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Publication numberUS2634102 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 7, 1953
Filing dateSep 6, 1949
Priority dateSep 6, 1949
Publication numberUS 2634102 A, US 2634102A, US-A-2634102, US2634102 A, US2634102A
InventorsHoward Clifford M
Original AssigneeHoward Clifford M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Longitudinally striking oil well jar
US 2634102 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Apr. 7, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE LONGITUDINALLY STRIKING OIL WELL J AR Clifford M. Howard, Fontana, Calif. Application September 6, 1949, Serial No. 114,191

(Cl. Z55- 27) 9 Claims.

This invention relates to an oil well jar and used particularly in the rotary drilling of lan oil well and the prime object of my invention is to provide a novel jar which strikes longitudinally of the jar body and which will strike upwardly with great force to loosen an object which might be stuck in the bore of the well.

A feature of my invention is to provide a novel jar` of the character stated, which in collapsed position is so coupled that the bottom sub or tool can be attached to the lost object in the well. This coupling in extended position of the tool is released to permit free rotation of the upper portion of the jar.

Another object of my invention is to provide a novel means of releasably securing the striking piston to the mandrel, which is secured to the lost object.

Still'another object of my invention is to provide a novel means of adjusting spring tension in the jar when it is in the bore of the well and attached to the lost object.

y Still another feature of my invention is to provide a novel jar of the character stated, which alsol utilizes the hydro-static fluid head in the well in causing the piston to jar upwardly against the lost object.

Still another featurel of my invention is to provide a novel jar of the character stated, in which spring tension is maintained on the lost object while the 4piston is striking upwardly to jar this object loose.

Other objects, advantages and features of invention lmay appear from 'the accompanying drawing, the subjoined detailed description and the appended claims.

, in the drawing: i `Figure 1 is a. longitudinal sectional view of myV jar in collapsed position.

Figure 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of my jar inextended position and about to trip.

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken on line 3-3 of Figure 1.

vFigure 4 is a sectional View (taken on line 4-4 ofv Figure 1.

Figure 5 is a sectional view taken on line 5--5 of Figure 1, and with the sliding ring removed.

Figure 6 is a sectional view taken on line 6-6 of Figure 1.

Figure 7 is a-sectional view taken on line 'I -l of Figure l.

Figure 8 is a fragmentary transverse sectional view of the releasable catch means for the piston.

Figure 9 is a fragmentary longitudinal secitional view of the mandrel and one of the tapered dogs mounted therein.

. and when the bottom LiO which is usual and well known in the art. A barrel 2 extends downwardly from the coupling I. The barrel 2 terminates at the bottom in an internally splined boss 3, this boss also having a top shoulder ai, and the purpose of these parts will be further described.

A sub 5 is attached to the lower end of a mandrel 6, which extends into the barrel 2 and eX- tends longitudinally thereof. The mandrel t is provided with external splines 1, which iit into the internal splines of the boss 3. The mandrel B is tubular so that circulating fluid can pass longitudinally through the tool. The upper end of the mandrel 6 is packed off in the coupling I by suitable packing 8. The mandrel 6 has a limited longitudinal `movement within the barrel 2 and this longitudinal movement compresses the actuating springs and also trips the latching mechanism, as follows:

A ange 9 is provided on the mandrel 6 and is spaced above the splines 'I. A nut Ill screws on to the outside of the mandrel S and is provided with a tooth II, which ts in a groove I2 on the inside of the harrel 2, thus if the mandrel 6 is held stationary and if the barrel 2 is rotated the nut I will move up or down on the mandrel 6 to compress a spring I3, which seats against the nut I0 and against a sliding ring i4 on the inside of the barrel 2. A plurality of tapered dogs I5 are each provided with a depending pin I, which pin projects downwardly through the flange 9, of these pins strike the shoulder Il the dogs I5 will be pushed upwardly, thus camming the ring III against the inside of tthe barrel 2 and holding this ring stationary. The pins I6 are rectangular in cross-section, thus holding the dogs liagainst rotation as long as the pins are in the collar 9. g The spring I3 then pushes upwardly on `the nut I0 and maintains a constant upward tension on the mandrel 6, the sub 5 and the lost object to which the sub is attached. AIf it is desired to increase the tension of the spring i3 the `barrel 2 is rotated to the right, this threads the nut I0 downwardly on the mandrel 6 to further compress the spring I3. A piston I'I surrounds the mandrel 6 and slides vertically thereon and in the upward position of the piston I'I it strikes against the `bottom of the coupling I, thus creating an upward jar, which is transmitted through the barrel 2 to the boss 3, thence to the iiange 9, and tok the mandrel 6 and sub 5. The piston I'I is provided with rings I3 to prevent leakage past this piston. A heavy spring IS bears against the bottom of the piston Il and also against a fixed stop 20 on the inside of the barrel 2. The spring I9 urges the piston l1 upwardly` against thebottom of the coupling y.l to the position shownin Figure 1.. Y

