of air motor may vary and suffice it to say that when air is supplied thereto the piston 25 reciprocates in the cylinder. Such air motors are well known and are available on the market, the valve mechanism thereof being such as to cause the piston to reciprocate when a constant supply of air is supplied thereto.

A conduit, preferably flexible, is shown at 33 and is connected, preferably detachably, to a fitting 34 mounted on the apparatus. The air may be conducted from fitting 34 to a T-fitting 35 leading from which is a conduit 36 which extends into the bottom of the cylinder 3. Connected into the conduit 36 is a conduit 31 which connects into the bottom of the cylinder 2, the conduit 37 preferably running around the back side of the locating member 5. Positioned in the conduit 36 is a control valve 46 which may be of a construction as shown in Figs. 4 and 5. This valve is operable to establish the line for flow of air therethrough and is operable to close the supply line and vent the cylinders.

The supply line runs through a pressure regulating valve and then through a control valve 56 similar to the valve 40. From the valve 58 the supply line extends as at 52 to the top of the cylinder 3 and a line 53 extends around the back of the member 5 and enters the top of the cylinder 2. indicating the pressure of the air supplied to the upper ends of the cylinders.

There is a follower arranged to enter the drum somewhat in the fashion of a piston and the follower is carried by the cross head 28. A fitting which constitutes an outlet fixture 56 is attached to the air motor and carried by the cross head 20 and attached to the fitting is a depending pipe 5?, the lower end of which is secured to a follower disc 58. The air motor operates the pump shaft 68 which extends down through the pipe 57 and a pump tube 6| is disposed within the pipe.

The follower disc is advantageously of recessed form on its underside to aid in the movement of the material to the pump, and the one shown is concave-convex in form as shown in Fig.3. and the pump tube extends below the same and is provided adjacent its lower end with inlet ports 62. The ports lead to a chamber closed at the lower end of the pipe by a diaphragm 63 in which the stem of a check valve 64 is freely slidabie, the check valve being arranged to engage a seat 55. On the lower end of shaft 60 is a pitson 56 with a passage therethrough. A ball check valve 61 is at the entrance end of this passage; a second ball check valve 68 is adjacent a series of outlet ports 69 which connect into the pump tube. The fitting 55 has an outlet to which an outlet conduit preferably in the form of a flexible hose or the like "H is attached. The outlet conduit 'H connects to hose 86 equipped with a suitable gun or spray device 81 for applying or otherwise using the material. An air bell 25 is connected to the outlet conduit 1|. This air A pressure gauge 54 is provided for 1 bell provides a suitable air cushion and serves to level out the impulses of the pump to thus provide a flow through the gun S! of fairly uniform nature.

The follower 58 is provided with a pneumatic tube which engages with the inside walls of the drum. This tube is shown at 83 and is preferably made of a plastic or synthetic rubber which will not be affected by the various solvents in the materials with which the device may be used. It has been found that a plastic of the type not generally known as synthetic rubber is satisfactory. The tube is covered by a fabric casing 12 which may have an outer seam 13 and inner peripheral edges which are clamped to the disc 58 by means of a ring 14 with a number of rivets or bolts 15 passing therethrough. The tube has a fitting 16 for connection to a flexible air supply hose TI. The interior of the concave disc 58 has an air vent tube 18 which may be closed by air cap 19.

The tube H is connected to the air supply line as at 8| and this supply line is provided with a pressure regulating valve 82 and a control valve 80. A relief valve 84 connects into the air supply line for the pneumatic tube of the follower and a gauge 88 shows the pressure. If, for any reason. such as the turning off of the main air supply over a period of time, such as overnight, it is desired to hold the follower in a set position, it may be so held by clamping one of the piston rods 2| as by means of a screw clamp 95.

The several control valves 4|], 50 and may be identical in construction and the valve 56 is shown in two positions in Figs. 4 and 5.

This valve has a body 4| connected into the air conduit. The body has a diaphragm 42 therein. On each side of the diaphragm the body has a series of ports 43 and 44. An operating slide 45 is slidably mounted 'on the body. The slide is provided with packing material 46 and 41 adja' cent each end which wipes on the surface of the body member 4| and which may be compacted by a spring 48 located in the space 49 between the operating slide and the exterior of the body.

