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Publication numberUS2634402 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 7, 1953
Filing dateFeb 2, 1948
Priority dateFeb 2, 1948
Publication numberUS 2634402 A, US 2634402A, US-A-2634402, US2634402 A, US2634402A
InventorsVanderzee Harry Herbert, Robert A Mccallum
Original AssigneeAmi Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Phonograph selector system
US 2634402 A
Images(7)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 7, 1953 .H. H. VANDERZEE ETAL 2,634,402

PHONOGRAPH SELECTOR SYSTEM Filed Feb. 2, 1948 '7 Sheets-Sheet l April 7, 1953 H. H. VANDERZEE ETAL 2,534,402

I PHONOGRAPH SELECTOR SYSTEM Filed Feb. 2, 1948 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS b h, KWVOIEZEE April 7, 1953 H. H. VANDERZEE ETAL 2,634,402

PHONOGRAPH SELECTOR SYSTEM I Filed Feb. 2, 1948 7 Sheets-Sheet s 4 INVENTORS.

' Mil. Van/0522s; W A. 0. 01 emu/M April 1953 H. H. VANDERZEE ETAL 2,634,402

PHONOGRAPH SELECTOR SYSTEM 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Feb. 2. 1948 A ll 7 v 4 H 3; Z m Ma. #m a M B v/ 8 m 6 H April 7, 1953 H. H. VANDERZEE ETAL 2,634,402

PHONOGRAPH SELECTOR SYSTEM Filed Feb. 2, 1948 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTORS. H. h; l mvoszzss BY A, a, (4440M MXW April 1953 H. H. VANDERZEE ETAL 2,634,402

PHONOGRAPH SELECTOR SYSTEM Filed Feb. 2, 194a 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 IL I a m s Q g @g Q Q okumqmw (om udkob '7 Sheets-Sheet 7 H. H. VANDERZEE ETAL PHONOGRAPH SELECTOR SYSTEM April 7, 1953 Filed Feb. 2, 1948 I I I II II I t L Patented Apr. 7, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE PHONOGRAPH SELECTOR SYSTEM Harry Herbert Vanderzee, Grand Rapids, Mich., and Robert A. McCallum, Clarendon Hills, 111., assignors, by mesne assignments, to A M I Incorporated, a corporation of Delaware Application February 2, 1948, Serial No. 5,854

. 7 Claims. 1

The present invention relates to record selection mechanisms for automatic coin controlled phonographs, and particularly to a remote con? trol selection system whereby the record selection for an automatic phonograph may be made from any one of a number of stations remote from the machine, to permit the use of multiple wall boxes, each including a coin control and a manually operable selector.

It is the general aim of the present invention to provide simpler, more reliable, and less expensive remote control devices than those heretofore used, so designed that although they permit quick selection of any desired record from a large list of titles, yet they do not require the multiple conductor cables commonly employed in-prior remote control selector circuits, and do not involve the difficulties of manufacture and service that have rendered previously known devices objectionable.

In introduction, it may be explained that in a typical automatic phonograph installation it is advantageous to install quite a number of wall boxes, each including a record title selector and coin control, so that the phonograph may be played from various locations, as from the several difierent booths of a restaurant. It follows that to be ideal for the intended purpose it is not only necessary that the control system be satisfactory in operation, but it is equally important that the wall box units be inexpensive enough so that the initial cost of installation is not prohibitive. In this connection it must also be kept in mind that the system includes not only the phonograph-and the wall boxes, but in addition requires electrical wiring to illumihate the boxes and to actuate the selector mechanism.

Many wall boxes previously known have requlred, in addition to their lighting circuits, a separate conductor extending from the box to the phonograph, for each selection that is to be made. Now, if a large list of selections is presented (as the forty selections listed in the present machine), it will be seen that a forty-conductor cable will be required to effect the selections, to say nothing of the. additional conductors necessarily provided for a return circuit, credit circuit for the coin control device, and lamp circuit to illuminate the list of titles. Such an arrangement is not only expensive but is difficult to-install, connect and service; and large cables, while-not easilyconcealed, are unsightly if left exposed to view.

This problem has long been recognized in the art, and many and various attempts have been made to develop a satisfactory solution. It appears, however, that the various other qualities necessary for satisfactory-performance have been seemingly irreconcilable, and that in developing a system capable of reducing the number of conductors required, prior designers have invariably introduced new complications into the systems which have been almost equally disadvantageous, and consequently have largely defeated the objects of their invention. Typical examples of such efiorts are systems wherein the lighting and selector circuits are combined and the selection transmitted by-coded pulses, or where the control is done without wires by radio. In the first of these, the pulsing devices introduce mechanical complications; and in addition the circuits appear to require full-wave rectifiers and filters to provide a direct current power supply. This additional equipment, when made large enough to supply the lamp circuits as well as effect the selection, is not only expensive, but makes the system unjustifiably wasteful of electric power. The radio controls are even more costly, since they are necessarily of quite intricate design and require much expensive equipment.

