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Publication numberUS2630751 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 10, 1953
Filing dateDec 22, 1945
Priority dateDec 22, 1945
Publication numberUS 2630751 A, US 2630751A, US-A-2630751, US2630751 A, US2630751A
InventorsEarl Cranston Albert, Edward Cranston Albert, James Cranston Royal
Original AssigneeAlbert E Cranston Sr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wrapping and binding machine
US 2630751 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 10, 1953 A. CRANSTON ET AL WRAPPING AND BINDING MACHINE 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 22, 1945 March 1953 A. E. CRANSTON ETAL 2,530,751

WRAPPING AND BINDING MACHINE '7 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Dec. 22, 1945 INVgNTORS 41. BERT 150M420 lea/yawn 20ml. JAMEJ C 9411570 BY .4LBERT f YEL CQANJI'ON March 1953 A. E. cRANsToN, ETAL 2,630,751

' WRAPPING AND BINDING MACHINE Filed Dec. 22, 1945 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 8/ 61552115221. Qumran:

f {I'M IN HTMRNEVJ March 10, 1953 A. E. CRANSTON ETAL 2,530,751

WRAPPING AND BINDING MACHINE Filed Dec. 22, 1945 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 f llilllbllimlliIIIIHIHIIIHIWWIlImIIlIWP!!!mlllliiilltilillmflw! mus/v mes 4L BERT 0w420 Cemvsran ROYAL JAMES C'Efl/VS TON 41 BERT 421. CkA/VJTON March 10,1953 A. E. CRANSTON ETAL WRAPPING AND BINDING momma 7 Sheets-Sheet '7 Filed Dec. 22, 1945 TJKS MM! TON POY/U.

Patented Mar. 10, 1953 2,630,751 WRAPPING AND BINDING MACHINE Albert Edward Cranston,

and Albert Earl Gran Application December 22,

29 Claims.

This invention relates to bundle binding machines and it has reference more particularly to machines of those types wherein a band laying member travels about the bundle to be bound and as it travels, lays a band that is held at one end, under tension, about the bundle and places a secondary end portion of the band in overlapped relationship with the held end for their securement together.

It is the principal object of this invention to provide a, binding machine that is equipped with a band laying means of the above stated character adapted for the binding of bundles with metal band, wire, rope or paper tape; which is of simplified construction; relatively inexpensive, light in weight and easy to operate.

It is also an object of the invention to provide a machine having a band laying member of ring-like or annular form, within which the bundle may be supported for binding and whereon a spool of the supply of binding band, wire, rope or tape may be mounted and the band payed out under tension therefrom about the bundle as the band laying member rotates.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a machine having band laying means of the rotary ring type, that travels in the same direction for successive binding operations, and wherein provision is made for automatically providing slack in the binding band supply that eliminates the necessity for back dragging of the band from the supply for applying the primary end portion to the holding means.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a machine that is so designed that inertial load on the band laying means is practically elimlnated at the start of each binding operation and therefore permits the machine to be started easily and speedily, and wherein the load on the band reaches a maximum at the stopping position and therefore facilitates easy and quick stopping of the machine.

It is also an object of the invention to provide novel and simplified means, in connection with the carrier. for obtaining and for regulating the tension on the applied band.

Yet another object of the invention is to eliminate the necessity for bundle clamping means by reason of the mode of application of the band.

Still further objects of the invention reside in means for effecting the automatic stopping of the machine at the end of each band laying cycle.

Other objects of the invention are to be found in the details of construction of the various parts ston, assignors, by mesne assignments, to Albert E.

Cranston, Sr., Oak Grove,

Royal James Cranston Oak Grove, 0reg.,

Oreg. 1945, Serial No. 636,612

of the machine, in their relationship, and in the mode of operation of the machine, as will hereinafter be fully described.

In accomplishing these and other objects of the invention, we have provided the improved details of construction, the preferred forms of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, whereim- Fig. l is an elevation of the machine showing the same as seen from the front or bundle receiving side.

Fig. 2 is a vertical section of the machine, taken on line 2-2 in Fig. 1.

Fig. 2a is a wiring diagram for the electrical equipment of the machine.

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the annular members for driving and for carrying the spool of band forming material and for laying the band about a bundle.

Fig. 4 is a cross sectional detail taken on line 4-4 in Fig. 3, illustrating the band tensioning means.

Figs. 5, 6 and 7 show, diagrammatically, successive steps in the band laying operation.

Fig. 7a is a detail of the band gripper used in conjunction with the slack obtaining means.

Fig. 8 is a top view of the clip applying and band cutting devices, in that position assumed at the start 01' a binding operation.

Fig. 9 is a top view of the same as actuated to finishing position for cutting the band and applying a holding clip.

Figs. 10 and 11 are sectional details of the device, illustrating the action of the gripping jaw that holds the secondary end of the band for the clip applying operation, the section being on line Ill-40 in Fig. 13.

Fig. 12 is a view illustrating the travel of clips from the clip supply magazine to the overlapped end portions or the band and the closing of the clip about the band ends.

Fig. 13 is an end elevation of the clip applying device as seen when looking at it in the direction of the arrow l3 in Fig. 8.

Figs. 14, 15 and 16 are views showing successive steps in the band cutting and securing operations.

Figs. 17 and 18 are enlarged details of the clip closing jaws of the clip applying device, shown in successive positions of closing the clip.

Fig. 19 is an enlarged perspective view showing an open clip and a. clip as applied about the overlapped ends of a band.

Fig. 20 is a detail of the band cutting means.

Briefly described, this machine is of that kind referred to as a semi-automatic machine, in that it operates to mechanically place a band under tension about a bundle and to place the opposite end portions thereof in overlapped relationship so that they may be joined together by the application of a seal or clip to the overlapped portions, while the actual applying of the clip or seal is accomplished by means that are manually actuated.

