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Publication numberUS2630676 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 10, 1953
Filing dateJan 20, 1947
Priority dateJan 20, 1947
Publication numberUS 2630676 A, US 2630676A, US-A-2630676, US2630676 A, US2630676A
InventorsSeifert Donald W
Original AssigneeSeifert Donald W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Axial flow jet motor with rotating combustion products generator and turbine
US 2630676 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2 SHEETSSHEET l flan/1Z0! PRODUCTS GENERATOR AND TURBINE D. W. SEIFERT AXIAL FLOW JET MOTOR WITH ROTATING COMBUSTION 7 34 5w. 9 0 ,2 0. h C up. QW n N.

March 10, 1953 D. w. SEIFERT 2,630,675

AXIAL FLOW JET MOTOR WITH ROTATING COMBUSTION PRODUCTS GENERATOR AND TURBINE Filed Jan. 20. 1947 2 smzms-sm-zsw 2 g x .96 122 48 52 k w w% I /fi8 124 7 Q0 NVENTORI Z 24 DonaZdZJSezlfer Patented Mar. 10,1953

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE AXIAL FLOW JET MOTOR WITH ROTATING COMBUSTION PRODUCTS GENERATOR AND TURBINE Donald W. Seifert, Winona, Minn. Application January 20, 1947, Serial No. 722,987 r 17 Claims. (01. (so-39.35) 1 This invention relates to jet motors.

The jet motor of the present invention i'sof the type which is propelled by expulsion of gases rearwardly out of the motor, and which picks up air for combustion when traveling. This is distinguished from rockets in which the air for combustion is contained in the fuel provided in the device. By way of general explanation, the present invention applies to that type of fuel burning device in which the device is propelled forward by rearward expulsion of gases of combustion; the gases of combustion in the same propelling process rotate a driving element which in turn operates a compressor. The compressor then picks up air in the travel of the device, compresses it, and delivers it to the driving element where it supports combustion of the fuel.

An important advantage resides in this feature; in previous jet propelled devices, the combustion chamber was stationary, and the gases of combustion were then driven through a turbine which operated a compressor. In the device of the present invention, a plurality of combustion chambers are arranged in a rotating driving means, where the combustion takes place, so that the actual process of combustion produces a direct and immediate rotating force on the driving means.

The combustion driving means above referred to may also be referred to as an athodyd or athodyd stage. Athodyd" is a word recently coined from aero-thermo-dynamic-duct, and applies particularly to jet motors. This driving element may be referred to herein both as an athodyd driving means and a combustion driving means.

A portion of the power generated by the expulsion of gases out of the motor is utilized in driving the compressor but the air compressed by the compressor accomplishes more rapid combustion, resulting in higher speeds of the device.

Accordingly, the efficiency of such a device is increased as the speed of the motor is increased. This is a peculiarity of jet motors, and because of that condition, when the efficiency drops to a certain point, operation of the device ceases. As a correlative of this phenomenon, the device must be given an impulse by some auxiliary force to attain initial speed for the jet propulsion feature to become effective.

The present invention utilizes an elongated cylindrical casing; a shaft is rotatably mounted centrally of the casing, and the compressor and athodyd stage mentioned above are rotatably 2 mounted on the shaft. The casing is open at both ends taking in air at one, end and expelling; it at the other end. 1; Fuel is supplied to the athodyd driving means. and an ignition, device is provided for initial starting of the device. After the motor operates for a short time, the athodyd driving means becomes heated and the heat therefrom ignites the fuel; thereafter the ignition system is no longer required.

Another phenomenon peculiar to jet motors is that while both ends are open, the expulsion of gases is effected only in one direction, such ex pulsion being in the same direction as the influx of air which is brought in by the travel of the machine. The incoming air is compressed inside the motor and drives the gases of combustion out the opposite end.

An object of the present invention is the provision of a jet motor in which air compressed by the compressor-is deflected in a direction to be forced into an athodyd driving means. i

Another objectis the formation of the athodyd combustion driving means for eiilciently scooping up the compressed air deflected into it.

Afurther object of the invention is that the injection of fuel into the combustion driving means is assisted by the rotation of the driving means.