Thus although the problem to which the present invention relates has plagued workers in the art for many years, it has been heretofore with out an entirely satisfactory solution.

It is accordingly the primary object of the present invention to overcome the known shortcomings of prior control systems, and to provide a novel and improved system wherein the various factors are so reconciled that the system, while permitting selection from a large list of titles, does not require a large number of conductors; yet eiiects a, selection quickly, dependably, with simple and inexpensive mechanical and electrical components, and with minimum consumption, 01 energy.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a wall box control device having an. improved and simplified working mechanism characterized by the absence of thelarge number of electrical contacts ordinarily employed,- so that service difiiculties are decreased and losses. of revenue due to periods of inoperation are materially reduced.

The foregoing objects are accomplished inthe present invention by the provision of. a, remote control systemwherein a. multiplicity of.v selection titles are displayed. in. a number of. wall boxes located at-various points remote f'romthephonos graph; with a manually shiftable device at each box to effect a selection of any of the titles desired, and electrical circuits to transmit this information to the phonograph and play the desired record. The circuit here employed requires, in addition to the pair of leads to the lamps of the wall box, only one wire for the selector circuit.

The remote control mechanism employs a multiple contact selector switch in the phonograph, with a single switch arm and a contact corresponding to each selection, so that multiple leads may be extended from the switch to the corresponding magnets of a mechanical record selector. The switch is automatically rotated by a synchronous driving motor controlled by a set of homing contacts, so that it has a normal position of rest, but when actuated will automatically advance a full revolution to progressively scan each of its contacts in rapid succession. Since the movement of the switch is governed by a synchronous motor, it will scan the contacts at a fixed and determinable rate of speed, and if the switch arm is momentarily energized during the scanning it will actuate the selector magnet corresponding to the contact on which it rests at the instant of energization. A selection of any desired record may then be made by transmitting a time interval signal to the switch, to energize its scanning arm at the precise instant it rests .on a given desired contact. By the present invention, this interval signal is generated in the wall box, by an interval timer that is controlled by the title selector mechanism and set to measure a different time interval for each of the several possible selections. Means are provided to start the interval timer and begin rotation of the .selector switch at the exact same instant, so that variations in the duration of the signal will re- ,sult in energizing the switch at corresponding contacts. In short, the mechanism provides means in the wall box for translating a selection of any one of a multiplicity of titles into a time interval signal of different duration, together with instrumentalities in the phonograph to translate this time interval signal back into a record selection corresponding to the title selection made at the wall box.

A preferred commercial embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the drawings of this disclosure, wherein:

Figure 1 is a front elevational view of a wall .box remote control unit constructed in accordance with the teachings of this disclosure;

Figure 2 is a transverse sectional view taken substantially on the plane of the line 22 of Figure 1;

.Figure 3 is an enlarged fragmental sectional view taken substantially on the plane of the line 3-3 of Figure l;

Figure 4 is a transverse sectional view taken substantially on the plane of the line 44 of Figurel, and looking in the opposite direction from which Figure 3 is shown;

Figure 5 is an enlarged sectional view of the interval timing mechanism, and is taken substantially on the plane of the line 5-5 of Fig- -ure 3; r a

Figure 6 is a detail sectional view of the homing contacts of the interval timer and is taken substantially on the plane of the line B--6 of Figure5;

Figure 7 is a detail sectional view of the interrupter contacts of the interval timer, and is taken substantially on the plane'of the line 1.!

of Figure 5;

Figure 8 is a detail plan sectional view taken on the plane of the line 8-8 of Figure 6;

Figure 9 is a central sectional view of the power operated selector switch and homing contacts of the receiving unit;

Figure 10 is a detail sectional view of the homing contacts of the selector switch, and is taken substantially on the plane of the line Ill-40 of Figure 9;

Figure 11 is a detail sectional view of the selector contacts of the power operated switch of the receiving unit, taken substantially on the plane of the line H-Il of Figure 9;

Figure 12 is a detail sectional view of the manually operable push-button contacts by which the operation of the selection system is initiated at the wall box, the figure being taken on the'plane of the line l2--l2 of Figure 2;

Figure 13 is a detail fragmental elevational view of the links of the title holder chain; and

Figure 14 is a schematic wiring diagram 0 the selector system.

