Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2632919 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 31, 1953
Filing dateMay 31, 1951
Priority dateMay 31, 1951
Publication numberUS 2632919 A, US 2632919A, US-A-2632919, US2632919 A, US2632919A
InventorsKoehler Carl J
Original AssigneeKoehler Carl J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for producing mineral wool
US 2632919 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 31, 1953 c; J. KOEHLER METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING MINERAL WOOL Filed May 51, 1951 INVENTOR. Car/ J h oe/zler 'BY 9 am M ia Patented Mar. 31 1953 pUNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING MINERAL WOOL Carl J. Koehler, Tonawanda, N. Y.

Application May 31, 1951, Serial No. 229,109

' verted into fibers by subjecting a molten stream of the slag to a disintegrating blast of high pressure steam. Mineral wool produced in this general manner is known in the art as blown wool.

I An alternative means of converting molten mineral material into wool or fibers is by directing the molten material against the surfaces of high speed rotors from which the material is thrown or spun by centrifugal force, this force being such that the material is drawn out into fiber, thread or strand form.

Certain advantages of fineness, uniformity and relative freedom from objectionable pellets known as "shot are attainable in this latter process which is called spinning and produces what the art terms spun wool." However, the attainment of these benefits by spinning the wool instead of blowing is not without its technical difficulties, due in part to the nicety of control and thejpractical necessity of converting economical percentages of the molten slag into fibers.

' The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for spinning mineral wool in an improved manner which employs a simpler apparatus, and produces a higher yield of spun fiber of'good quality and fineness. The apparatus of the present invention is such that plural cooperating rotors contribute to the production of fiber from a single slag stream with relative freedom from interference between the slag stream and the fibers being formed and with maximum fiber production.

In spinning mineral wool fibers by throwing the material from rapidly rotating rotors under centrifugal force a system of two or more rotating bodies or wheels is most commonly employed. A-stream of molten slag falls onto the surface of one wheel or rotor whereupon a certain part of the slag adheres to the surface of that wheel and the remainder or excess is thrown onto the next wheel in the system, the several wheels being properly positioned to receive the thus-deflected stream of excess molten slag. This processis' repeated on each successive wheel surface until there is no remainder or excess of slag.

7 Claims (01. 18-25) The part of the slag that adheres to the wheel in each case forms an incandescent ring of molten slag around the wheel from which numerous globules of melt are thrown by centrifugal force to produce fibers from the still viscous molten slag. This centrifugal production of fibers takes place around the full circumference of the wheel.

In prior art attempts to produce spun wool whenevermore than one revolving body or rotor has been used, the direction of rotation of each successive rotor has been opposite to that of the.

preceding rotor in the system. I have found that highly novel and superior results are obtained when all of the rotors are caused to revolve in the same direction, that is, all clockwise or all counterclockwise.

In prior art proposals this possibility has not been exploited. This failure may be attributed in part to two factors; first, the belief that a multiple rotor system must, in throwing slag from one rotor, accelerate it in the direction of movement of the periphery of the other rotor; and, second, the difficulty of arranging multiple rotors in such a way that they can be effectively rotated in the same direction and still properly receive the slag streams and spin wool.'

The present invention provides a rotor arrangement which permits the use of three successive rotors operating in the same direction and I have found that, with this arrangement and with the slag streams directed against successive rotors in a novel manner, the rate of fiber production of a system of three wheels, all rotating in the same direction, is about equivalent to the rate of fiber production of systems in which it is necessary to employ four successive alternately rotating wheels or rotors to consume the deposited slag.

Previous prior art proposals have been based upon an assumed theory that the acceleration of the mineral melt from one wheel to the next and an accumulation or buildup of such acceleration is beneficial to the efiiciency of the spinning process. I have found that the acceleration, per se, is not the important element but that the forceful application of the mineral melt to and against the rotating surface is very important. The effect of increasing the force of impingement is achieved, in one instance, by caus-' ing the melt to strike the wheels at an anglev greater than degrees to the tangent, or in such a manner that the direction of movement. of the melt upon impingement is to some extent reversed. It is believed that the conception of this principle is responsible in an important part for the superior results obtained by the present apparatus and method.

In the accompanying drawing and the following specification one form of apparatus and one method of procedure according to the present invention is set forth by way of example. It is to be understood, however, that this method and apparatus is merely illustrative and the principles of the present invention are subject to many variations Without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a general schematic front elevational view of one form of the rotor arrangement of the present invention viewed from the side toward which the spun wool is ultimately blown; and

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the apparatus of Fig. 1.