The mode of operation of this machine requires that the primary end" of the band be extended from the supply of binding material carried on the band laying ring, threaded over a guide sheave carried on the ring, and the slack end manually placed in a gripper. Then, when the band laying ring is set in motion, the slack is taken up and the band is drawn from the supply and is laid under tension about the bundle and a portion thereof, referred to as the secondary end of the band. is brought into overlapped relationship with the primary end portion. Then a clip or seal applying device mounted on the machine, is manually actuated to first grip the secondary end to hold the band tight about the bundle, then to cut the band beyond the gripped portion so as to free the bound bundle from the band supply, then to apply a seal or clip about the said overlapped primary and secondary end portions, thus to secure the band about the bundle.

The machine is driven by an electric motor and each binding operation is started by depressing a foot pedal which closes the motor energizing circuit. A trip member, carried on the band laying ring, actuates a limit switch to open the motor circuit upon completion of the binding cycle, thus to automatically stop the machine in position for the start of the next binding operation.

Referring more in detail to the drawings- The moving and operating parts of the present machine are supported by a frame structure, constructed mainly of channel iron and angle iron members, and of a table-like character comprising a horizontal and rectangular top frame If), supported at a suitable working height by its four corner legs ll these legs being joined at their lower ends across the ends and sides of the frame, by horizontal beams i2. Preferably, but not necessarily, the frame structure is equipped with rollers, or casters, I3, to facilitate the moving of the machine.

Extended across the table top and secured thereto, are spaced, parallel rails |4I4 between which a succession of conveyor rolls 15 are mounted as seen in Fig. 2, for the easy moving of packages thereon, into and from binding position on the table. Along one side of the line of conveyor rolls, a package guide flange I6 is adjustably secured to the top frame and at the other side of the line of rolls, at the receiving side of the machine, a vertical abutment plate i3 is mounted. The plate It is alined with a vertical plate id of considerably larger size, as best understood by reference to Fig. 2. The plates I8 and 19 are rigidly secured on the table top and disposed in the same vertical plane, and have adjacent vertical edges thereof spaced apart, thus to provide a passageway 20 between them, shown best in Fig. 2, for the passing of the band of a bundle, as will presently be understood.

In the use of the present machine, when a. bundle is to be bound, it is manually advanced into position on the conveyor rollers l and placed against the plates I8 and i9, overlapping or across the open space 20 between them; for example, it is located in the position of the package indicated in dotted lines at 25 in Figs. 1 and 2.

Erected on the frame structure of the machine is an arch-like frame member 39 having vertical opposite leg portions, designated at 30' and 30' in Fig. 1, extended through the top portion and to the base or bottom members of the frame and rigidly secured thereto to add rigidity to the structure. This arch transversely spans the roller conveyor on which the bundles are moved, as seen in Fig. l. The leg portions of this arch are joined below the level of the table top by a downwardly formed cross beam 3 i.

Mounted rotatably within the frame formed by the arch member 30 and cross bar 3i, and transversely encircling the conveyor along which the bundles travel, are concentric rings 35 and 3B, of substantial and of practically the same diameter. Each or these rings has a cylindrically formed body portion and an extending peripheral flange at one end thereof; the flanges, as observed in Figs. 2 and 4, being formed on adjacent ends of the cylindrical portions and are of equal outside diameter.

The ring 35 is designated as the band laying ring, and, as best shown in Fig. 2, is supported in its upright position, for rotation, by means of a plurality of circumferentially grooved guide rollers 31 mounted at spaced intervals on the back side of the transverse yoke 30 and cross beam 3|. Likewise, the ring 35, which is designated as the band supply ring, is rotatably supported by a plurality of grooved rollers 38 that are mounted on the forward side of the yoke and cross beam. The conveyor rollers I5, together with guide flange I6 on one side and plates l8 and IS on the other side, thus form a bundle passage extending through the rings 35 and 36.

It is shown in Figs. 1 and 2, that the ring 35 is adapted to be rotatably driven by a pair of parallel belts 4040 which operate about the cylindrical body portion of the ring and about a belt pulley wheel 4| that is fixed on a drive shaft 42. Shaft 42, in turn, is driven by an electric motor 44 operating through a suitable gear reduction mechanism that is designated generally at 45. A belt tightening roller 46 is carried by a lever arm 41 pivoted at 48 to a yoke leg as shown in Fig. 1, and a spring 43 attached to the arm and frame provides the tension that maintains the belt 40 under proper tension. The motor 44 is a one-direction motor and is electrically energized by the closing of a circuit control switch 49. This switch is fixed to a base frame member as in Fig. 2, and its electrical conneclons with the motor and source of supply of current are shown in Fig. 2a.

The motor 44 is automatically deenergized upon the completion of a band laying cycle of ring 35 by the actuation of a limit switch 50. This is fixed to a stationary member of the frame structure of the machine, as seen in Fig. 2, and it is electrically connected in the electrical system as shown in Fig. 2a. The actuation of the limit switch is eifected by a cam plate 5| that is fixed to the ring 35, as seen best in Fig. 3.

In the present instance, we employ a foot pedal as a practical and convenient means for closing the starting switch 49. This comprises a lever 52 that extends substantially horizontally within the base portion of the frame and is pivotally attached, at its inner end, by means of a bolt 52, to a support 53. At its outer end,

which extends forwardly of the machine, the lever has a downturned portion 52a terminating in a horizontal foot pedal 52b. A bracket 55 attached to the lever, extends upwardly and then laterally therefrom to a position in which the circuit closing arm 49' of switch 48, seen in Fig. 2, will be engaged and moved from off to on position upon depression of the foot pedal. When actuating pressure is removed from the foot pedal 52b, the lever will be returned to its normal, lifted position by a spring that is embodied in the switch mechanism or by a spring (not shown) mounted between the horizontal beam 12 and the lever.