The remote control unit is conveniently made in the form of a small metal box or case Hi having one or more coin chutes H and a window I2 in which a number of record title cards I 3 are displayed. As shown, this window has an indicated indexing point l4 and is provided with a pair of manually operable selector knobs (5 to move the various title cards I 3 up and down across the window, so that any desired title may be indexed by the mark 14. The selection is then made by manually depressing the pushbutton I6.

The wall box includes a back plate I? which is ordinarily secured to some fixed supporting surface, so that the box and its internalmechanism are immovable unless detached from the back supporting structure in the conventional manner. The internal mechanism of the wall box'is carried by a pair of mounting brackets 2|, each secured to the back plate by cap screws 22 and slotted at 23 to support the Slug rejector 24 below the coin chute II. A coin box 25 is also provided, but since these parts may be conventional they will not be described in greater detail. The left-hand mounting bracket 2! carries a contact block 26 supporting a pair of contacts CS, arranged to be momentarily closed whenever a coin falls from the slug rejector 24 to the coin switch lever 21. The bracket 2| also carries a contact mounting plate 2 8 on which a pair of spring contacts PB are mounted. These contacts are positioned immediately behind the push-button [6, so that the contacts will close in response to manual actuation of the button.

The title holder of the box, the subject matter 7 of my divisional application 56,493, now Patent No. 2,519,299 issued August 15, 1950, is in the form of an endless chain 3|, the upper end of which passes over and is carried on a pair of sprockets 32 fixed at the opposite ends of ahorizontal shaft 33. The chain loop hangs down from the sprockets 32 with its front span immediately inside the glass window pane l2 and its back span alongside the slug rejector 24 and coin box 25 of the unit. The shaft 33 is journaled in a pair of side plates 34, which are in turn supportedbetween the brackets 2| by spacers 35, secured to the brackets 2| by screws 36. The sprockets 32 each includes a hub in the form of an outwardly projecting gear 31. These-gears 31 overhang the brackets 2i and are each m mesh with one of a pair of fiber gears .38- car; ried on the inner ends of thestub shafiisiflfof the-selectorknohs l5. Thechain; 3;! consists of azmultiplicity of identical links, each having aflat channel portion 4! with side flanges 42 along its upper and lower. edges, sothat a title card 43 carrying'the. name of oneof-I the record selections may beslid into position. from. the right-hand end ofthe channel. (Figure 1),. A stop portion, 44 is;struckfrom the backpf the panel (Figure l) at: a point nearits:left.-hand edge to limit the inward movement of the title. cards and to locate a. selectionnumber 45, which may be in the form of=a plastic card also slid into;the.channel. and held in placeby a small tab..

The opposite ends of the individual channels are. bent back'toform link. portions 41' and are pierced so that the several links may bev joined by pins 48; to form a. continuous. chain, These pins. are preferably-headed, as indicated at 49, and; small tabsil are struck from the metal of the. links to overlie the head of each pin and prevent the chainrrom becoming disassembled. The link: portions 41 of each channel are not exactlyparallel with each other, but diverge slightly from the upper" ends toward. the lower cars 52; so that the lower ears of each link may overlie; the upper portions of the adjoining link without binding. The lower loop of the chain passes, around a lower pair of sprockets 6| mountedon a floatingaxle. shaft 32-, which extends: through a pair ofbayonet: slots 63 in; the side plates 34..

It. is; to benoted that the cardreceiving sur face of the individual channels; is not parallel with the length of the chain, but is at an acute angle, thereto, so that the lowermost edge of each of the channels behind the window l2 overhangs. the uppermost edge of the channel immediately below it. This arrangement defines asubstantial gap. 53 between adjacent channels, and'permits light to pass through the chain from a light source behind it, but since the back surface of each channel is brightly polished, the back. surfaces of each act as a mirror to reflect this lightback downwardlyto the face-of the title selection cards-.. Thus all of the cards behind the-window may be brilliantly illuminated, yet displayed without glare and without a visible source of illumination.