Still another object is the provision of a shape of combustion spaces in the driving means to render thepropulsion effect of the device and the turning force on the driving means, by the gases of combustion, more efllcient.

With these and other objects inview, my invention consists in the construction, arrangement and combination of the various parts of my device whereby the objects contemplated are attained, as hereinafter more fully set forth, pointed out in my 'claims and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of a portion of the jet motor of my invention;

Figure 2 is a developed partial view of the compressor and combustion driving means of the jet motor, as viewed from immediately inside the casing of the motor;

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken on line 3-3 of Figure 1;

Figure 4 is a longitudinal sectional view of a modified form of jet motor; and

Figure 5 is a longitudinal sectional view of a third type of jet motor. a l

The device of Figures 1 to 3 Referring now in detail to the drawings, the jet motor shown in Figures 1 and 2 includes a cylindrical casing I2 having a leading open end I4, and a trailing open end IS. The trailing end It is developed along airflow lines and terminates at a reduced cylindrical outlet I8; If desiredthe shape of the casing I2may be taperedv along air flow lines to produce more efiicient air flow, and

the working parts designed to conform to the;

shape of the casing.

Mounted centrally, axially ofthecasing I2 is a rotatable shaft 2|] supported atone end bya bearing support indicated generally at 22 and at the other end by another support indicated generally at 24. The bearing support 22 consists of a solid central portion 26 and" outwardly of the portion 26 are a plurality of blades 28 having their outer ends fixedly securedin the casing I2. The shape and. disposition. of these. blades 28, will be referredto later. Acentral' opening, is formed in the central portion 26 of the, bearing support 22, for supporting an anti-friction bearing 30 in whichv the respective end of the shaft 26 is supported. The bearingv 3!] maybe secured in place by a plate-32V secured to thebearing support 22.

Securedtothe leading end of the shaft 26 is a gear. 34. meshingwith'. another. gear 35 which is mounted on a trunnion 38 which in turn is mountedon the bearing support 22.

Thebearing support 24' includes a central hub 40.,of enlarged dimensions and 'a central portion 42.. outwardly of the'central, portion 42 are a plurality of bladesor fins '44, shown in Figure 2, secured. in their extremities to the casing I2.

I A turbocompressor is indicated generally at 46,- and" includes a rotary element 48. The rotary elementincludes a pair of end plates or discs 59 secured to the shaftZIJin aconventional manner, and a cylindrical member 52 fitted on the end plates 50." Securedtothe-outer surface of the cylindricaljmember 52 area plurality of sets of blades 54'spaced axially along the member'52. The blades 54 are'placedaround the member 52 as will be understood-by'those: familiar with turbines.

Spaced between-adjacentsets of blades 54 are setsxofci'ixedstationary buckets 56;. The buckets 56 are fixed to the inner surface of the casing. l2 and-extend between the: blades .54- down to a point adjacent the memberv 52.

. Theathodyd driving means is indicated gen erally'at58. The driving. element includes a hub 54 in the form of. a hollow drum and is made up of an innertubular member 65 and an outer tubular member 68 secured" together and sealed by sideplates-IU.

' Secured to theouter surfaceof the outer tubular member are a plurality ofblocks or blades I2. Theblades I2 are secured to the, tubular member 68, by means of bolts I4 extending through openings in the tubular member 68 and threaded into tapped holes in the blades I2. Several such boltsfi lmaybe employed in each blade .12; A coppercompression ring I6 surrounds each bolt I4 and fits in an annular seat in the tubular member-68, and-isadapted to be wedged therein by the bolt head. This copper ring forms a seal as well ast ameans for retaining the bolt I4 in tightened condition. A tube 'IBextends-through the outer tubular member 68 adjacent each blade I2; and connectswith an opening or passage-8B leading, from the tube I8 radially outwardly through the respectiveblade 12. The passages 80 terminate in jets 82 which extend and open 4 in a direction opposite of and tangential to the direction of rotation of the blades I2.

Between adjacent blades 12 are spaces 84 in which combustion of the fuel takes place. The shape of these spaces 84 is determined by the shape of the blades I2, and each space 84 in cludes a restriction 86 at the right end, or inlet, and a restriction=88 at theleft end, or outlet. Beyond the-'restrictionsllfi and 88 are diverging spaces 90 and 92.

