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Publication numberUS2630755 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 10, 1953
Filing dateAug 15, 1949
Priority dateAug 15, 1949
Publication numberUS 2630755 A, US 2630755A, US-A-2630755, US2630755 A, US2630755A
InventorsHerrin Inez L
Original AssigneeHerrin Inez L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of cutting stencils
US 2630755 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' March 10, 1953 1. L. HERRIN 2,530,755

METHOD OF CUTTING STENCILS Filed Aug. 15, 1949 IN VEN TOR.

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2 claims. .(Cl. 101--128.4)

The present invention relates to stencile in general and more particularly to a new and improved method for cutting stencils usable in the hand painting of designs bn fabrics and the like. More specifically the invention comprises an -im proved method of stencil cutting in which a plurality of stencils, each usable 'for a particular color or colors, are cut in a predetermined manner with respect to each of the other stencils to eliminate spacing between adjacent areas of the finished painted design.

The painting of designs by the use of stencils has become exceedingly popular with amateure and it is possible for them, working accurately and carefully, to paint fabrics and other materials and to obtain a I inished result apprga ching that obtainable by professionals. l-l'eretofore the primary objection to such painting has been that areas of different colors have frequently been spaced by unpainted lines or areasl essentially detracts from the appearanceof the finished worl; and gives visual'eyidence of the lack of skill in the operator. By the use of present method painted areas of difierent colors in the finished product accurately abut one another and the telltale spacing lines are absent. By the use of simple, easily cut stencil the f nished product approaches a professional painting in its appearance. With an appreciation of the problems inherent in the field of cutting stencils, and particularly stencils usable for the hand painting" of designe upon fabrics and similar materials, t is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved method by which stencils can be cut and used sequentially to produce a finished properly related to all other painted areas.

A further object of the invention is to provide a new and improved method ofs tencil cutting in which individual stencils are provided for individual colors to be painted and in which each stencil is cut in a series of steps each of which certain of the other stencils are out simultaneously.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a new and improved method of stencil cutting in which tracing lines on a plurality of stencils defining abutting design areas of -the complete design have their tangent portione c t simultaneously. w

A s ill r e 9. 939. the eteor is is g9- de me at t m r t n w ic dua st nci s ar ami e; :ie e elerie 9i predetermined colored areas which areas abut painted design in which all painted areas are] certain other areas defined by other stencils, characterized in that the lines between the abutting areas of the stencils are cut simultaneously.

l hese and other more specific objects will ap pear upon reading the following specification and claims and upon considering in connection therewith the attached drawing'towhich they relate.

Referring now to the drawing in which is illustrated a pattern and an exemplary series of Stemcils made and usable in accordance with the present method:

Figure 1 comprises a stencil pattern the design areas oi which bear numbers indicating the'steh oil to be cut in accordance therewith;

Figure 2 illustrates the method of superimp sing of stencil No. 1 upon stencil No. 2 andthe simultaneous cutting of the lines between ad'jacent areas defined by each stencil;

Figure 3 is a view of stencil No. 1;'

Figure 4 is a view of stencil No. 2; and

Figure 5 is a view of stencil No.

Itis to be understood thatthe present disclosure is illustrative of the method comprising the present invention and that whereas three stencils are out according to the present disclosure the method is applicable to the cutting of any number of stencils which coop erate to 5m duce the finished design.

Referring first to Figure 1 of the drawing, a stencil pattern is illustrated comprising a simple flower in which the various areas of different color are numbered from 1 to 3. Each "area bearing a particular number will have the same coloring in the final design and, according to'the present method, will be found upon a si' igle sten oil. It is seen'then that three stencils will'be cut in the painting of the design illustrated by the pattern'of Figure 1 carrying out the method it is desirable that a smooth work board, such as a fiberorworid board, be provided which can be penetrated easily by thumb taclgs yet which provides a smooth sur-- face suitable for tracing". A soft lead "pencil should be provided, a sharp stencil kni fe', aunt tacks or push ins, transparent stencil paper "or papers, and a paper punch. With "I l the process can be carried out as herei described. y l M 'Ll he iirst step in the process comprises the cutting of three or more s'hee tjsof Eur; ficiently large as to overlie thepattern of ure 1 t a a gin 49 a 'fsnesf TKS having been done the e e sheets [or'st ncu a ar r i r esed iipob h rti and, fixedly holding the' pattern an d thetni Stencil No. 1 is then superimposed alone upon' the pattern with its three guide holes II in exact alignment with the guide holes ll of the pattern. The various pattern areas numbered- 1 are then traced with the soft lead pencil to provide the outlines illustrated in Figure 3; This having been completed the same operation is performed for the areas numbered 2 and stencil papers 2 and 3, respectively.