The bundle binding material, whether it be metal band, wire, rope or tape. is a continuous strip supplied in spool form and designed to be slipped onto the ring 35 from the forward side of the machine. The strip is here shown in Figs. 2 and 4, as being wound on a cylindrical core 56 of paper or fiber. The supply of binding material thereon is designated at 51. For convenience of description, that portion of the supply of binding material that is extended from the spool to the bundle, is designated by reference char- Fig. 1, this is shown as being secured at its end in a gripper side of the bundle 25 at the outside of plate IB.

After the spool of binding material has been slipped onto the ring 36, it is held thereon by the application of an annular member Bl about the ring and against the spool and securing the latter by applying keys 62 through the ring as seen in Fig. 4.

It is also to be understood that the spool of material is held against turning on the ring 36 in order that a desired tension may be maintained on the band B as applied about a bundle, and this may be accomplished by securing the inner end of the supply 51 to the ring. or securing it to the spool core and then securing the core to the ring. This might be accomplished in various ways, for example, by extending the inner end of the supply of band through the spool core and hooking it in a hole in the ring. The means for laying the band B about a bundie is carried by the ring 35 and comprises a plate 65 that is welded or otherwise rigidly secured to the inner edge of the ring flange. as seen in Figs. 3 and 4, to extend transversely of and closely across the adjacent portion of ring 36 to the forward side of the latter. At its forward end, the plate 65 has an outwardly directed plate 16 fixed thereto and on this plate a flanged sheave wheel 11 is rotatably mounted on an axis that is parallel with the ring axis.

Also fixed to the forward end portion of the plate 65, is an outwardly and rearwardly directed arm 18, which at its end mounts a guide sheave 19 thereon.

In threading the machine for use, the outer end band is drawn from the supply on the wheel 36, passed over the wheels 19 and 11 as noted in described. be understood by reference to Fig. 5. Then, starting with this extended end portion of the band B secured in a gripper adjacent that side of the bundle, the rotation of the ring as indicated by the direction arrows in Figs. 5, 6 and '1, will cause the band B to be drawn from the spool and laid about the bundle.

It will be understood, also, that to accomplish this, the band, as wrapped about the bundle, must be drawn from the supply spool carried on ring 36.

The spool is held against rotation on the ring 36 and therefore it becomes necessary that the ring 36 shall be permitted to turn relative to the ring 35. Therefore, we have provided means for resisting the turning of the ring 36 relative to the ring 35 and in this way place the band under tension as it is wrapped about the bundle. The means for applying this tension and for regulating it will now be explained.

Pivotally fulcrumed on the plate 65 by a pivot bolt 66, as shown in Fig. 4, is a lever 61. One end of the lever has a hole 68 therein, and a pin 69, fixed in the ring 35, extends therethrough and a coiled spring H is applied about the pin between the ring and one end of the lever to urge the forward end of the lever inwardly. This forward end of the lever mounts a brake shoe I2 thereon. The shoe is located in an opening 13 in plate 65 and bears frictionally against the cylindrical body portion of ring 36. It will be understood that the friction between the shoe and ring may be increased or decreased by increasing or decreasing the pressure of the spring H against the lever 61, and that tension on band B may be thus provided and regulated.

The gripper mechanism which is designed to receive and hold the primary end of a band B during a binding operation, is best disclosed in Figs. 13 to 16, wherein it is shown that a bracket is fixed to the outside of plate IB adjacent its top edge and just slightly back of its vertical edge that bounds the passage 20 between plates IB and I9. Pivoted on the bracket, by means of a pivot stud 8|, is a gripping jaw 82 and this is urged to gripping position toward plate l8 by a spring 83 carried in the bracket and bearing against the jaw.

In threading the machine, preparatory to a bundle binding operation, the primary end portion of the band B, after being extended from the spool and passed about the guide sheaves l9 and 11 as seen in Fig. 3, is projected downwardly between the pivoted gripper jaw 82 and plate 18, as illustrated in Fig. 5. The jaw yields downwardly to an open position for reception of the band end but under pressure of spring 83 engages and tightly grips the band when it is pulled upwardly or is placed under tension. In this threading operation, the primary end portion of the band is extended downwardly beyond the jaw 82 a designated distance, as noted in Fig. 14 in order to provide an end portion that may be overlapped by the secondary end portion of the band as subsequently laid about the bundle at the end of the binding cycle preparatory to receiving the clip that secures the overlapped end portions together.

After the primary end portion of the band B has thus been applied to the gripping jaw 82, as shown in Fig. 5, the machine is set in motion, and the ring 35, starting from the position in which it is indicated as being located in Fig. 5, rotates in a clockwise direction through one complete turn, passing through the positions shown in Figs. 6 and '7, and in so doing, it lays the band B, as payed out over the sheave wheel 11, about the four sides of the bundle 25, under tension.

In laying the secondary end portion of the band along that side of the bundle at which the gripping jaw 82 is located, the band is laid across a second gripper member that is designated at smear 85, and which is located at a predetermined distance below the gripper 82. Also, the band B is laid across a shear bar 86 located slightly below the gripper 82 and above gripper 85 and spaced. from the latter as shown. The parts 85 and 86 are mounted on the plate It at positions best shown in Figs. 13 to 16.

The gripper member 05 is in the form of a substantially fiat bar, which, as noted best in Figs. 10 and 11, is horizontally disposed and is formed at one end with a laterally offset hook portion 050. that normally lies in a recess 09 in the plate I8. Adjacent the hook portion, the bar 85 is contained between two stationary jaw members 90-90 secured on plate I8 toward and from which the hook portion 85a may be moved. The function of the two members 90 is to cooperate with the gripper hook 85a for the gripping of the secondary end portion of the band after it has been laid around the bundle and brought to the posi tion of Fig. 14 at which it crosses the hook forming portion of bar 85.