The blades I2 are positioned on the drum 64 at an angle .thereto that is, each blade is turned on its own radial axis and positioned at an angle to the aXis of the driving means 58, and shaft 20.

The driving means 58 is supported on the shaft 20 by-means of a planetary gearing indicated generallyat 93, and which includes a ring gear 94 on the periphery of which the tubular member 66"issplined as indicated at 96. Certain of the splines 96 may be enlarged for the passage of air therethrough. The Weborcentral portionof thering gear structure is supported or1 asleeve 98' secured to and v rotatable on thezshaft' 20; A'

plurality of' planetary gears I05 mesh with; the} ring gear 94 and are supported on trunnions I02 secured in the bearing support 24. The outer;

ends of-the trunnions I02 are fitted with a ring; IM to prevent cantilever action, and consequent binding, on thetrunnion supports I02. The planetary gears. IDEI mesh with a: sun gear IIIIi mounted directly on the shaft 20'.

A shield I68, having atcentral opening for surrounding the trunnion supports I02, has an axial flange for locating. it on the ring. gear 94.. The shield I08 may be secured to the ring gear 94 in such' a manner as to slide axially thereon and is biased toward the-bearing; support 24 by means of compression springsIIB. The shield Hi8. serves as a grease retainer, for the planetary gearing 93;.

The sleeve98 is secured onto the shaft 20 by means of a block II2, threaded in the rear end of the sleeve; the block II2 seatsvagainst the interior shoulder in the. sleeve 98 and-against anti-frictionbearing I I4 whichfits in an annular recess H5. in the rear end of the. shaft 20. Another anti-friction bearing IIS is provided between the sleeve 98 and the. shaft 20 ahead of the bearing H4. Seals IIll are provided between the sleeve. 98. and shaft 28 at spaced points therein for. a purpose to be shown later. and are heldIin place therein bythe usual retainingrings. Fuel is supplied by. means of an exterior fuel line I20 which leads to a passage I22 in. one of the fins 44 and through the central portion d2; of the bearing support 24. The passage I22 then leads through the enlarged hub. 40 of the interior thereof and into a passage I24 in the shaft 20. The interior of the hub- 40 may be sealed by seals I26. An additonalantifriction bearing I 28 isprovided between the shaft Zil-and the hub 40. The passage in the. shaft 20 1eads rearwardly and. opens into the sleeve 98 between; the seals II 8. The seals II! therefore act as. retainers for the fuel passing through passage I24. From this space a. tube I30 leads to the interior of the hollow drum 64 from'there through the passages I8 and to the jets 82.

In the fin 44- in which the fuel passage I 22 is formed; an auxiliary outlet I32 opens rearwardly adjacent the blades I2 in the athodyd driving means 58; A solenoid operated closure I 34 extends into the outlet. [-32 for controlling the same. An ignition glow plug I 35 is positioned adjacent: the out1etil32,.and in surroundine:1:ela-

The ignition glow plug means I36 is Venturishaped, so that when the fuel from the outlet I32 passes therethrough it will be more readily ignited.

An inner shield I48 encloses the forward end of the central area of the interior of the motor leaving an annular passage I42 therearound. This passag I42 corresponds with the radial area occupied by the blades 54 and buckets 56 of the turbocompressor, and the blades I2 of the driving means 58. A similar shield I44 is provided at the rear and may be fixed to the rear end of the sleeve 98' by means of a plate I 48. The shield I44 is similar in outline to the rear end I6 of the casing and forms therewith an outlet passage I48.

Operation of the device of Figs. 1 to 3 A motor generator may be coupled with the gear 38 for starting purposes. To start the jet motor the starting motor is started which rotates the compressor and athodyd driving means up to a certain speed. The device, when operated up to the speed possible by the starting motor, produces compressed air by the compressor, which is forced rearwardly to the athodyd driving means 58, and ultimately out of the motor rearwardly.

Fuel emerges out of the outlet I32, and out of the jets 82; the auxiliary ignition means I38 is connected, which ignites the fuel leaving the outlet I32, which then ignites the fuel leaving the jets 82 in the athodyd spaces between the blades I2.