Illumination for the title cards is provided by. aplurality of small incandescent lamps 54 mounted in. suitable sockets between a reflector 5.5 and a translucent diffusing sheet 56, which. is secured to the. opposite ends of the reflector andpositioned. in a plane immediately behind the forward span ofthe chain, and sincethere are several lamps positioned at different pointsalong the forward span of the chain it will be seen that their combined effect will be to produce substantially uniform lighting of the clifiusing plate, from, which. the light is directed to the polishedback surfaces of each channel; and back downon the title cards;

From the foregoing, itwill be apparent that any desired selection on the phonograph may be. made by manually manipulating one of the knobs l5, which will act through the shaft 39 and pinion 38 to rotate the gears 31. and sprockets 32.-

and move-the chain 3! to bring thedesired title.

card adjacent the indexingmarker M. A stepby-step motion is accomplished by a detent including a notched wheel 51 on the inner face of one of the sprockets 32 and adetent roller. 533 on a spring urged lever or rocker arm. 59.. This detent-facilitates; accurate alignment of the title cards with. the marker. I 4 and prevents thechairr from'coming to rest; in. a position;betweenitwovormovement of the title: cards to; setthe signal generating mechanism. to; a. different. interval. of time, corresponding to. each; o1. the several. titles onthe chain. 31-. Thisli's accomplished. by a. time ing mechanism: includin the: push-button. ac,- tuating contacts; BB; and an; interval timerr' in.- cludinga synchronous motor adaptedto, rotate at a fixed rate. of speedand driving: a contactor mechanism set according to; theposition of 'the selector chain 3l,,so that. the: length: of thezinrterval signal transmitted will be. of. different duration. for each ofthe; multiple title cards.

The mechanism; includes a switch shaft: 65. having one end journaledj in, one Off the side plates 34 and the other endjournaled ina: boss 66' carried on a bracket 61 secured: between the inner surfaces of the; two side Plates 3.4.v The shaft 65 carries av forty-one tooth. ratchet; wheel 68 adapted to be. rotated bythespring finger-69 of a synchronous: stepping, magnet. S'(l)- As. shown, this magnet includes an adjustable. armature 12 on which the: spring finger is: mounted, so that motion of the armature causesv the finger to engage the ratchet. wheel 68 and. ad vance it one tooth whenever the coil of the magnet is energized. A spring 'l-3returns the. armae ture to its normal position. after: each. step, and aleaf spring 14. mounted on. the bracket 6]. acts as. a detent on the ratchetwheel 68 to prevent over-travel or return movement. The shaft 65 carries two sets of switch arms. A set of'homing contacts are mounted on; aninsulating: plate 15. near the other end of; the shaft 65, as best shown in Figures-5 to 8. The plate 15 is spaced. away from the plate 34 by screw and collar mounting parts 16. The plate'li carries aninternal commutator ring 11 which is at all times engaged by a rotating contact. 18- on. the, short arm of a contact spring 19. This spring is. carried in. an insulating mounton the shaft 65, and has a longer arm carrying a. contact 8| arranged toengage an outer contact. ring 82.. Thering 82 is notched at 83 and a contact: 84 is" located in the notch, The. contact: ring 83. and. contacts BI and 84 may be designated as; homingcontacts, since they; functionto. maintain: a hold.- ing circuit to cause the; stepper SH) to continue-to rotate theswitch: until the. contact 81 comes to rest on,84. The contactring. 82'isi also: provided with a notch 85, along its: inner. edge and. an insulated point 86 in thenotch to break the circuit to the signal generator at. the home position. This notch and point are at alesser radius than notch 83 and. contact 84, and consequently are, not engaged bythe contact but; are utilized as a part of the time interval signal generator;

The time signal generatorincludes a circuit interrupter capable of being set to generate a time, signal of different duration, corresponding to each ofthe diiferent title cards listed on the chain. 31.. To this end the shaft 65 carriesa second spring swltch arm 88 also insulated. from the shaft and. insulated from. the.- arms but having two blades fixed in opposite directions to bridge the space between the homing contacts and the interrupter contacts. The shorter arm of the spring 88 carries a contact 81 adapted to ride over the inner edge of the ring contact 82 and across the notch 85 and point 86, while the longer blade is bent in the opposite direction and carries a contact 89 to engage the surface plate 93 of an interrupter gear 9I. The interrupter gear 9| is mounted on'the shaft 65 and engages a pinion 92 carried by the chain sprocket shaft 33. The gear 9| includes a flat contact plate 93 extending around its entire surface, except for a small insulating button 94. The plate 93 is engaged at all times by the opposite ends of an edged contact spring 95 carried on one of the spacers 35, but is insulated from the spacer by a sleeve 96. The gear 9| is free to rotate on the shaft 65, however, so that its angular position on the shaft is governed' solely by 'the gear 92. Thus whenever the sprockets 32 are rotated to move the chain, the gear 9| is correspondingly rotated, and an insulating button is shifted to a different angular position. Since there are forty-one links in the chain the interrupter is geared to move one forty-first part of a revolution for every link on the chain. It will thus be apparent that one position of the insulating button 94 of the interrupter gear will correspond to the home position of the contact 89, and that every other position' will be angularly spaced away from the home position a different distance.