As Fig. 4 is viewed, air under pressure is supplied to the lower end of the valve and in the Fig. 4 position the valve is closed against pas sage of air therethrough while the passage above the diaphragm is vented through the ports 43. When the slide is shifted to the position shown in Fig. 5, air entering the valve passes through the ports 44 through the space 49 and into the ports 43 and on to the upper ends of the cylinders.

In considering the operation of the apparatus, it may be assumed at the start that the follower i sufilciently elevated so that a drum may be pushed into position against the member 5. In a proper manner the follower is lowered against the material in the drum. This is done by raising the valve 50 to permit passage of air into the upper ends of the cylinders and by raising the valve 40 to vent the conduit 36 connecting to the bottom of the cylinders. Also valve 80 is adjusted to inflate the tube 83. Air that may be trapped under the follower may be released by loosening the cap 19 of the vent tube to thus insure that the body of the material surrounds the lower end of pump tube 6|. The air entering the fluid motor through conduit 30 reciprocates the pump and it will be appreciated that on the down stroke of the piston 66 the material passes through the check valves 6'! and 68 and into the pump tube and at this time the check valve 64 is closed. On the upstroke the material is drawn in through the port 62 and through the check valve lid. The air entering the upper ends of the cylinders causes the follower to be urged downwardly so that as the pumping action continues the follower progressively moves down with the level of the material. The pneumatic tube of the follower is maintained under a substantially determined constant pressure which can be regulated by the pressure control valve 82 and read at the pressure gaug 88. With the air motor thus operating to pump material, the follower maintains a pressure on thematerial and as it descends the interior surfaces of the drum are wiped substantially clean. The drum is usually provided with bead formations as shown forming an interior recess and, because the pneumatic tube can expand to some extent, even these grooves be wiped. In the event the drum a dent or ding as indicated at .r, the tube may contract to move over the same. It has been found that a pressure of from 18 to 22 pounds maintained in the pneumatic tube is desired pressure, although this may be varied with different materials and with different sizes of pneumatic tubes. The pressure is sufficient to give a nice wiping action without too much friction. If dents or other irregularities in the shape of the barrel cause the tube to be contracted, the pressure is relieved by the pressure relief valve at, but as soon as the tube passes over the deformation and may expand again, the pressure is supplied through the pressure control valve 82. Thus, the pneumatic tube of the follower is maintained under a substantially constant pressure. The speed of operation of the pump'may likewise be controlled by the pressure control valve 3 i. This may be varied with different materials. Likewise, the pressure exerted by the follower on the material may be controlled by the pressure control valve 5!. When an apparatus is to be used with a given type of material for doin a certain class of work, the pressure control valve 35 for operating the pump and the pressure control valve 5% for the downward movement of the follower may be set in the best relative positions for the material involved and this setting may be maintained for that material.

When the material has been exhausted and the follower is at the bottom of the drum it, of course, must be elevated. This is accomplished by shifting the valve 5% so that it will exhaust the air from the upper ends of the cylinders and shifting the valve to introduce air into the bottom of the cylinders. Also, the valve fit is shifted to exhaust the air from pneumatic tube of the follower so that the follower may be quickly raised. With the fell er raised above the drum the empty drum is backed out of position and a new filled drum is pushed into position.

Iclaim:

1. An apparatus for dispensing fluid and semifluid substances from containers therefor such as drums comprising, a follower for engaging the surface of the substance and movable into the drum, a pump associated with the follower for pumping the substance from under the follower, means for urging the foilower downwardly into the drum as the substance is pumped therefrom, a pneumatic tube on the follower for engaging and wiping the interior surface of the drum, meansoperable to in roduce air under pressure into the pneumatic tube and means operable to exhaust air from the pneumatic tube as the tube 6, expands and contracts incident to irregularities encountered as it progresses along the interior surfaces of the drum, whereby a substantially constant pressure is maintained in the pneumatic tube as it wipes the interior surfaces of the drum.