Like characters of reference denote like parts and, referring particularly to Fig. l, the numeral I designates a melting furnace for supplying molten slag and any suitable type of cupola may be employed. The numeral II designates a discharge trough or spout through which a molten stream I3 of rock, slag, glass or mixtures thereof or other materials in a fluid state and suitable for conversion into mineral wool, glass wool, and like fibrous material by spinning, is conducted.

The rotors for fiber spinning are disposed beneath the trough I I in position to intercept the falling stream l3 of molten material. The rotors receive and act upon the slag in a more or less successive manner and the rotors are, in their successive order of operation, designated I5, I6, and I1.

It will be noted from Fig. 1 that the stream of molten slag I3 falls to the periphery of rotor I5 in such manner that it is moving partially in the direction of movement of the periphery of the rotor. However, in the case of the impingement of slag against rotors I6 and I1, successively, the angle of impingement of the slag against their peripheries is somewhat the reverse from that in the case of rotor I5. A line A extends from the axis of rotor I6 tangent to the periphery of rotor I5, and it will be noted that the somewhat fan-shaped stream of excess slag thrown from rotor I5 to rotor I6 strikes the latter behind this line A so that the direction of movement of the slag stream is, to some extent, reversed upon impingement of the periphery of rotor I6.

The construction line B extending from the center of rotor I1 and tangent to the periphery of rotor I6 shows substantially the same condition with respect to excess molten slag thrown from rotor I6 to rotor H.

The rotors I5, I6, and I! have mounting and rotating shafts 20, 2|, and 22, respectively, and the bearing and support means for the shafts and their driving means are conventional and need not be illustrated herein. The rotors may be belt connected in the manner heretofore practiced in this art, the only requirement being that all three rotors rotate in the same direction.

It will be noted that the shafts ZI and 22 of rotors I6 and I! are parallel and in alignment but extend at a slight angle to the shaft 26 of rotor l5 as viewed in plan. Accordingly a, vertical plane through rotors I6 and I! at right angles tov their axes, as indicated at C in Fig. 2, does not intersect the slag stream I3. which falls to the first rotor I5 at substantially the point 4 marked D in Fig. 2. Thus the slag stream and the streams of spun wool extending from the peripheries of rotors I6 and I! do not interfere with each other in any Way.

It is to be understood that a certain amount of the slag falling to rotor l5 clings to its periphery temporarily while the remainder is immediately deflected and fiung to or thrown against the periphery of rotor I6. The slag which thus temporarily clings to rotor I5 appears thereon as an incandescent ring extending about its periphery with spun fibers emanating therefrom at all points about the periphery of the rotor quite uniformly. The same division of or a similar division of the slag occurs at rotor I6, whereas the slag thrown from rotor I6 to rotor I! has attenuated in volume at a point where substantially all of the remaining slag clings temporarily to rotor I1 and is converted into fibers.

The rotors are preferably provided with peripheral grooves as at 24 and 25 in Fig. 2. While subject to considerable variation, V-grooves 1: inch Wide and 1 5' inch deep have operated in a satisfactory manner.

Merely by way of example and to set forth a single full embodiment of the method and apparatus of the present invention, the rotors I5, I6,

and I'I'have operated within a fully satisfactory manner when their diameters were each about 9 inches, their face widths each about 4 inches, and their speeds of rotation each about- 5000 R. P. M. or greater. Increases in peripheral It is generally inherent in the rotor arrangement of the present invention, with three rotors rotating in the same direction whether that direction be all clockwise or all counterclockwise, that the excess slag from the second rotor will be thrown generally upwardly to the third rotor, the latter being disposed with its axis somewhat higher than the axes of the first two rotors.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for spinning fibers from molten material comprising three successively acting generally cylindrical rotors having facing peripheral portions, means for rotating said rotors at relatively high speed in a common direction of rotation, means for dropping molten material on the upper portion of the periphery of one of said rotors, the second rotor being disposed laterally of said one rotor in the direction of rotagenerally cylindrical rotors having facing peripheral portions, means for rotating said rotorsv at relatively high speed in a common direction of rotation, means for dropping molten material on the upper portion of the periphery of one of said rotors, the second rotor being disposed laterally of said one rotor in the direction of rotation of the upper part of said one rotor to receive excess molten material from the first rotor,

and the third of said rotors being disposed gen--.'

erally above said second rotor to receive the excess molten material therefrom, said second and third rotors being substantially coplanar and at an angle to the plane of the first rotor whereby the fiber spun by said second and third rotors is not in interference with molten material dropping to the first rotor.

