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Publication numberUS2630615 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 10, 1953
Filing dateOct 21, 1949
Priority dateOct 21, 1949
Publication numberUS 2630615 A, US 2630615A, US-A-2630615, US2630615 A, US2630615A
InventorsMoore David Pelton
Original AssigneePhilip N Youtz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of molding reinforced hollow concrete walls
US 2630615 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D. P. MOORE March 10, 1953 METHOD OF MOLDING REINFORCED HOLLOW CONCRETE. WALLS Filed Oct. 21, 1949 IN VEN TOR Patented Mar. 10, 1953 METHOD OF -MOLDING REINFORCED HOLLOW CONCRETE WALLS David Pelton Moore, Roslyn, N. Y., assignor of one-half "to Philip -N. Youtz, YorktownHeights,

Application October 21, 1949, Serial Nc. 122,700

This invention relates to improvements in methods of making 'walls for buildings, one object of the invention being the provision of a method of making a reinforced concrete wall building, in which an air space is provided approximately throughout the wall and within such wall, such wall being constructed *ina prone position with the outlets, such as door, window and ventilator frames in place, and also in a prone position in situ, to be placed inpositio'n by jacks, the final prone 'positionedand formed Wall being in the nature of a prefabricated Wall, which though made in the locale "may 'be'carried by truck and lifted by crane or otherwise and set in place upon footers already and previously made at the point of erection of the final building.

Another object of the present invention is the utilization of paper sheets as the airspace forming elements, the said sheets to remain in the wall.

Still another objectof the invention is the provision of a new method of casting and forming the wall with such air space and utilizing therewith a novel paper support during the pouring of the concrete, so that the wall when-coalesced will carry such air space and also the paper supports therein with metal ties for holding the 'sections or slabs together.

Heretofore when casting an air-spaced wa'll, sand has been used as the separator between the inner and outer slabs, and after the concrete in such slabs have set, the sand must be waterfiushed, a very undesirable feature, as a great amount of water is required, and a very sloppy operation results, often, where the wall is cast in situ, making it necessary to 'carry the sand slush away by sluices and the like. By the use of the paper as herein set forth, the Weight of the poured concrete is taken car of, *while the removable spacing members act as the piers for supporting the paper at predetermined points, and after the concrete is set, are very'easily 'slid out between the sheets of papers, which'are per mitted to remain in the walls.

In order that the invention may be fully understood and its numerous advantages appreciated, attention is invited to the "accompanying drawings, in which: I I

"Figure 1 is a cross section through a portion'of one wall upon itssupporting platform.

Figure 2 is a top viewof a'complete'w'allcompleted.

Figure 3 is a corner of such wall, showing the various layers and removable paper supports in place.

Figure 4 is a plan view of 'one'type of binding Wire.

Figur'e5is a side view thereof.

Figure 6 is a plan view of ainodified form'ol binding network.

Referring to the drawings, and more particularly to Figs. 1-6, thenumeral l .designates'a supporting platform, which may be raisedby a jack which canel'evat'e the wallto a vertical "position when the same is formed at point of erection, and which platform maybe at the manufacturing poin'twh'en the wall is in the ri'atureof a prefabricated wall.

In making this wall, a, layer 2 of concrete is poured over theplatform the size of the complete wall, the door and window frames, however, having been previously .placed in proper positions upon the platform. A metal reforcement 3, in thenature of a wire "fence network is placed within the body 2 of concrete, and then spread and tamped lightlyupon theexpose'd'surface thereof are sheets 4 of corrugated paper, these sheets in practice being approximately 6 feet by '12 feet in size. They are spread over the entire surface of the concrete 2 and'are out to fit around the door and window frames. iRectangula'r in cross section longitudinal strips 1 are now placed at equi-distant interval's'upon the sheet 4, in aligned pairs, and each strip is provided with an aperture 1, thepurpose of which will presently appear. Where these strips are used adjacent the window and door'frames, they are shortened, as at 1", and when they are allin place throughout the entire wall'sur'face, a second sheet 4 of corrugated paper is laid over them, so that the strips 1 act as bridging supports for the sheet 4 of paper, and the sheets are sufficientl strong to support the thenpoured concrete8, which forms the 'face'of the wall after it is erected in a vertical position.