Both the propelling effect of the motor, and the rotary force on the athodyd driving means 58 is caused by the combustion of gases in the spaces 84 after compressed air is built up therein. The gases of combustion are forced rearwardly by the compressed air, and the reaction of the expulsion of gases of combustion forces the device forward; at the same time the reaction of the expulsion of the gases of combustion out of the spaces 84 produces a turning effect on the driving means 58 due to the angular disposi-- tion of the latter with respect to the axis of the shaft 28.

The combustion thus produced rotates the athodyd driving means 58 faster, which in turn rotates the compressor faster, and builds up greater pressure of air.

and burns therein. The combustion heats the blades 12 to such a degree that after initial starting by auxiliary means, the heat from the blades I2 causes the ignition of the fuel. After:

the driving means 58 is thus rotated for a time and becomes heated, the ignition means I36 can be cut out and the solenoid operated closure I34 closed. At the same time the starting motor may be automatically cut out.

By the time the fuel emerges from the jets 82 it is fully vaporized. The centrifugal force of the athodyd driving means throws the fuel in the drum 84 against the tubular member 88, outwardly beyond the inner ends of tubes I8, and heat conducted from the blades 12 vaporizes it. Such vaporized fuel then passes through the passages I8 and 80, and out the jets 82.

, However, when the device is being started, fuel in liquid form may emerge from the jets. Fuel The fuel emerging out of the jets 82 enters into the spaces 84 is pumped into the drum 84 until it is deep 82 adds to the force of combustion in rotating the driving means similar to the action of a lawn sprinkler.

The turbocompressor 46 is similar in construc-" tion to a steam turbine, but of course in the present instance the operation is reversed for accomplishing the results of a compressor. Fins 28, buckets 58 and fins 44 operate to direct air in certain given directions through the compres- The blades 54 are arranged at different angles successively through the motor from the leading end to the trailing end as indicated in Figure 2. Finally the fins 44 are directed in a direction for deflecting the compressed air in a particular direction into the combustion driving element 58. Each set of buckets 5B deflects air between successive sets of blades 54 so that the succeeding set of blades 54 produces a maximum compression effect. The fins 44 are positioned at nearly the same angle relative to the axis of the shaft 20 as the angle of the blades I2 of the driving means 58. The air is thereby deflected as nearly directly into the spaces 84 as is possible. The diverging spaces at the leading ends of the spaces 84 are adapted to scoop up the entering air more readily, and the trailing diverging spaces 82 accomodates the exhaust gases more readily.

The expulsion of gases of combustionreacts against such compressed air and the blades I2 to rotate the blades in the direction indicated by the arrow in Figure 2. The planetary gearing 93 through which the driving means 58 is con nected with the shaft 28 reverses the direction of rotation between the driving mean and the compressor.

The expulsion of gases of combustion at the rear opening I48 drives the motor ahead. and in such forward travel air is scooped up in the leading open end I4 where it is compressed by the compressor. The greater the compressed air built up by the compressor, the greater i the expulsion of gases out of the rear end and vice versa, thus resulting in an arrangement whereby the faster the motor travels the more efiicient itbecomes. 8

One of the fins 44 may be enlarged to accommodate the fuel line I22, as shown in Figure 3, and certain others of the fins may be formed similarly for symmetry. Figure 2 shows the fins 44 diagrammatically, to show their angular disposition, and to illustrate their function in directing air into the spaces 84 of the driving means 58.

The gearing 34-46 may be utilized for driving auxiliary equipment such as lighting on a ship in which the device is used.

As an alternative, jets may be provided in only The device of Figure 4 The essential difference between the device of Figure 4 and that of Figure 1 is that the turbocompressor is made up of counter rotating elements. The differences in detail between the two figures will beqpointd out hereinafter, and.

the similarities; will not be dwelt. upon.

The; turbocompresson in .Figure 4 is indicated generally at I50 and comprises a central rotary element I52 secured on the shaft I54. The rotary element, I52 i -provided with a plurality of sets of curved blades, I56 inc1ined successively toward the axialfrom the inlet M to the rear, similarly to those of, Figure 1. Although the blades I56 are inclined similarly to the blades 54 of Figure 1, they are also curved similarly to the buckets 5B of Figure l, to producemore efficient action of the compressor.