2. An apparatus for dispensing fluid and semifluid substances from containers therefor such as drums comprising, a follower for engaging the surface of the substance and movable into the drum, a pump associated with the follower for pumping the substance from under the follower, means for urging the follower downwardly into the drum as the substance is pumped therefrom, a pneumatic tube on the follower for engaging and wiping the interior surfaces of the drum, conduit means providing a source of air under pressure, including conduit means extending to the pneumatic tube, a pressure regulator valve in the conduit means for regulating the pressure transmitted to the pneumatic tube, and a relief valve in the said conduit means, whereby, as the follower progresses, and the pneumatic tube expands and is contracted incident to irregularities in the surface of the drum, air is introduced into the pneumatic tube when it expands and air is released therefrom when it is contracted, so that a substantially constant pressure is maintained in the pneumatic tube.

3. An apparatus for dispensing fluid and semifluid substances from containers therefor such as drums comprising, a follower for engaging the surface of the substance in the drum and having a pneumatic tube on its periphery for engaging and wiping the interior surfaces of the drum, air pressure means for urging the follower into the drum, said follower having a central disc por-- tion, a pump associated with the follower having an inlet underneath the disc portion for pumping the liquid from the drum as the follower de-- scends, conduit means for conducting air under pressure to the pneumatic tube, a pressure regulator valve and a pressure relief valve in the conduit means for introducing air into the pneumatic tube and for exhausting air from the pneumatic tube as it expands and contracts incident to encountering irregularities as the tube progresses along the interior surfaces of the drum, whereby a substantially constant pressure is maintained in the pneumatic tube.

4. An apparatus for dispensing fluid and semifluid substances from containers therefor such as drums comprising, a follower for engaging the surface of the substance in the drum and having a pneumatic tube on its periphery for engaging and wiping the interior surfaces of the drum, air pressure means for urging the follower into the drum, said follower having a central disc portion, a pump associated with the follower having an inlet underneath the disc portion for pumping the liquid from the drum as the follower descends, means for conducting air under pressure to the pneumatic tube including a pressure regulator valve and a pressure relief valve for maintaining a substantially constant determined pressure in the pneumatic tube, the central disc portion of the follower having a concavity at its underside for accommodating part of the pump and air vent means for venting the air from the pocket in said concavity.

5. An apparatus for dispensing fluid and semifluid substance from a container therefor such as a drum comprising, a pair of upright cylinders between which a drum is adapted to be placed, pistons in the cylinders having upwardly ex- 7 tending piston rods, a cross head carried by the piston rods, an air motor carried by the cross head, a downwardly extending pipe from the cross head having a follower secured to its lower end, pump means operated by the air motor and having an inlet on the underside of the follower, means for supplying air under pressure to the air motor, means for supplying air under pressure to the upper portions of the cylinders to cause the follower to move downwardly into the drum as the substance is pumped therefrom, a pneumatic tube on the follower for wiping the interior surfaces of the drum, conduit means including a pressure regulator valve and a pressure relief valve for supplying air to the pneumatic tube on the follower, and control valve means for venting the pneumatic tube and venting the air from the upper ends and for conducting air under pressure to the lower ends of the cylinders for raising the follower from the drum.

THEODORE A. HINZ.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date Moat Dec. 25, 1849 Van Fleet July 31, 1894 Weston et al Apr. 5, 1910 Watson Oct. 29, 1912 Jacobs Mar. 14, 1916 Schorr Apr. 5, 1921 Martin Apr. 21, 1925 Schock June 21, 1927 Fesler Sept. 25, 1928 Carlson May 21, 1929 Huber Feb. 18, 1930 Davis Oct. 21, 1930 Morse Dec. 22, 1931 Bizzarri May 1, 1932 Bell Jan. 31, 1933 Ayer et al. Dec. 5, 1933 Barks et a1 Oct. 20, 1936 McGlade Feb. 28, 1939 Plummer et al June 25, 1940 Ginter Nov. 19, 1940 Cowl Apr. 13, 1943 Titus et a1 Feb. 8, 1944

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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/258, 222/320, 222/389, 222/259
International ClassificationF16N37/00, B67D7/00, B67D7/02
Cooperative ClassificationB67D7/0227, F16N37/00
European ClassificationF16N37/00, B67D7/02D