To effect the gripping of the secondary end portion of the band after it has been placed in the position in which it is shown in Figs. 14 and 10, the bar 85 is shifted endwise from the position seen in Fig. 10, to that of Fig. 11, and in this shifting movement, the offset hook portion 85a rides up the cam surface 89' at the base of recess 89 (see Fig. 11) thereby causing the hook end to move outwardly toward the band and to engage therewith and then as the bar-still moves endwise, to hook over the band and draw it edgewise against the jaws 90. There the gripper hook 85a and jaws 90-410 coact to hold that end portion of the band overlapped with the primary end portion during and after the band cutting operation.

The means for shifting the gripper bar 85 as above stated and for actuating the band cutting member, are manually controlled and are associated with and operated in conjunction with the clip applying devices which are shown best in Figs. 8 to 13, and will now be described.

Referring more particularly to Figs. 8 and 9, it will be noted that a triangularly shaped head I is pivoted by a pivot pin IOI extended between vertically spaced ears I02 that are secured on the outside of plate I 8. The head I00 may be swung on its pivot from that position in which it is shown in Fig. 8, referred to as starting position, to the position in which it is shown in Fig. 9. The means whereby the movement of the head is eflfccted, comprises a hand lever I that is pivoted in the head by pivot bolt I00, and the lever may swing relative to the head, through the limited angle that is indicated by the dotted arc I01 in Fig. 9. However, if starting with the parts in the position of Fig. 8, the movement of the hand lever I05 through the angle indicated by the arc II 0 of Fig. 9, will cause the head I03 to swing to the position of Fig. 9, without the hand lever moving relative to the head, or the head moving relative to the handle and it is incident to this movement of the head that the band gripper hook 05a of the bar 85 is caused to move and to engage with and hold the secondary end of the band, as in Fig. 11, and other devices are caused to cut it, as has been shown in Fig. 15, preparatory to application of the clip as shown in Fig. 16.

The operating connection between the lever I05 and head I00 and between the lever and clip applying jaws, is illustrated best in Figs. 1'? and 18, wherein it is shown that the inner end of the lever [05, as pivoted at I06, is connected at opposite sides of the pivot, by links I l2-'-I I2, respectively, to the outer ends of a pair of coacting clip closing and clinching jaw levers II3-II3' that are mounted in the head I00 by pivot pins IM-IH'. The jaw levers have opposedly related jaws I I5I l5 at their inner ends, spaced apart and designed to receive an open preformed clip H6 between them from a clip magazine II'I, seen in Figs. 8, 9 and 13, when the head is in the starting position of Fig. 8. When such a clip is applied between the open jaws, as in Fig. 17, it operates to retain the relative position of the lever to the head while the handle is swung from starting position through the arc III) in Fig. 9.

The clips H8 are automatically fed into the open gripper jaws from the magazine II! that is mounted horizontally on a bracket I I7 secured to the plate I8; this being shown in Fig. 13. The clips are arranged in the magazine in nested relationship, as shown in Fig. 12, and are automatically advanced inwardly in accordance with their use, by pressure of a block "8 against the outer end of the pack of clips. The block is slidable in the magazine, and is pressed forwardly under the pull of a weight H9 that, as shown in Fig. 13, is suspended by a cord I20 that passes from the weight, forwardly along the magazine and over a guide sheave I2I near its inner end. The discharge end of the magazine has a top opening through which the clips may be pushed, one at a time, directly into the open jaws of the clip applying device when in position of Fig. 8.

It is shown in Fig. 2 that the foot pedal lever end of a horizontally disposed lever I23 supported from a bracket I 23' that is fixed in the top frame structure.

At its inner end, the lever I23 is connected by a link I24 with a feed rod I24 which extends upwardly through a guide I Ilg on bracket I I1 (see Fig. 13) to the inner end of the clip magazine and in position to engage the end clip II 6 therein. With each depression of the foot pedal 52, the lever I23 is pivotally actuated and the upper end of the feed rod I24 moves the clip that is loend of the magazine, upwardly for this feeding operation.

When the head I 00, with a clip applied to the jaws as shown in Fig. 17, moves into the position shown in Fig. 9, the open clip IIB will receive the overlapped end portions of the band therein. The travel of the head is then stopped, and therefore the actuation of the hand lever that follows, through the arc I01 of Fig. 9, causes the jaws II5-II5' to close the clip about the band ends as shown in Figs. 18 and 19. The corrugating effect on the clip, as shown in Fig. 19, insures against slippage of the band ends in the clip and it is effected by the shaping of the jaws.

The forward end of the lever I25 is pivotally connected by a short link I30 with a boss III on the bar 05. A roller I32 mounted on pivot pin I33 fixed in the head at a distance spaced somewhat from the pin I26, is adapted to roll alon the outwardly arched edge of lever I25 as the head is swung about the pivot by the hand lever I and in passing therealong, as from the dotted line position, to the fu l line position in Fig. 11, will swing the forward end of the lever inwardly. as in Fig. 11, and through the link I30, will shift the jaw bar 85 endwise to cause the hook end 85a thereof to engage the secondary end of the band B in the gripping action previously described, which takes place prior to the band cuttin and clip applying operations.

When the head I00 is swung back to starting position, the bar 85 is moved to its open or initial position by a spring pressed bolt I36 in a guide I31 fixed to plate I8, as seen in Fig. 11.

The band gripping action above described, takes place just prior to the operation of cutting the secondary end portion of the band. The place of cutting is such as to leave the end of the secondary portion overlapped with that primary end portion that extends below the gripper 82, as has been shown in Fig. 15. The band cutting is accomplished by means shown best in Figs. 8, 9 and 14, which will now be described.

As was previously stated, when the secondary portion of the band is laid about the bundle, it is drawn across the lower gripper jaw 85, the upper gripper 82 and the intermediate shear plate or bar 86, as clearly shown in Fig. 14.