In the tracing of each stencil the pattern of Figure l is visible through the transparent paper and the operator simply draws the outline of those areas bearing the reference character corresponding to the number of the stencil paper then being worked upon. 1 I

The operator is then in possession of three stencil papers, each uncut and each provided with disjointed sketches which, when superimposed upon all of the other stencils, produces a figure corresponding to the original pattern.

The operator now superimposes stencil 1 upon stencil 2 and with his stencil knife cuts those portions of the tracing lines which separate abutting numbered areas of the two stencils. Referring specifically to Figure 2, those lengths of lines which will be cut at this time are indicated by solid heavy lines, the remaining uncut line portions of stencil 1 are illustrated by light solid lines, and the uncut line portions of stencil 2 by light dotted lines.

Upon completing the cutting of the heavy solid line portions of Figure 2 the operator will then superimpose stencil 3 upon stencil 1, the openings ll again being aligned, and again cuts the line portions which define adjacent abutting areas. Upon completing this operation he will superimpose stencil 3 upon stencil 2 and perform the same operation. Obviously the order of the superimposing of the various stencils can be varied at will so long as care is exercised to see that each of the stencils is brought into juxtaposition to every other stencil, care being taken. in each case to insure that the paired sheets are exactly aligned by the exact alignment of the punch holes H which, of course, are merely exemplary of aligning indicia which might be used. l

Upon the above steps having been completed the operator has three partially cut stencils, the line portions out being those parts of the enclosing peripheral lines which are tangent to peripheral lines of other stencils.

He then separately cuts with hisstencil knife,

the remaining peripheral lengths of each of the individual designs and, upon removing the cutout areas from the sheets, is provided with three stencils numbered 1, 2 and 3, as illustrated in material to be painted.

He first fixedly secures the fabric or other surface to be painted to the work board as by suitable pins and fixedly secures stencil No. 1 there 3'on I 4 over as by other pins. He then proceeds to re-' produce the punched-out openings ll upon the fabric by moving the pencil point around the interior of each opening. Then using a suitable brush dipped in paint of a suitable quality he covers each of the areas 1 lying below the cutout areas 1 of stencil 1.

Having completed the coloring of the areas underlying the open portions of stencil 1, he sequentially superimposes stencils 2 and 3 upon the fabric, making certain in each instance that the openings II are in accurate alignment with the openings which have been drawn on the material as described. A suitable set of directions can be provided to instruct the user as to colors to be used with each of the stencils or, if desired,

- notations can appear upon the pattern itself.

Upon the painting of the areas underlying the open'parts of each of stencils 1, 2 and 3 the finished product will appear and will correspond to the design illustrated in Figure 1, the various numbered areas being colored in accordance with the color related to-the particular stencil corresponding to the numbered area; Shading can be provided as desired by the use of different colors or shades of colors in a particular cut-out area, but in any event the final result will be characterized by the immediate and exact tangency of each colored area in the painted design with each adjacent colored area, and this despite the fact that the adjacent colored areas of different colors were provided by difierent stencils. As previously indicated, this result follows from the fact that the common line of definition between adjacent areas was cut with a single cut by the operator.

While in the illustrated example of the invention only three stencils have been cut it is to be understood that the process is susceptible of application with a greater or lesser number of cooperating stencils, that the described form is merely illustrative, and that no limitation is intended other than as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

, 1. A process for cutting stencils for use in hand paintingdesigns on surfaces, comprising numbering with the same number all areas of a pattern on a pattern sheet which are to be cut out of a single stencil sheet, numbering a plurality of stencil sheets each with one of the numbers of said areas, superimposing said transparent stencil sheets on said pattern sheet and simultaneously placing aligned positioning markers upon said stencil sheets and pattern sheet, serially superimposing said stencil sheets upon said pattern sheet and tracing on each stencil sheet the boundaries of the areas of said pattern bearing a number corresponding to the stencil sheet number, juxtapositioning each stencil sheet with every other stencil sheet with their markers in alignment and while so positioned in each instancecutting with a cutting stroke penetrating simultaneously the juxtapositioned sheets all common boundary lines lying one above the other on the two sheets, separating said sheets, and, after each stencil sheet has been so paired with every other stencil sheet, cutting individually the uncutportions of the boundaries of the portion of the pattern on each stencil sheet.