Figure 24 illustrates the cocked position of the parts and where the piston I'I is about to be released to strike against the bottom of the coupling I. This mechanism is as follows:

The mandrel 6 is enlarged and this enlargement terminates in an annular shoulder 2i. A sleeve 22 extends downwardly from the piston I l and surrounds the enlargement of the mandrel 5. The sleeve 22 is provided with a number of radial holes close to the bottom thereof and a plurality of balls 23 are positioned in these holes. The balls 23 engage the shoulder 2l in the cocked position of the tool and these balls are held or pressed inwardly by means of a latch ring 2%, which surrounds the sleeve 22 and tends to press these balls inwardly. A spring 25 bears against the top of the latch ring 24 and urges this ring downwardly to hold the balls 23 inwardly or latched. When the balls 23 are in the position shown in Figures l and 2, the piston l1 is latched to the mandrel S and cannot move relative to this mandrel. When the balls 23 move outwardly, as shown in Figurey 8, the piston I'i is free to move vertically on the mandrel 6, and strike against the bottom of the coupling I. The latch ring 2d is pressed upwardly when this ring engages the stop 2B, asV shown in Figure 8. In the f position of parts shown in Figure 8, the balls 23 can move outwardly away from the shoulder 2i and thereafter the piston I'I is forced upwardly by the springv I 9.

Operation In operation, the tool is lowered intoA the well on a string of drill pipe and the sub- 5 either threads into the lost object or a suitable shing tool is attached to this sub. When a solid attachment to the lost object is obtained, the drill pipe is pulled upwardly which moves the parts to the position shown in Figure. 2, that is, the. splines i disengage the boss 3. The barrel 2 may now rotate, if desired, while the mandrel 6 remains stationary. The upward pull previously described has caused the pins I6 to engage the shoulder 4i. This locks the ring I4 and the spring I3 may be further tensioned by threading the nut I downwardly on the mandrel S. The spring I3 now maintains a constant upward pull on the mandrel 6 and therefore on the lost obiect. The latch ring 24 is also just touching the stop shoulder 2@ and a slight further upward movement will push the latch ring 24. upwardly to the position shown in Figure 8, thus permitting the balls 23 to snap outwardly thereby releasing the piston ii and permitting this piston to be pushed upwardly against the bottom of the coupling I, by the spring I9. The piston II will also be forced upwardly by the hydro-static pressure which is exerted through the ports 25, which ope-n through the barrel i.y and permit uid to press upwardly against the bottom of the p-iston il.

To reset the toolf the barrel 2 is lowered to. the position shown in Figure l, the balls 23 then are pressed inwardly against the shoulder 2l thereby latching the piston Il to the mandrel G. Thereafter, the barrel 2 is again pulled upwardly to the position shown in Figure 2, and the operation is repeated. Y

Having described my invention, I claim:

l. A longitudinally striking oil well jar comprising a barrel, a threaded coupling .on the barrel serving as the anvil, a, mandrel extending into the barrel, said mandrel having a limited longitudinal movement in the barrel, coupling means on the mandrel attachable to a lost article in the well, a piston longitudinally slidable in the barrel. serving as the hammer, a spring in the barrel bearing against the piston and urging the same against the coupling, and latch means on the piston releasably engaging the mandrel, whereby the piston is releasably held with the spring ccmpressed and with the piston spaced from the coupling trip means engaging the latch means and disengaging the same on longitudinal movement of the barrel, and spring means bearing against the mandrel and urging said mandrel upward in the barrel, a ring slidably mounted in the barrel, said spring means resting on the ring, and means on the mandrel engageable with the ring to clamp said ring against the barrel whereby upward movement of the barrel will tension said spring means.