It is shown in Figs. 8. 9 and that a complemental shearing lever I is associated with the fixed shear bar 86. This lever form, as noted best in Fig. 20, and is pivotally mounted by a pivot bolt I4I on a support Hi2 that is fixed to plate I8. On one arm of the bell crank lever is a shear plate I53 that is adapted to coact with the bar 86 to shear off the band when placed between them.

The other arm of the bell crank lever has pivotal connection, at I45, with a short link I46 that, in turn, has a pin and slot, lost motion connection indicated at I41, with the head I00. This lost motion connection is such that the final swinging movement of the head to the position of Fig. 9, causes the linkage to actuate the bell crank lever to cause the shearing of the secondary end portion of the band so that the overlapped end portions will then snap close together, as seen in Fig. 15. When the hand lever I05 and head I00 are swung back to starting position, the linkage causes the shearing jaw to be moved to its open position, as shown in Fig. 8.

It will be explained here that, in view of the fact that the shearing lever I40 lies in or extends through the plane of the band as paid out from sheave 1 1 about the bundle, it is necessary that the secondary end portion of the band, as brought into place, be guided or carried over this lever I40. This is accomplished by use of a metal guide strip I50, shown in Figs. 8 and 9, that is fastened to the outer end of the bell crank lever and is inclined relative to the wrapping plane. When the shearing jaw is in its open position, this guide bar assumes the position as noted in Fig. 8, and it there operates to guide the band as it slides therealong, over the cutter jaw, and after it has passed this guide bar, it snaps across the gripper jaw 85, as in Fig. 10.

After the secondary end of the band has been cut, as previously explained, and the band ends have assumed the close position of Fig. 15, and while both ends of the band are still securely held I00 is of bell crank i the secondary end of i in the gripper jaws 82 and 05, the clip H5 is applied thereto and this is accomplished, as was previously explained, by swinging the lever arm through the arc I01 inFig. 9.

The clips used are of the kind shown in Figs. 12 and 19, each comprising a short metal strap I I6 with opposite end flanges I Ito and H612 bent laterally to form a U-shaped clip, of a well known kind. The swinging of the head I00 from positions of Fig. 17 to that of Fig. 18, places the clip against the band, and the closing of the jaws clinches the ends IIBa-I lib about the band as in Fig. 19, forming a secure connection.

After a band has been applied about a bundle, the secondary end cut, and the clip applied to the overlapped ends, and the head I00 and hand lever I05 restored to starting position, it is only necessary then to push the bundle forward and the band moves off of the edge of plate I8 into the passage 20, thus to free the bundle for removal from the machine.

An important item of this invention, insofar as it concerns the rapid binding of bundles, is the means for insuring a certain amount of slack in the band B to permit a re-threading of the primary end of the band into the gripper 82 without requiring any back dragging or turning of the mechanism which carries the band supply. This will now be explained.

It will be understood, by reference to Fig. '7, that as each binding operation is completed by the placing of the secondary end portion of the band B in overlapped relationship with the primary end portion and the stopping of the band laying ring 35 in the position indicated in Fig. '1, the band B will be drawn against the outside and over the upper end of an upwardly extending arm I60 that is fixed to or formed on the forward vertical edge of the plate I9. This arm is best shown in Figs. 1 and 2.

It is the customary operating procedure that, as the band laying cycle ends, the operator grasps the handle of the lever arm I05 in the left hand, and with his right hand, he grasps that portion of the band which extends downwardly from the arm I60 to the bundle. Then upon the cutting of the band and the application of the clip as in Figs. 15 and 16, this free end of the band supply is disengaged from the arm I60 and thus slack enough in this end portion is provided that the free end, which now becomes the primary end of the next band to be applied, may be fed down between the gripper 82 and plate III to the position shown in Fig. 14. Thus the threading is accomplished without any back dragging of band or reverse turning of the band carrying ring.

To prevent loss of tension on that part of the band between the supply spoo1 and the sheave 11 over which the band is payed out, we have mounted a spring pressed clutch jaw I15 on the plate to coact with the sheave and to engage the band thereon to prevent back slipping.

It has been found advantageous to apply the band sealing clip to the overlapped ends of the band just prior to the stopping of the machine so that the band will be under maximum tension at the time the clip is applied. This is desirable because there is a possibility that after the machine has stopped, it may rebound slightly under the tension of the band.

It is desirable also that means he provided to hold the severed end of the band over the arm I00 until it is desired that the end be applied to the gripper 82 for a binding operation. There- ;fore, we have provided a band gripper, as illustrated in Fig. 7a, on the upper end of arm I60. This gripper is in the nature of a latch bar I80 extended along arm I60 and having its lower end pivotally fixed thereto as at I82. The upper end of the latch bar I80 terminates in a gripper head I83 that overlies and opposedly coacts with the laterally turned upper end of arm I80 to grip the band between them. The top edge of the head is beveled as at I85, and this edge lies in the wrapping plane so that as the band is drawn over the upper end of arm I80 as the carrier moves to the final position, seen in Fig. '7, it engages the beveled edge I85 and presses the latch to one side. Then as the band is drawn to place across the upper end of the arm, the latch bar I80 snaps back to position over the band, as in Fig. 7a, and operates, when the band is cut, to hold the free end on the arm I60 until manually pulled off. Thus it is not in the way and the operator always knows just where to reach for it.

It is desired to call attention to the fact that more than enough slack is provided in this primary end portion than is required for the overlap. Therefore, after the slack primary end has been applied to the gripper 82, there is still slack in that end portion, as is apparent from the showing in Fig. 5. Therefore, when the machine starts a wrapping or bindin operation, it is under no load, there is no inertia to overcome, and it can start easily and fast. Furthermore, at the end of each binding operation, the load is at its maximum, and when the limit switch 50 is opened, the motor will almost instantly stop and no brake is required for this purpose.

An additional advantage is obtained in the mode of binding in the elimination of any r quirement for clamps to hold the bundle in place. It is readily apparent that as soon as tension is placed on the band, as will be understood by reference to Fig. 6, the bundle will be automatically moved tightly against the plate I8 and held secure.

