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Publication numberUS2633009 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 31, 1953
Filing dateSep 30, 1949
Priority dateFeb 10, 1949
Also published asDE822538C, DE959545C, DE1016681B, USRE24109
Publication numberUS 2633009 A, US 2633009A, US-A-2633009, US2633009 A, US2633009A
InventorsSteverlynck Baldewijn
Original AssigneeGroeninghe Ververij P V B A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for the treatment of textile materials at elevated temperatures
US 2633009 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 31, 1953 B. STEVERLYNCK 2,633,009

APPARATUS FOR THE TREATMENT OF TEXTILE MATERIALS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES Filed Sept. 30, 1949 Pf u , the treatment of textile materials Patented Mar. 31, 1953 APPARATUS FOR THE TREATMENT OF TEX- TILE MATERIALS AT PERATURES ELEVATED TEM- Baldewijn Steverlynck, Kortrijk, Belgium, as-

signor to Groeninghe Ververij P. V. B. A.,

Courtrai, Belgium Application September 30, 1949, Serial No. 118,842 In the Netherlands February 10, 1949 2 Claims. (Cl. 68-184) 1 The present invention relate to a machine for (dyeing, bleaching, impregnating, sizing, etc.) in overpressurized closed apparatus.

The dyeing machines actually on the market present two major drawbacks, inherent to their design.

The circulation in the dye baths depends on a centrifugal pump or a pump of a different type, so that the material to be dyed is necessarily compressed by the pressure of the liquor. It will be easily understood that the higher the circu-lation pressure, the more the material will be compressed and the more 'difiicult will be the circulation of the dye baths.

n the other hand, most dyeings are effected at a temperature approaching the boiling point. It is, however, generally admittedthat the output of centrifugal pumps is greatly reduced, when the dye baths near the boiling temperature. As a consequence, the circulation in boiling dye baths is considerably reduced, with the result of extending the duration of the dyeing.

These two drawbacks are totally eliminated by the new machine which constitutes the subject matter of the present invention.

The new apparatus allows an abatement to 50% of the pressure and output of the pumps of the machines and results in a considerable saving of time required for the dyeing. The dyeing material is never distorted, be it material in raw stock or on tops, packages, beams, cakes, or the like, and it remains soft, thus favoring the penetration of the dye baths to a remarkable extent and allowing a considerable reduction of time for the dyeing operation.

Furthermore, the use of the lowest possible pump pressure tends to inhibit the formation of channels through which the liquor would pass without penetrating the dyeing material properly.

This achievement is attained in a very simple manner, merely by applying a constant overpressure during the dyeing operation by means of a balance tank which is preferably connected to the suction side of the pump. This overpressure is provided either by expanding the dye bath through heating or by introducing a compressed gas into the upper part of the balance tank.

This tank is provided with a water level for permanent control of its contents and also has on its top portion a valve, with a funnel located above the valve and through which dye- '2 stuffs and other substances may eventually be fed to the tank while dyeing is in progress.

The balance tank which is always half empty prevents disruption of the machine and, through its cushion of compressed air, it exercises an elastic pressure on the suction side of the pump, thus reducing formation of vapor. This improves the output of the circulation pump, as compared with prior art atmospheric dyeing machines, in an extraordinary way even when approaching the boiling temperature. As the circuit is completely closed, temperature of 110 C. and higher are easily reached without disturbing the proper operation of the pump, the pipes or other parts of the machine, for the pressure resulting from the rise in temperature prevents boiling of the dye bath. Moreover, any unwanted intake of air through the packing on the suction side of the pump is avoided by the effect of the overpressure.

Dyestuffs and other substances may be easily added to the dye bath by closing the lower valve of the balance tank, without stopping the circulation or having to drop the machine pressure.

The possibility of heating dye baths at temperatures over C. allows, in most cases, to obtain a dispersion of the dyestuffs in a very short time and in a proportion never before attained. It also makes possible the dyeing of the newest synthetic fibres to a high degree of fastness.

A heat exchanger connected to the feed side of the pump is used for heating of the dye baths.

' This exchanger has been so designed as to serve eventually to cool off the baths by means of cold water circulation, thus providingfor the dyer the possibility of varying the temperature of the dye baths during the dyeing operation as he deems it necessary. In that case compressed air or gas may be fed to the upper part of the balance tank in order to make it possible to keep the machine under static pressure while dyeing is in progress.

The result of dyeing under overpressure or at high temperature is a perfect penetration of the dyeing materials, even of the most refractory ones, and an excellent levelling on delicate materials, such as cakes of rayon of the finest denier, merc'erized cotton on packages, spun staples, beams, yarn or hanks, etc., within a very short time.

The essential characteristics of the improved machine which is the object of the present invention will be more clearly explained, by way of example only, in the following description.

In the accompanying drawing the machine has been diagrammatically illustrated in perspective view.

The machine as illustrated is in part known but has certain devices that make it possible to bring the textile masses in the dye vat under a static pressure.