2. A longitudinally striking oil well jar comprising a barrel, a threaded coupling on the barrel. serving as the anvil, a mandrel extending into the barrel, said mandrel having a limited longitudinal movement in the barrel, coupling means on the mandrel attachable to a lost article in the well, a piston longitudinally slidable in the barrel serving as. the hammer, a spring in the barrel bearing against the piston and urging the same against the coupling, and latch means on the piston releasably engaging the mandrel, whereby the piston is releasably held with the spring compressed and with the piston spaced from the coupling, and trip means engaging said latch means on longitudinal movement of the mandrel to release said latch means and free the piston from said mandrel, and spring means bearing against the mandrel and urging said mandrel upward in the barrel, a ring slidably mounted in the barrel., said spring means resting on the ring,

f 'i= and means on the mandrel engageable with the ring to clamp said ring against the barrel whereby upward movement of the barrel will tension said spring means.

3. A longitudinally striking oil well jar comprising a barrel, a threaded coupling on the barrel serving as the anvil, a mandrel extending into the barrel, said mandrel having a limited longitudinal movement in the barrel, coupling means on the mandrel attachable to a lost article in the well, a piston longitudinally slidable in the barrel serving asthe hammer, a spring in the barrel bearing against the piston and urging the same against the coupling, and latch means on the piston releasably engaging the mandrel, whereby the piston is releasably hel-d with the spring compressed and with the piston spaced from the coupling, and trip means engaging said latch means on longitudinal movement of the mandrel to release said latch means and free the piston from said mandrel, and spring means bearing against the mandrel and urging said mandrel upward in the barrel, a ring slidably mounted in the barrel, said spring means resting on the ring, and means on the mandrel engageable with the ring to clamp said ring against the barrel whereby upward movement of the barrel will tension said spring means, a nut threaded on the mandrel, said spring means bearing against the nut, said nut being revolvable with the barrel to screw on the mandrel and tension said spring means.

4. A longitudinally strikingl oil well jar comprising a barrel, a coupling on the upper end of the barrel serving as the anvil, a mandrel esttending longitudinally in the barrel and having a limited longitudinal movement therein, a splined coupling connecting the mandrel and the barrel, a sub on the lower end of the mandrel providing coupling means to'a lost article in the well, a piston slidably mounted on the mandrel serving as the hammer, a spring bearing against the piston and urging the piston against the bottom of the coupling, the mandrel having an annular recess therein, a sleeve depending from the piston, balls mounted in the sleeve and releasably fitting into said'recess to couple the piston and the` limited longitudinal movement therein, a splined coupling connecting the mandrel and the barrel, a sub on the lower end of the mandrel providing coupling means to a lost article in the well, a piston slidably mountedon the mandrel serving as the hammer, a spring bearing against the piston and urging the piston against the bottom of Y the coupling, the mandrel having an annularA recess therein, a sleeve depending from the piston, balls mounted inthe sleeve and releasably tting into said recess to couple the piston and the mandrel, a latch ring engaging the balls and pressing the same into said recess, and means flxedly mounted in the barrel and engageable by the latch ring to release the balls and disengage said recess, a stop on the barrel engageable by the latch ring on longitudinal movement of the mandrel, whereby the balls are released from engagement with the shoulder.

6. A longitudinally striking oil well jar comprising a barrel, a coupling on the upper end of the barrel serving as the anvil, a mandrel extending longitudinally in the barrel and having a limited longitudinal movement therein, a splined coupling connecting the mandrel and the barrel,

a sub on the lower end of the mandrel providing coupling means to a lost article in the well, a piston slidably mounted on the mandrel serving as the hammer, a, spring bearing against the piston and urging the piston against the bottom of the coupling, the mandrel having an annular recess therein, a sleeve depending from the piston, balls mounted in the sleeve and releasably fitting into said recess to couple the piston and the mandrel, a latch ring engaging the balls and pressing the same into said recess, and means xedly mounted in the barrel'and engageable by the latch ring to release the balls and disengage said recess, a spring in the barrel bearing against said mandrel and urging said mandrel upwardly into the barrel.