Assuming that the parts are so constructed and assembled as described, the operation of the machine, briefly described, is as follows:

The operator brings a package or box into position for binding by moving it along the conveyor rolls I5, placing the package within the wrapping plane; then the band, B, thread it downwardly between the gripper head 82 and the plate I8 so that its end extends substantially to the lower gripper 85. hen he depresses the foot pedal 52!), thereby closing an electric circuit which results in the energization of the electric motor 44. The motor, operating through the reduction gearing 65 and pulley wheel 4|, drives the bolts 40 and rotates the ring 35 in the clockwise direction indicated by the arrow in Fig. 5. As the ring 35 rotates through one complete turn, it pays out the band B over sheave I1 and lays it about the box or package and brings th secondary end portions of the band into overlapped relationship with the primary end and also lays the band across the upwardly and outwardly extending arm I60, to insure slack for the next threading operation, a shown in Fig. '7.

The machine is stopped automatically after one complete turn of ring 35 by reason of the cam plate on the ring engaging the limit switch 50. The operator then grasps the hand lever I05 with the left hand and the band B at a location between the bundle and the arm I in the other hand. Then he swings the lever he grasps the free end of through switch 49 to cause it to rotate with 12 I05 through the successive arcuate posiidons indicated in Fig. 9, thus first effecting the gripping of the secondary end portion of the band by gripper 85, then the cutting of the band, and finally the application of the clip. He then swings the lever I05 back to starting position. The bundle is then free and is pushed forwardly through the machine and the free end of the band is disengaged from arm I60 and is threaded again into the gripper 02 for the next operation.

In the event that wire is employed as the binding medium, then the joining of primary and secondary end portions would be accomplished by the use of the well known slotted twister gear mechanism, or a twister gear of that kind illustrated and described in the copending application by Albert E. Cranston, Sr, for Wire Binding Machines, Serial No. 713.224, filed November 30. 1946.

If rope is employed, a suitable, form of clip; is applied by means similar to that herein shown.

The general features of the present machine are suitable for the application of gummed tape. Also, for wrapping with band, wire or tape, it is only required that the limit switch be removed so that the ring 35 will turn until stopped, and that the object being wrapped be continuously advanced at a predetermined speed.

In view of the fact that the machine can, as it is here shown, use either wire or band and that the general features are adapted to the use of tape, cord or rope, the term band as used in the claims will be understood to be any one of these possible materials.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim as new therein and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a bundle binding machine, a bundle support, an annular carrier about which a spool of binding material may be fitted and secured. means mounting the carrier for axial rotation, a stationary gripper associated with the bundle support to which the outer end of the band may be extended from a mounted spool and held during a binding operation, a band laying device mounted to revolve about the bundle support and coaxially of the said annular carrier and comprising an element adapted to travel adjacent the periphery of the spool, in reeving contact with the band as extended from the spool to said gripper to lay the band about a bundle located on said support, and means on the band laying device frictionally engaging said annular carrier the said device and to yieldingly resist that relative advance rotation that is caused by the drawing oil of binding material from the spool.

2. In a bundle binding machine, a bundle support, a carrier upon which a spool of binding material may be fitted and secured, a gripper associated with the bundle support to which the outer end of the band as extended from a mounted spool may be anchored for a binding operation, a band laying means mounted to revolve about the bundle support, and comprising an arm adapted to engage the anchored band of binding material as extended from the spool to draw it from the spool and lay it about the bundle as the said band laying means revolves, and means on said arm bearing frlctionally against the said carrier to cause the spool to be rotated with the laying means and to yieldlngly resist the relative advance movement that is caused by the drawing of cable from the spool in the binding operation.

3. A machine as in claim 2 wherein means is provided for adjusting the frictional pressure of the last named means against said carrier to thereby adjust and determine the tension under which the band is laid about the bundle.

4. In a bundle binding machine, a bundle support, a carrier about which a spool of binding material may be fitted and secured, means mounting the said carrier for axial rotation, a gripper adjacent the bundle support to which the outer end of the spooled band of binding material may be extended and held during a, binding operation, a band laying means mounted to revolve coaxially of and adjacent the carrier and including a plate fixed thereto and adapted to travel closely within the carrier, :1, brake shoe on said plate in frictional contact with the carrier to cause it to rotate with said band laying means, and means supported from said plate to engage with the band as extended from th spool to the gripper to cause the band to be drawn from the spool and laid about a bundle on said support as the laying device is revolved, and brought into overlapped relationship with the end portion that is adjacent said gripper for their securement together.

5. In a bundle binding machine, a bundle support, a, carrier about which a spool of binding material may be fitted and secured, means mounting the said carrier for axial rotation, at gripper adjacent the bundle support to which the outer end of the spooled band of binding material may be extended and held during a binding operation, a band laying means mounted to revolve coaxially f the carrier and adjacent thereto and including means in frictional contact with the carrier to cause it to rotate with said strand laying means and to resist relative advance rotation, means for engaging with the band as extended from the spool to the gripper to cause the band to be drawn from the spool and laid under tension about a bundle as the band laying device is revolved, and brought into overlapped relationship with the end portion that is adjacent said gripper, means for joining the overlapped portions, and means for cutting the band adjacent the place of joining to free the bound bundle for removal from the machine.

6. In a bundle binding machine, a bundle support, an annular carrier about which a spool of binding material may be fitted and secured, means mounting the said carrier for axial rotation, a gripper adjacent the bundle support to which the outer end of the spooled band may be extended and held during a binding operation, a driving wheel coaxial and adjacent the annular carrier, braking means mounted on said wheel in frictional contact with the carrier to cause it to rotate with the wheel and relativ advance rotation to be yieldingly resisted, an arm extended from the plate, and receiving means carried by said driving wheel for engaging the band as extended from the spool to cause it to be drawn from the spool and laid under tension about a supported bundle, and brought into overlapped relationship with the gripped end portion for their securement together.