In orderto provide means for h'oldin'g'thetwo concrete slabs '2 and '8 together, after the same has'c'oalesced or set, and the strips 'll have been withdrawn'from the wall and an airspace'is thus formed between the silabsfa number of binding wires 5 with barbed terminals "6, had been placed first within the body 2 of concrete, and before the sheet -l was placed in 1posi'tion,the "terminals '6 having pierced the sheet 4 and e xtended beyond the outer face of the sheet "4', while reverse binding wires 5', were forced with their terminals through the "sheet 4', and through the sheet 4 into 'the soft concrete 2, just after the sheet 4 was placed upon the strips 7. By this means metal ties are provided within the slabs to hold the slabs apart and provide a unitary wall with the proper air space therein.

The metal reinforcement 9 for the slab 8 has its ends 9 extended beyond the side ends of the wall, so that when a mating wall is set upon a footer or concrete base at point of erection, these ends 9 will be engaged by twisting similar ends of the abutting wall, and thus form means for holding the corners together, the corner space, not shown, then being filled by poured concrete and suitable molds, or by prefabricated ornamental corners that fit in such space.

The air space thus formed can be one inch to 2 inches in width, and will extend throughout the wall uninterrupted except at the door and window frames, and thus there can be no sweating upon the inner face of the slab 2, as is the case when solid concrete walls are molded and used.

The slab 8 may be made ornamental in many ways, as ornamental lintels, heads, and moldings can be set in place therein, and as the paper thus positioned and supported can carry a load of 1,000 lbs. per square foot, and as the concrete will set in from 24 to 70 hours, the strips '5 can be pulled out, and the sheets 44' left in the wall, the binding wires 5 and their terminals 6 securely holding the slabs together.

On some occasions, the modified form of network and binding device as shown in Fig. 6 is preferable, the end ones 5' being similar to the wire 5, while the cross wires 5 carried by the longitudinal wires 5 have no bent terminals, but act to hold the paper 4' flat and as additional metal reinforcement in the slab.

In this construction, both or only one slab may be metal reinforced.

It will thus be seen that constructing a reinforced Wall in this manner an inexpensive wall can be completed in a prone position, to be set up or tipped upon the previously prepared basement floor or footers, and that for small residences, walls made in accordance with this method will be air vented, and pockets can be formed upon the inner face to receive joints and ceiling beams of wood or metal, and that a storm proof, fire-resisting house can be made, as the floors and roof can be made of concrete, while the doors and window frames and sashes can be of metal.

By this method, the usual cumbersome and most times, expensive mold boards or forms normally used in holding vertical walls are dispensed with, and a very much better finish is possible upon the outer exposed face of the wall, as it can be finished while in a prone position.

When a metal reinforcement such as welded wire fabric is employed, the ties 5-5 may be dispensed with, and in this instance certain of the cross strands of the fabric are cut and bent at right angles, and of a sufficient length to span the two sheets of corrugated paper and be twisted about the other fabric reinforcement. Thus the fabric in the first instance has these ties cut and formed before the fabric is placed on the concrete slab 2, and project upwardly to be later attached to the reinforcement fabric 9, as viewed in Fig. 1. In this manner, the two reinforcing fabrics in addition to reinforcing the respective slabs, also hold the two slabs firmly together, so that the same can be lifted as a unit.

Where only one slab is reinforced, the tie portions are extended through both sheets of paper and anchored in the other slab.

The metal that forms the ties between the respective slabs must be of a non-corrodible metal,

for where exposed in the air chamber, they tend to corrode or rust and thus in time will disintegrate. This pertains to wires 56.

What is claimed, is:

l. The herein described method of making a hollow reinforced concrete wall, which consists in depositing a layer of concrete on a horizontal surface, in placing on said layer a metal reinforcing member having right angled tie rods projecting upwardly, in depositing a second layer of concrete to embed the reinforcing member, in placing on the second layer of concrete a sheet of corrugated paper with the tie rods piercing said sheet and extending thereabove, in placing on said sheet at intervals rectangular in cross section spacing and supporting longitudinal members and so that at least one end of each extends externally of one end of the wall, in placing upon the supporting and spacing members a second sheet of corrugated paper through which the tie rods project, in depositing on the second sheet of paper a layer of concrete, in placing on said last layer of concrete a metal reinforcement, in attaching the ends of the tie rods to the second metal reinforcement, in depositing a layer of concrete to embed the last metal reinforcement, in finishing the exposed surface of such layer of concrete, permitting the concrete layers to coalesce, and finally removing the spacing and supporting members.

2. The method as claimed in claim 1, wherein the spacing and supporting members regulate the Width of the air space between the concrete slabs and are so disposed as to be drawn from between the two sheets of corrugated paper, which latter remain in the wall.