7. A longitudinally striking oil well jar comprising a barrel, a coupling on the upper end of the barrel serving as the anvil, a mandrel extending longitudinally in the barrel and having a limited longitudinal movement therein, a splined coupling connecting the mandrel and the barrel,

` a sub on the lower end of the mandrel providing coupling means to a lost article in the well, a piston slidably mounted on the mandrel serving as the hammer, a spring bearing against the piston and urging the piston against the bottom of the coupling, the mandrel having an annular recess therein, asleeve depending from the piston, balls mounted in the sleeve and releasably fitting into said recess to couple the piston and the mandrel, a latch ring engaging the balls and pressing the same into said recess, and means xedly mounted in the barrel and engageable by the latch ring to release the balls and dsengage said recess, a

spring in the barrel bearing against said mandrel upwardly and urging said mandrel into the barrel, one end of said spring resting on a sliding ring in the barrel, and means pressing said ring against the barrel to prevent sliding thereof, said means being operable on longitudinal movement of the mandrel upwardly.

8. A longitudinally striking oil well jar comprising a barrel, a coupling on the upper end of the barrel serving as the anvil, a mandrel extendving longitudinally in the barrel and having a limited longitudinal movement therein, a splined coupling connecting the mandrel and the barrel, a sub on the lower end of the mandrel providing coupling means to a lest article in the well, a piston slidably mounted on the mandrel, a spring bearing against the piston and urging the piston against the bottom of the coupling, the mandrel having an annular recess therein, a sleeve depending from the piston, balls mounted in the couple the piston and the mandrel, a latch ring engaging the balls and pressing the same into the recess, and means iixedly mounted in the barrel and engageable by the latch ring to release the balls and disengage said recess, said barrel having uid intake ports therein below said piston, whereby hydrostatic fluid pressure is exerted on the piston.

9. A longitudinally striking oil well lar comprising a barrel, a coupling on the upper end of the barrel serving as the anvil, a mandrel extending longitudinally in the barrel and having a limited longitudinal movement therein, a splined coupling connecting the mandrel and the barrel, a sub on the lower end of the mandrel providing coupling means to a lost article in the well, a piston slidably mounted on the mandrel, a spring bearing against the piston and urging the piston against the bottom of the coupling, the mandrel having an annular recessl therein, a sleeve depending from the piston, balls mounted in the sleeve and releasably fitting into said recess to couple the piston and the mandrel, a latch ring engaging the balls and pressing the same into the recess, and means flxedly mounted in the barrel and engageable by the latch ring to release the balls and disengage said recess, a second spring in the barrel bearing against said mandrel and urging said mandrel upwardly into the barrel, one end of said second spring resting on a sliding ring in the barrel, and means pressing said ring against the barrel to prevent sliding thereof, said means being operable on longitudinal movement of the mandrel, said barrel having uid intake ports therein below said piston, whereby hydrostatic uid pressure is exerted on the piston.

CLIFFORD M. HOWARD.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENT Number Name Date 1,717,972 Hartson June 18, 1929 1,801,673 Knox c Apr. 21, 1931 2,008,765 McCullough July 23, 1935 2,122,751 Phipps July 5, 1938 2,144,869 Y Boulter Jan. 24, 1939 2,166,299 Kennedy et al July 18, 1939 2,425,012 Snyder Aug. 5, 1947 2,544,473 Y Smith Mar. 6, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1717972 *May 9, 1928Jun 18, 1929Hartson Earl SOil-well-tool jar
US1801673 *Mar 19, 1930Apr 21, 1931Knox Granville SRotary drilling jar
US2008765 *Dec 7, 1931Jul 23, 1935James A KammerdinerJar
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2898084 *Dec 16, 1954Aug 4, 1959Jersey Prod Res CoSeismic shock source
US3203482 *May 4, 1961Aug 31, 1965Ray Lyles CecilJarring devices
US3834472 *Mar 16, 1973Sep 10, 1974Perkins LJarring accelerator
US4333542 *Jan 31, 1980Jun 8, 1982Taylor William TDownhole fishing jar mechanism
US4511007 *Aug 10, 1983Apr 16, 1985Norton Christensen, Inc.Locking device for a tool with telescopically displaceable parts
US5330018 *May 6, 1993Jul 19, 1994Jerry GriffithAuto set bi-directional jar
US6338387 *Nov 10, 1999Jan 15, 2002Downhole Research, LlcDownward energized motion jars
US7111678 *Oct 30, 2003Sep 26, 2006Impact Selector, Inc.Field adjustable impact jar
US7281575 *Jul 17, 2006Oct 16, 2007Mcelroy FayField adjustable impact jar
Classifications
U.S. Classification175/296, 175/299, 175/304
International ClassificationE21B31/00, E21B31/113
Cooperative ClassificationE21B31/113
European ClassificationE21B31/113