7. In a. bundle binding machine, a bundle support, an annular carrier about which a spool of binding material may be fitted and secured, means mounting the said carrier for axial rotation, a gripper adjacent the bundle support to which the outer end of the spooled band may be extended and held during a binding operation, a driving wheel coaxial and adjacent the annular carrier, a plate fixed to the wheel to travel closely within the annular carrier, a. brak shoe on the plate in frictional contact with the carrier to cause it to rotate with the wheel and relative advance rotation to be yieldingly resisted, an arm extended from the plate, and a wheel on the arm to engage with the band as extended from the spool to cause it to be reeved thereover and drawn from the spool and laid under tension about a supported bundle, and brought into overlapped relationship with the gripped end portion for their securement together.

8. A machine as in claim 6 including also automatic means for stopping the belt driving wheel upon each complete rotation thereof.

9. In a bundle binding machine, an annular carrier about which a spool of binding band may be fitted and secured, means mounting the carrier for axial rotation, a bundle guideway and support passing through the carrier, a, stationary gripper associated with the support to which the outer end of the spooled band may be extended and held during a binding operation, a band laying device comprising an annular member encircling the support adjacent and coaxial of the spool carrier, means on said annular member to cause the carrier to rotate with the band laying device and to restrain it yieldingly against relative advance rotation, means carried by the band laying member over which the band may be reeved from the spool and laid under tension about a bundle on said guideway and in overlapped relation with the gripped end portion, means for joining the overlapped portions, and a cutter adjacent the gripper for cutting the band to release the bound bundle from the band supply.

10. In a bundle binding machine, a bundle sup port, a strand laying means mounted to revolve about said support, a guide sheave carried on said strand laying means, a gripper adjacent the bundle support, a strand of binding material reeved over said sheave and having an end extended to and held by said gripper during a binding operation, power operated means for revolving said strand laying means, means on said strand laying means for interrupting the flow of power after a predetermined angle of rotation of said strand laying means, and a brake carried by said strand laying means to tension said strand and stop the rotation of said strand laying means upon cessation of operation of said power operated means.

11. In a. bundle binding machine, a bundle support, a strand laying means mounted to revolve about said support, a carrier for a coiled supply of strand mounted to revolve about said support, a strand gripping element adjacent said bundle support, a strand of binding material having an end extended to and held by said gripping clement, power operated means for revolving said strand laying means about a supported bundle, means operated by rotation of said strand laying means through a predetermined angle for interrupting the flow of power to said power operated means, and means on said strand laying means adapted to frictionally engage said strand supply carrier to cause said strand to act as a brake for said strand laying means upon interruption of the flow of power.

12. In a bundle binding machine, a bundle support, a strand laying means mounted to revolve about said support, a strand gripping element adjacent said support, a strand of binding material having an end extended to and held by said gripping element, means to exert a driving eflort on said strand laying means to cause it to lay a strand of binding material about a supported bundle, means interposed temporarily in the path of said strand at the completion of each strand laying operation to hold slack in said strand for relieving the strand laying device of load at the start of the next binding operation. brake means on said strand laying means for exerting the maximum load on said strand as the strand laying device approaches its stopping position, and means to interrupt said driving effort when a point on said strand laying device has reached a predetermined position.

13. A bundle binding machine comprising a bundle support, a carrier for mounting a supply of coiled b nding strand with the coil encircling said bundle support and in a relatively fixed position on said carrier, strand laying means mounted to revolve about said bundle support to draw strand from said carrier and lay the strand around a bundle, frictional means on said strand laying means engaging said carrier to cause the carrier to rotate with said strand laying means and. to restrain the carrier yieldingly against relative advance rotation, means for holding portions of said strand in overlapped position after the strand has been laid about a bundle, and means for joining said overlapped portions of the strand.

14. A bundle binding machine comprising a bundle passage adapted for the conveyance of bundles one after another, a carrier for mounting a supply of coiled binding strand with the coil encircling said bundle passage and in a relatively fixed position on said carrier, strand laying means mounted to revolve about said passage to draw strand from said carrier and lay the strand around a bundle in said passage, frictional means on said strand laying means engaging said carrier tocause the carrier to rotate with said strand laying means and to restrain the carrier yieldingly against relative advance rotation, means for holding portions of said strand in overlapped position after the strand has been laid about a bundle, and means for joining said overlapped portions of the strand.

15. A bundle binding machine comprising a carrier arranged for mounting a supply of coiled binding strand in a relatively fixed position thereon, a bundle passage arranged to extend through a coil of binding strand on said carrier for the conveyance of bundles through said coil one after another, strand laying means mounted to revolve about said passage to draw strand from said carrier and lay the strand around a bundle in said passage, frictional means interengaging said strand laying means and carrier to cause the carrier to rotate with said strand laying means and to restrain the carrier yieldingly against relative advance rotation, means for holding free end portions of said strand in overlapped position after the strand has been laid about a bundle, and means for joining said free end portions of the strand.

16. In a bundle binding machine, a rotary ban laying member rotatable always in the same direction for laying a binding band around a bundle, and a slack holding member extending into the path of said band above the bundle at the completion of a band laying operation to hold slack in the band for starting the next band laying operation under no tension without backing up said band laying member.

1'7. In a bundle binding machine, a rotary band laying member rotatable always in the same direction for laying a binding band around a bundie, said band laying operation beginning and ending on one side of the bundle and. said band laying member starting and stopping at a position above the other side of the bundle, and slack holding member extending into the path of said band above the bundle to hold slack in the band after one band laying operation for starting the next band laying operation 18. A bundle binding machine comprising a bundle support, a rotary coil carrier arranged to mount and secure a coil of binding band in fixed relative position thereon encircling said bundle support, rotary band laying means mounted for rotation around said bundle support and arranged to draw said band from said coil, and a irictional element engaging said carrier with said band laying means.