An-outer rotary elementindicated generally at I5 1 su rrounds the central rotary element and includes adrum or cylindrical member I58 having. a plurality of sets of inwardly extendingbucketsQIIiI] positioned between adjacent sets of blades I56. The outer rotary element i5l' is freely-rotatable on theshaft I54. Fins ISZ-are formedradially aroundthe forward and rearward ends; of the .outerrotary element I57, in line with the blades I56v and buckets I60.

The trailing side of the outer rotary element I51 is provided with a cylindrical extension I54 on-Which is. formed a ring gear H56. Planetary gears I63 are mounted on shafts no supported in bearing support I12. The bearing support I72 is constructed similarly to the bearing support 24. of Figurel. on-the shaft I54, meshes with the planetary gears I68.

The combustion driving; means of Figure 4 is indicated generally at I16. and is supported on thetrailing end of the shaft I54 to rotate freely thereon.

Formed in the leading side of the driving means H6 is a ring gear I18, with which mesh planetary gears I80 on the rear ends of the shaft III A sun gear. I82 is fixedly secured on the shaft I54 imposition to mesh with the planetary gears I 80.

The remaining features of the device of Figure; are the same or similar to corresponding features of the device of Figure l and in part are illustrateddiagrammatically in Figure 3.

Operation of the device in Figure 4 Upon rotation of the driving means III; the outer rotary element I5! of the, compressor rotates in the samedirection as the driving means. Since both areconnected to corresponding parts of; similar planetary gearing, the central rotary element I52,of thecompressor rotates in a direction opposite to that of the driving means and therefore in the opposite direction of the outer rotary element I58;

.Theeffect of such; counter-rotation therefore The device of Figure 5 The device shown in Figure 5 is similar to that of Figure 1, but the gearing between the combustion driving means and the shaft is eliminated, In such a construction, fuel may proceed directly from thepassage I 24, into thehole low drum I86, andthrough the passages I8 and 80., nd, Jets, 82...

A sun gear I'M, fixedly secured In hepr entinstance Fi ura he c m us.

' tral rotary element 48 thereof is fixedly secured to the shaft I88. In such a devicethe rotary element of the compressor and the driving means rotate in the same direction. Efiiciency is gained by the elimination of the gearing between the driving means and the shaft. However, it may be desirable to provide a gearing just mentioned, instead of eliminating it, to cause greater rotation of the compressor element than of the driving element. If it should happen that the speed of the driving element would be limited due to the presence of intensive heat, or other causes, it should not be necessary to limit the speed of the rotary element of the compressor, for the same reasons. The rotary element of the compressor is relatively cold and may attain greater speed-and centrifugal force for building up greater pressures.

The efiiciency of the device is improved due to the fact that combustion takes place directly in the rotary driving means. guished from previous types of jet motors where gases passed from a stationary combustion space to a turbine driving element with consequent loss of efilciency. In the present device such loss of efiiciency, is eliminated.

While I have herein shown preferred embodiments of my invention, it will be understood of course that I do not wish to be limited thereto since many modifications may be made, and I therefore contemplate by the claims appended hereto to cover any such modifications or substitutions of equivalents as fall within the true spirit and scope of my invention.

I claim:

'1. In a jet motor, a casinghaving open ends, a rotatable combustion driving means in said casing having a plurality of radial blades, each pair of adjacent radial blades bounding a combustion chamber therebetween, a fuel passage adapted for connection with a source of fuel, said fuel passage extending through said combustion driving means, and a plurality of passages leading from said fuel passage and extending through said blades and terminating in jets opening into the combustion chambers between the blades.

2. In a jet motor, a casing having open ends, a rotatable combustion driving means in said casing having a plurality of radial blades, each pair of adjacent radialblades bounding a combustion chamber therebetween, a fuel passage adapted for connection with a source of fuel, said fuel passage extending through said combustion driving means, and a plurality of passages leading from said fuel passage and extending through said blades and terminating in jets, said jets being positioned at the outer tips of said blades and opening into the combustion chambers between the blades in a direction opposite to the direction of rotation of said combustion driving means.