2. A process for cutting and using stencils in hand painting designs on surfaces, comprising numbering with the same number all areas of a pattern on a pattern sheet having a color dif- 1-,ferent from an adjacent area of said pattern,

numbering a plurality of stencil sheets each with one of the numbers of said areas, superimposing said transparent stencil sheets on said pattern sheet and simultaneously placing aligned positioning markers upon said stencil sheets and pattern sheet, serially superimposing said stencil sheets upon said pattern sheet and tracing on each stencil sheet the boundaries of the areas of said pattern bearing a number corresponding to the stencil sheet number, juxtapositioning each stencil sheet with every other stencil sheet with their markers in alignment and while so positioned in each instance cutting with a cutting stroke penetrating simultaneously to juxtapositioned sheets all common boundary lines lying one above the other on the two sheets, separating said sheets, and, after each stencil sheet has been so paired with every other stencil sheet, cutting individually the uncut portions of the boundaries of the portion of the pattern on each stencil, superimposing one of said stencil sheets upon 'a fabric to receive the design and outlining thereon positioning markers coinciding with the positioning marker on said one sheet and also painting that portion of the fabric exposed by the partial pattern of said one sheet, removing said one sheet and thereafter sequentially superimposing 6 said stencil sheets on said fabric with the positioning markers thereon coinciding in each case with the positioning markers on said fabric, and with each sheet so positioned on said fabric painting that portion of the fabric exposed by the cutout portion of the pattern on that sheet.

INEZ L. HEREIN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS OTHER REFERENCES Modern Photoengraving, by Flader and Mertle, Modern Photoengraving Publishers, Chicago, Ill. See pp. 140-141 on Inserting.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US875106 *Apr 13, 1906Dec 31, 1907Albert George PirkisApparatus for stenciling designs on post-cards, &c.
US1520555 *Sep 20, 1922Dec 23, 1924Lillian AuldToy figure
US1541480 *Nov 26, 1923Jun 9, 1925Compton Marshall STransparent stencil
US1914126 *Oct 16, 1930Jun 13, 1933William C HuebnerProcess of preparing printing films
US2189550 *Dec 30, 1938Feb 6, 1940Brown Higgins RobertaCut-out toy
US2278771 *Nov 3, 1938Apr 7, 1942Joseph Csaszar PaulStencil for and process of printing
US2357310 *Apr 28, 1942Sep 5, 1944Burchell Holloway CorpApparatus for making designs
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2876575 *Oct 11, 1957Mar 10, 1959Walter LeikaMethod of making greeting cards and pictures
US3091020 *Jul 30, 1957May 28, 1963Strzalkowski Charles WEyeglass hearing aid and method of manufacture
US3987725 *Mar 18, 1974Oct 26, 1976Transaction Technology, Inc.Process of screen manufacture and use for coding credit cards
US4520730 *Nov 10, 1982Jun 4, 1985CebalPresetting process for printing cylindrical or conical articles
US5654056 *Oct 7, 1994Aug 5, 1997Intasco CorporationPaint mask and method for making same
US6349640 *Jul 31, 2000Feb 26, 2002Annex Japan Co., Ltd.Seal type composite stencil and plychrome picture forming method
US7156017 *Apr 25, 2006Jan 2, 2007Robert Louis IngraselinoMethod creating a picture by different layered stencils
US7225733 *Feb 5, 2006Jun 5, 2007Grass Graffiti, LlcMaking stencils for creating artistic works on residential lawns
US7334518Nov 2, 2005Feb 26, 2008Grass Graffiti, LlcKits for creating artistic works on residential lawns
US7347142Feb 5, 2006Mar 25, 2008Grass Graffiti, LlcMethod for creating artistic works on residential lawns
US7806049 *Dec 18, 2008Oct 5, 2010Grass Graffiti, LlcKit for creating artistic work on lawn
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/128.4, 101/129, 427/143, 101/115, 156/248, 427/282
International ClassificationB05C17/00, B05C17/06
Cooperative ClassificationB05C17/06
European ClassificationB05C17/06