19. A bundle binding machine comprising a bundle support, a rotary ring arranged to mount and secure a spool of binding band in a fixed concentric position thereon encircling said bundie support, band laying means mounted for rotation around bundle support and arranged to draw said band from said spool, and a frictional element engaging said ring with said band laying means.

20. A bundle binding machine comprising a bundle support, a rotary ring arranged to mount and secure a coil of binding band in a fixed concentric position thereon encircling said bundle support, a second rotary ring encircling said bundle support, a driving belt on said second ring, band laying means on said second ring arranged to draw band from said coil, and a frictional element interengaging said two rings to tend to prevent rotation of said first ring faster than said second ring.

21. A bundle binding machine comprising a bundle support, a ring arranged to mount and secure a coil of binding band in a fixed concentric position thereon, a frame having rollers for mounting said ring for rotation encircling said bundle support, a second ring adjacent said first ring mounted in rollers on said frame for rotation encircling said bundle support, a driving belt on said second ring, an arm on said second ring extending through said first ring, band laying means on said arm arranged to draw band from said coil, and a frictional element on said arm engaging said first ring to tend to prevent rotation of said coil faster than said second ring.

22. A bundle binding machine comprising a bundle support, a rotary carrier for mounting a coil of binding band encircling said bundle support, rotary band laying means mounted for rotation around said bundle support and arranged to draw said band from said coil, 21. motor for driving said rotary band laying means, a switch operable by said laying means to deenergize said motor, and friction means engaging said carrier with said band laying means to cause the carrier to rotate with the band laying means and to restrain the carrier yieldably against rcla tive advance rotation.

23. A bundle binding machine comprising a bundle support, rotary band laying means mounted for rotation around a bundle on said support and having a rest position above the bundle after the completion of a band laying operation, and a slack holding member spaced above the top of the bundle and extending into the path of said band at the completion of a band laying operation as said band laying means approaches said 17 rest position, to hold slack in the band for starting the next band laying operation.

24. In a bundle binding machine, a bundle support, a rotary band laying member rotatable always in the same direction about said support for laying a binding band around a bundle on the support, a vertical abutment plate at one side of said bundle support to engage one side of a bundle being bound, and a slack holding member above said one side of the bundle extending into the path of said band at the completion of a band laying operation to hold slack in the band for starting the next band laying operation.

25. In a bundle binding machine, a bundle support having a vertical abutment plate to engage one side of a bundle, band laying means mounted for rotation around a bundle on said support and rotating always in a direction to move away from said abutment plate in passing across the top of the bundle, said band laying means having a rest position above the other side of the bundle for starting and completing a band laying operation, and a slack holding member positioned above said bundle and extending into the path of said band as the band laying means passes across the top of the bundle to hold sufficient slack to allow the band to lay across the top of the bundle without tension when the band is removed from said slack holding member for a subsequent binding operation.

26, In a bundle binding machine, a bundle support having a vertical abutment plate to engage one side of a bundle where a binding operation is to be started and completed, band laying means mounted for rotation around a bundle on said support and rotatable always in the same direction to pass under said support toward said abutment plate then upwardly past said abutment plate and across the top of the bundle to a rest position above the bundle at the side opposite said abutment plate, and a slack holding member extending into the path of said band above said one side of the bundle to engage said band at the completion of a band laying operation and hold slack in the band for starting the next band laying operation.

27. A bundle binding machine comprising a bundle support having a vertical abutment plate to engage one side of a bundle on which a binding operation is to be started and completed, a carrier for a coil of bundle binding band mounted for rotation encircling a bundle on said support, a band laying member mounted for rotation around the bundle and arranged to draw said band from said carrier and lay it about the bundle rotating in a direction to pass under said support toward said abutment plate then upwardly past said abutment plate and across the top of the bundle, and a slack holding mem- 18 ber above said one side of the bundle extending into the path of said band at the completion of a band laying operation to hold slack in the band for starting the next band laying operation.

28. A bundle binding machine comprising a bundle support, a rotary carrier for a coil of binding band encircling said bundle support, rotary band laying means mounted for rotation around said bundle support and arranged to draw band from said coil, frictional means engaging said carrier with said band laying means to cause said carrier to rotate with the band laying means and to restrain the carrier yieldingly against relative advance rotation, and a slack holding member extending into the path of said band at the completion of a band laying operation to hold slack in the band for starting the next band laying operation.

29. A bundle binding machine comprising a bundle support, a rotary carrier for a coil of binding band encircling said bundle support, rotary band laying means mounted for rotation around said bundle support and arranged to draw said band from said coil, a motor for driving said band laying means, a switch operable by said band laying means after one revolution to deenergize said motor, frictional means engaging said carrier with said band laying means to cause the carrier to rotate with the band laying means and to restrain the carrier yieldingly against relative advance rotation, and a slack holding member extending into the path of said band at the completion of a band laying operation when said motor is deenergized to hold slack in the band for starting the next band laying operation.

ALBERT EDWARD CRANSTON. ROYAL JAMES CRANSTON. ALBERT EARL CRANSTON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,152,670 Thompson Sept. 7, 1915 1,513,994 Hugo Nov. 4, 1924 1,632,884 Carter June 21, 1927 2,110,439 Gordon Mar. 8, 1938 2,223,164 Childress Nov. 26, 1940 2,288,088 Harvey June 30, 1942 2,330,629 Schmidt Sept. 28, 1943 2,339,395 Harvey Jan. 18, 1944 2,367,168 Cheesman Jan. 9, 1945 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 452,622 Great Britain Aug. 26, 1936

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Classifications
U.S. Classification100/27, 242/441.2, 53/588, 100/30
International ClassificationB65B13/12, B65B13/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65B13/12
European ClassificationB65B13/12