3. In a jet motor, a casing having open ends, a rotatable combustion driving means in said casing having a plurality of radial blades, each pair of adjacent radial blades'bounding a combustion chamber therebetween, said blades being disposed at an angle with respect to the axis of the combustion driving element, about their respective radial axes, a fuel passage adapted for This is distin onnection with a source of fuel, said fuel passage extending through said combustion driving means, a plurality of passages leading from said fuel passageand extending through said blades andterminating in jets opening into the a rotatable combustion driving means in said casing having a plurality of radial blades, said radial blades forming combustion chambers therebetween, said combustion chambers being of reduced dimension toward the leading end of said casing, and means including, passages through said blades terminating tangentially thereof for injecting fuel into said combustion chambers.

5. In a jet motor, a casing having open ends, a shaft rotatable in said casing, a bearing support in said casing, said bearing support having radial fins secured to said casing, and combustion driving means mounted on said shaft downstream of said bearing support, and a fuel passage adapted for connection with a source of fuel, said fuel passage extending through one of said fins in said bearing support, through said shaft, and through said combustion driving means and having an outlet therein.

6. In a jet motor, a casing having open ends, a shaft rotatable in said casing, a bearing support in said casing, said bearing support having radial fins secured to said casing, and a combustion driving means mounted on said shaft, said combustion driving means having blades at its outer portion, thereby forming an annular air passage through said casing, and a fuel passage adapted for connection with a source of fuel, said fuel passage extending through one of said fins in said bearing support, through said shaft, and through the blades of said combustion driving means and having tangential outlets therein, said fuel passage having a second outlet opening out of said fin of said bearing support into said annular air passage and into said combustion driving means, and ignition means in said annular air passage adjacent said second outlet.

7. In a jet motor having a rotatable shaft and combustion driving means rotatable on said shaft, said driving means comprising, in combination, a hub adapted for mounting on said shaft, a plurality of blades extending radially from said hub, there being passages in said blades leading from said hub outwardly and terminating in jets opening out of said blades tangentially thereof, said blades being disposed at an angle, with respect to the axis of said hub, about their respective radial axes, said blades being restricted between their edges so that the spaces between adjacent blades have restricted dimensions at opposite ends in a direction axially of said driving means, and means for supplying fuel through said passages.

8. In a jet motor, a casing having open ends adapted for flow of air therethrough, a shaft in said casing, an axial flow rotor on said shaft, a plurality of radial blades on said rotor, each blade having a leading edge and a trailing edge, the leading edge being offset from the trailing edge in the direction of rotation of said rotor, each blade having a leading face and a trailing face, the leading face of each blade and the opposite facing trailing face of the previous blade being shaped to form therebetween a flow passageway having an enlarged combustion chamber formed intermediate the ends thereof, and fuel passages in said blades opening to the combustion chambers.

9. A jet motor as set forth in claim 8, wherein said fuel passages extend radially through said blades and terminate in jets positioned adjacen the outer tips of the blades.

10. A jet motor as set forth in claim 8, wherein the fuel passages open to the combustion chamber through the trailing face of the blade.

11. A jet motor as set forth in claim 8, wherein the fuel passages open in a diretcion opposite to the direction of rotation of the rotor.

12. A jet motor as set forth in claim 8, wherein the fuel passages open through the trailing face of the blade in a direction having a component tangent to the trailing face of the blade.

13. A jet motor asset forth in claim 8,, wherein said faces of the blades form a throat in said flow passageway downstream of said combustion chamber and also form an expansion nozzle downstream of said throat.

14. In a jet motor, a casing having open ends adapted for flow of air therethrough, a shaft in .said casing, an axial flow rotor on said shaft. a

plurality of radial blades on said rotor,each blade having a leading edge and a trailing edge, the leading edge being offset from the trailing edge in the direction of rotation of said rotor, each blade having a leading face and a trailing face, the leading face of each blade and the opposite facing trailing face of the previous blade being shaped to form therebetween a flow passageway having an enlarged combustion chamber formed intermediate the ends thereof, a plurality of axially spaced sets of fins upstream of the rotor, the last set of fins through which the air passes before it enters said rotor being disposed at an angle to the axis of the motor, and the axes of said combustion chambers being straight and extending parallel to said last set of fins.