3. The herein described method of making a hollow reinforced concrete wall, which consists in depositing a layer of concrete on a horizontal surface, in placing on said layer a metal reinforcing member having right angled tie rods projecting upwardly therefrom, in depositing a second layer of concrete to embed the reinforcing member, in placing on the second layer of concrete a sheet of material of sufficient strength to support the weight of an additional slab of reinforced concrete with the tie rods piercing said sheet and extending thereabove, in placing on said sheet at intervals rectangular in cross-section spacing and supporting longitudinal memlayer of concrete and to support a second concrete slab, in depositing on this second sheet a layer of concrete, in placing on said last men-- tioned layer of concrete a metal reinforcement, in attaching the ends of the tie rods to the second metal reinforcement, in depositing a layer of concrete to embed the last metal reinforcement, in finishing the exposed surface of such layer of concrete, permitting the concrete layers to coalesce, and finally removing the spacing and supporting members.

4. The herein described method of making a hollow reinforced concrete wall, which consists in forming a metal reinforced slab in a prone position with metal tie rods extended above the exposed surface thereof, in placing upon the exposed face of this slab at intervals rectangular in cross-section spacing and supporting longitudinal members and so that at least one end of each extends externally of one end of the wall, in

V placing upon the supporting and spacing members a sheet of material of suificient strength to support the weight 01 an additional slab of reinforced concrete with the tie rods piercing said sheet and extending thereabove, in depositing upon this sheet ofdiiaterial a layer of concrete, in placing on said; last mentioned layer of c'oiicrete a metal reinforcement, in attaching the ends of the tie rods'to the said metal reinforcement, in depositing a layer of concrete to embed the said metal reinforcement, in finishing the exposed suriace ot'the last layer of concrete, permitting the concrete to coalesce, and finallyremoving the spacing and supporting members; DAVID PELTON MOORE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

Number 8 UNITED STATES PATENTS Name J" Date Foster May 18, 1909 Marvin Jfii 27, 1915 Pray Mar. 7, 1916 Carroll Aug. 6, 1918 Lichtenberg Feb. 211, 1922 Schall July 24, 1923 Hunter May 19, 1925 Carrillon .1 (Ian. 5,1926 Stearns Jan. 12, 1926 Smith i May 18, 1926 Pedersen z Jan. 29, 1929 Crowe Mar. 6, 1945

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US921820 *Jul 23, 1906May 18, 1909Alexander FosterMethod of constructing buildings and apparatus therefor.
US1148246 *Jul 2, 1914Jul 27, 1915Robert S MarvinApparatus for constructing hollow reinforced-concrete walls.
US1174519 *Jan 8, 1915Mar 7, 1916Frank M PrayWall construction and method.
US1274987 *Oct 8, 1917Aug 6, 1918James T CarrollHollow-slab building structure.
US1406989 *Sep 18, 1920Feb 21, 1922Lichtenberg FredConcrete partition
US1462663 *Jul 15, 1922Jul 24, 1923Schall Clinton WSlab for building constructions
US1538815 *Nov 7, 1923May 19, 1925Hunter Percival NBuilding apparatus
US1568265 *Feb 9, 1924Jan 5, 1926Joseph M KlamonProcess for making reenforced-concrete walls
US1569309 *Oct 20, 1924Jan 12, 1926Stearns Henry MCement wall construction
US1585430 *Aug 28, 1925May 18, 1926Smith Horace FrankManufacture or production of hollow concrete floors, beams, and slabs
US1700512 *Feb 25, 1927Jan 29, 1929Pedersen Oscar AMethod and apparatus for constructing building units
US2370638 *Aug 22, 1941Mar 6, 1945Crowe Francis MalcolmHollow precast building slab and method of manufacture
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3341395 *Dec 3, 1962Sep 12, 1967Solar Reflection Room CorpLightweight structural panel
US4117639 *Jun 29, 1977Oct 3, 1978Butler Manufacturing CompanyReinforced insulated concrete building panel
US4131670 *May 23, 1977Dec 26, 1978Solai Vignola Di Fabiani Orlando E C.-Societa In Nome CollettivoMethod of making prefabricated building components of expanded material and cement
WO1998005835A1 *Jul 23, 1997Feb 12, 1998Eela HarriA flat structure, a method for manufacturing flat structures, an interconnecting element for flat composite structures, as well as a method for erecting structures
Classifications
U.S. Classification264/253, 52/383, 264/DIG.570
International ClassificationE04C2/34
Cooperative ClassificationY10S264/57, E04C2/34
European ClassificationE04C2/34