The machine includes a dye vat I which is generally in use in the dyeing industry, a circulation pump 3, and a double or four-way valve 4, the latter being connected through pipes 5 and 6 to vat I. A pipe I connects the four-way valve 4 and the pump 3 whereas a pipe 8 links the valve 4 with the pump 3, with the heat exchanger 2 between them. The balance tank (expansion vat) II may be connected to a compressor Iii over a valve Illa. The balance tank is also connected to the suction side of the pump 3. The inlet and exhaust pipes of the balance tank are provided withv valves I2 and I3, respectively, and, to facilitate the addition to the tank of water or active substances, the inlet pipe is provided with a funnel I4. Furthermore, the balance tank is also fitted with a water gauge It for the constant control of its contents, a safety valve IIa, a'pressure gauge I9 and an air release valve I3.

There is also an air valve I! on top of the dye vat I.

In operation, the active substances and the fibres to be subjected to the treatment are introduced into the dye vat I, and the latter is tightly closed. The pump 3 is then set in motion, and the liquor circulates through the vat in one or the other direction, according to the position of the four-way valve. Then, in order to create a static pressure of 0.5 to atm. in the circulation system and consequently also in the dye vat I, the balance tank II is connected to a suitable pressure source, for example, to a pressure-filled gas bottle Ill.

The same balance tank is also used to add active substances or liquid to the circulation system while the dyeing is proceeding. For this purpose the valve I3 is closed and the valve I2 is opened. After the addition of the liquid the valve I2 is closed and the valve I3 is opened again, to as to allow the content of the tank II to flow into the circulation system. By way of example, pressure gas may be introduced at the top of the tank and at the same time some liquor may be allowed to escape through valve II. Obviously, other suitable means may be used to attain the same objectives.

The heat exchanger 2 has been provided to warm up or cool off the circulation liquor. It has two valves, one for adding steam and the other for adding cold water.

The directions which the processing liquor is able to follow are indicated by full line and. dotted arrows.

What I claim is:

1. An apparatus for treating textile material, and particularly for dyeing such textile material inan aqueous bath at temperatures close to and above (3., said apparatus comprising, in combination, a substantially hermetically closed vat, a circulating pump, a double valve, pipes connecting said double valve with the inlet and outlet of said vat, liquid circulating means connecting said double valve with the inlet and outlet of said pump whereby said means and said pipes constitute a closed main circulation circuit between said vat and said pump, a closed balance tank situated outside of said circuit, means upon the top of said balance tank for supplying a liquid thereto, whereby said balance tank also serves as a supply vessel, a pipe connecting the bottom of said balance tank with the firstmentioned means adjacent to the inlet of said pump, a single valve carried by the last mentioned pipe, and means supplying at will compressed gas to the top of said closed balance tank.

2. An apparatus for treating textile material, and particularly for dyeing such textile material in an aqueous bath at temperatures close to and above 100 0., said apparatus comprising, in combination, a substantially hermetically closed vat, a circulating pump, a double valve, pipes connecting said double valve with the inlet and outlet of said vat, liquid circulating means connecting said double valve with the inlet and outlet of said pump and including a heat exchanger located between the outlet of said pump and said double valve, whereby said means and said pipes constitute a closed main circulation circuit between said vat and said pump, a closed balance tank situated outside of said circuit, means upon the top of said balance tank for supplying a liquid thereto, whereby said balance tank also serves as a supply vessel, a pipe connecting the bottom of said balance tank with the first-mentioned means adjacent to the inlet of said pump, a single valve carried by the last-mentioned pipe, and means supplying at will compressed gas to the top of said closed balance tank.

BALDETWIJN STEVERLYNCK.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 829,188 Weiss Aug. 21, 1906 898,444 Detre Sept. 15, 1908 1,155,946 Miller Oct. 5, 1915 1,799,421 Hornbuckle Apr. 7, 1931 2,227,926 Drum Jan. 7, 1941 2,409,518 Smith Oct. 15, 1946 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 656,743 France May 28, 1929

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US829188 *Oct 2, 1901Aug 21, 1906Robert WeissApparatus for treating textile materials.
US898444 *May 4, 1905Sep 15, 1908Leon DetreApparatus for subjecting materials to the action of liquids under pressure.
US1155946 *Jun 26, 1914Oct 5, 1915Shrewsbury B MillerCombined vacuum washing and wringing machine.
US1799421 *Dec 6, 1924Apr 7, 1931Craig Robert FBeam dyeing machine
US2227926 *Jun 8, 1938Jan 7, 1941Smith Drum And CompanyCirculating system for material treating
US2409518 *Dec 5, 1942Oct 15, 1946Western Electric CoCarrier structure
FR666743A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2845787 *May 26, 1955Aug 5, 1958Dexdale Hosiery MillsApparatus for the fluid treatment of textile materials
US3030791 *Sep 25, 1959Apr 24, 1962Jesse MayPiece dyeing machine
US3128617 *Jun 22, 1961Apr 14, 1964Deering Milliken Res CorpFluid treating apparatus
US3166923 *Sep 12, 1963Jan 26, 1965Zacks LtdDry cleaning apparatus
US3364705 *Sep 13, 1965Jan 23, 1968British Cotton & Wool Dyers AsApparatus for treating textile materials
US4538432 *Dec 29, 1983Sep 3, 1985Milliken Research CorporationOptimum pressure control
US6233982 *Apr 4, 1996May 22, 2001Thies AgMethod and device for the treatment of ready-to-wear, textile apparel parts
Classifications
U.S. Classification68/184, 68/207
International ClassificationD06P1/22, D06B5/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06B2700/18, D06P1/224, D06B5/00
European ClassificationD06B5/00, D06P1/22P