3. Apparatus for spinning fibers from molten material comprising three successively acting rotors having facing peripheral portions, means for rotating said rotors at relatively high speed in a common direction of rotation, means for dropping molten material on the upper portion of the periphery of one of said rotors, the second rotor being disposed laterally of said one rotor in the direction of rotation of the upper part of said one rotor to receive excess molten material from the first rotor, and the third of said rotors being disposed generally above said second rotor to receive the excess molten material therefrom.

4. Apparatus for spinning fibers from molten material comprising three successively acting generally cylindrical rotors having facing peripheral portions, means for rotating said rotors at relatively high speed in a common direction of rotation, means for dropping molten material on the upper portion of the periphery of one of said rotors, the second rotor being disposed laterally of said one rotor in the direction of rotation of the upper part of said one rotor with its axis approximately intersecting a line tangent to the first rotor at the point where the molten materialis dropped thereon to receive excess molten material from the first rotor, and the third of said rotors being disposed generally above said second rotor with its axis approximately intersecting a line substantially at right angles to said tangent to receive the excess molten material therefrom.

5. Apparatus for spinning fibers from molten material comprising three successively acting rotors having facing peripheral portions, means for rotating said rotors at relatively high speed in a common direction of rotation, means for dropping molten material on the upper portion of the periphery of one of said rotors, the second rotor being disposed laterally of said one rotor in the direction of rotation of the upper part of said one rotor with its axis approximately intersecting a line tangent to the first rotor at the point where the molten material is dropped thereon to receive excess molten material from the first rotor, and the third of said rotors being disposed generally above said second rotor with its axis approximately intersecting a line substantially at right angles to said tangent to receive the excess molten material therefrom.

6. A method of making mineral wool from a molten mineral material comprising discharging a falling stream of the molten material against the upper peripheral portion of a generally cylindrical rotor while rotating the same at a relatively high velocity to form an incandescent ring of molten material thereon from a portion of said material, discharging the remainder of said material from the first rotor against the peripheral surface of a second rotor in a direction generally perpendicular to the receiving peripheral surface while rotating said second rotor at a relatively high velocity in the same direction as the first rotor to form an incandescent ring on the second rotor from a portion of the material so discharged, and discharging the remainder of the material from the second rotor against the peripheral surface of a third rotor in a direction generally perpendicular to the receiving peripheral surface while rotating said third rotor at a relatively high velocity in the same direction as the second rotor to form an incandescent ring on said third rotor from substantially the remainder of said molten material.

'7. A method of making mineral wool from a molten mineral material comprising discharging a fallingstream of the molten material against the upper peripheral portion of a generally cylindrical rotor while rotating the same at a relatively high velocity to form an incandescent ring of molten material thereon from a portion of said material, discharging the remainder of said material from the first rotor against the peripheral surface of a second rotor in a direction somewhat opposed to the direction of movement of the receiving peripheral surface while rotating said second rotor at a relatively high velocity in the same direction as the first rotor to form an incandescent ring on the second rotor from a portion of the material so discharged, and discharging the remainder of the material from the second rotor against the peripheral surface of a third rotor in a direction somewhat opposed to the direction of movement of the receiving peripheral surface while rotating said third rotor at a relatively high velocity in the same direction as the second rotor to form an incandescent ring on said third rotor from substantially the remainder of said molten material.

CARL J. KOEI-ILER.

REFERENCES CITED The following referencesare of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 521,371 Hewitt June 12, 1894 2,520,168 Powell Aug. 29, 1950 2,520,169 Powell Aug. 29, 1950

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US521371 *Jun 12, 1894 hewitt
US2520168 *Sep 22, 1944Aug 29, 1950Johns ManvilleMethod and apparatus for fiberizing molten material
US2520169 *Sep 29, 1948Aug 29, 1950Johns ManvilleMethod and apparatus for fiberizing molten material
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4119421 *Jun 7, 1977Oct 10, 1978Rockwool AktiebolagetArrangement for fibration of molten mineral
US4238213 *Apr 5, 1979Dec 9, 1980Johns-Manville CorporationMethod of operation of a refractory fiber production process
US5954852 *Dec 1, 1995Sep 21, 1999Rockwool International A/SMethod of making fibers from mineral melts which have a viscosity of not more than 18 poise at 1400 C.
DE1063512B *Feb 27, 1958Aug 13, 1959Johns ManvilleVorrichtung zur Herstellung von Schlackenwolle
Classifications
U.S. Classification65/469, 65/520
International ClassificationC03B37/05, C03B37/04
Cooperative ClassificationC03B37/055
European ClassificationC03B37/05B