15. In a jet motor, a casing having open ends adapted for flow of air therethrough, a. shaft in said casing, an axial flow rotor on said shaft, and a plurality of radial blades on said rotor, each blade having a leading edge and a trailing edge, the leading edge being offset from the trailing edge in the direction of rotation of said rotor, each blade having a leading face and a trailing face, the leading face of each blade and the opposite facing trailing face of the previous blade being shaped to form therebetween an axial flow passageway comprising, in order passing downstream, a first throat, a combustion chamber of enlarged width, a second throat, and an expansion nozzle.

16. In a jet motor, a casing having open ends adapted for flow of air therethrough, a shaft in said casing, an axial flow rotor on said shaft. a plurality of radial blades on said rotor, each blade having a leading edge and a trailing edge, the leading edge being offset from the trailing edge in the direction of rotation of said rotor, each blade having a leading face and a trailing face, the leading face of each blade and the opposite facing trailing face of the previous blade being shaped to form therebetween a flow passageway having an enlarged combustion chamber formed intermediate the ends thereof, the axes of said combustion chambers being straight and disposed at an angle to the axis of the motor, a throat in each said flow passageway downstream of said combustion chamber and an expansion nozzle downstream of said throat, and the portion of the blade leading face downstream of the expansion nozzle extending axially of the com-- bustionchainberakis further than the portion of the blade trailing face downstream of the expansion nozzle, whereby the flow issuing from the fiow passageway is turned toward a direction parallel to said motor axis. V

17, In a jet motor, a casing having open ends,

ashaft in said casing, radial fins between said shaft and said casing, a combustion driving means on said shaft downstream of said radial fins, a fuel passage adapted for connection with a sourceof fuel, said fuel passage extending through one of said fins, through said shaft, and

through said combustion driving means and havingan outlet therein, said fuel passage having a second outlet opening in said fin, said second opening facing in a direction downstream of the and ignition means between said fin and said combustion drive means adjacent said second The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

Number Number I2 UNITED STATES PATENTS Name -Date Gordon May 29,1934 Lysh01m :May 18,1937 Graves Jan. 28,1941 Jendrassik 'May 27,1941 Zigler July 22,1941 Seippel Aug.3, 1943 Birg'e June 26, 1945 Biichi -Dec. 11,1945 Walton Nov. 5,1946 Vernon Aug. 19, 1947 Emigh 'Mar. .29, 1949 Price Aug. 23, 1949 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Great Britain- Oct. 18, 1906 Great-Britain Dec. 18, 1930

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2928239 *Mar 16, 1954Mar 15, 1960Arthur W GoldsteinImpelled charge gas explosion turbine with constant volume, pressure raising combustion chambers
US3023980 *Oct 13, 1958Mar 6, 1962Thompson Ramo Wooldridge IncTurbo-fan lift device
US3037351 *May 14, 1956Jun 5, 1962Paul O TobelerCombustion turbine
US3971209 *Jul 16, 1974Jul 27, 1976Chair Rory Somerset DeGas generators
US6886325 *Nov 24, 2003May 3, 2005United Technologies CorporationPulsed combustion engine
US7100360 *Jun 27, 2003Sep 5, 2006United Technologies CorporationPulsed combustion engine
US9413208 *Jan 8, 2013Aug 9, 2016Hamilton Sundstrand CorporationEnhanced cooling of enclosed air cooled high power motors
US20040123582 *Nov 24, 2003Jul 1, 2004Norris James W.Pulsed combustion engine
US20050000205 *Jun 27, 2003Jan 6, 2005Sammann Bradley C.Pulsed combustion engine
US20140191597 *Jan 8, 2013Jul 10, 2014Hamilton Sundstrand CorporationEnhanced cooling of enclosed air cooled high power motors
Classifications
U.S. Classification60/39.35
International ClassificationF02C3/16, F02C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02C3/16
European ClassificationF02C3/16