The receiving unit of the selector mechanism is housed in the phonograph cabinet. In brief, the receiving unit comprises a power operated scanning switch having forty-one contacts. The scanning switch is driven by a synchronous motor and includes self-energized homing contacts, so that when the switch is actuated its movable contactor progressively advances over all of its multiple contacts in rapid succession. The rate of advance is at a fixed rate of speed, however, and since each of the multiple contacts of the switch is connected to a different magnet winding of the mechanical record selector, it follows that by interrupting the movement of the switch arm at a predetermined time interval after it begins to move it may be caused to stop on any desired contact. If the switch arm is then energized any desired one of the selector magnets may be actuated. The switch of the receiving unit is illustrated in Figures 9, 10 and 11 where it will be seen that it includes a mounting plate IOI on which a bracket I02 is secured, so that rotary switch shaft I03 may be journaled between bearings in the plate |I and in a boss I04 on the bracket. The bracket I02 also carries a synchronous stepping motor S(2) identical to the stepper previously described, and having an armature I06 to actuate a spring finger I07 en gaging a toothed ratchet wheel I08 on the shaft Thus, each time the stepper magnet 3(2) is energized the spring finger I01 advances the ratchet wheel a distance of one tooth. There are forty-one teeth on the ratchet wheel, corresponding to the forty-one contacts of the selector switch. A spring leaf detent I09 prevents overtravel of the ratchet as well as preventing return movement.

The shaft I03 carries two sets of switching contacts. The first of these is a set of homing contacts arranged so that after'the stepping motor 8(2) is energized from an external source and begins its movement, its own contacts will close a holding'circuit and cause it to continue "to advance a full revolution and again stop at its home position. The homing contacts are mounted on an insulating sheet III, spaced away from the plate MI by a pair of mounting posts .I I2. The contacts include a central commutator ring II3 which is'at all times engaged by a Contact II4 on a spring arm HE. A contact II6 on the opposite end of the spring arm rides around an outer ring I H, which has a notch I I8 in the path' of movement of the contact H6, and an insulat= ing point II9 located in the notch. The spring switch arm is on an insulating mounting on the shaft I03. The contacts of the selector switch are mounted on an insulated sheet I2 I, supported from the plate IOI by a number of spacers I22. The sheet I2I carries a commutator I23, surrounding the shaft I03, so that a contact I24 on the spring switch arm I25 will be in constant engagement with the commutator ring. The spring arm I25, like the spring I I5 of the homing contacts, is carried in an insulating mounting on the shaft I03. A contact I26 on the opposite end of the switch arm I25 rides around the circle of the selector contacts I2'I so that as the shaft I03 is rotated the switch arm passes over all of the contacts in rapid succession. There are forty-one of these contacts disposed about the center of the switch. Forty of the contacts are connected to the multiple magnet windings of the record selector mechanism. The remaining contact I28 is idle, and acts merely as an insulating point for purposes of convenience in the circuit.

The operation of the selector system is best explained with reference to Figure 14 which comprises a schematic wiring diagram of the wall box and the receiving unit in the phonograph, referred to in describing the various steps through which the circuit passes as the selection is made.

In Figure 14, the receiving unit is shown as connected to three separate remote control units, eachindicated by one of the broken line boxes. In this connection it will be remembered that a typical automatic phonograph installation contemplates the control of the phonograph from several remote stations, and the three stations illustrated are merely by way of example, since the system will function in exactly the same manner with more or fewer stations. In fact, the only apparent limitation on the number of stations is the capacity of the power source-used to ener gize the illuminating lamps in the various boxes.

The power source is preferably a step-down transformer T, having its primary windings adapted to be energized by any ordinary -120 A. 0. line circuit and having a secondary winding delivering about twenty-four volts, which is transmitted through the line conductors L(I) and L( 3) to each of the wall boxes to energize the illuminating lamps. Conveniently, these lamps may include four 6-volt lamps 54, in series. Each of the wall box circuits includes a credit circuit relay CC and a pair of oppositely disposed oxide rectifiers R( I) and R(2), in addition to the synchronous stepping motor S(I), the coin switch CS(I), detent switch D( I and push-button PB, previously described in connection with the structure of the box.

The sequence of operations in making a selection is that a coin is first dropped into the chute to establish a credit circuit and the selector control knobs are then moved to bring'the title card of the desired selection to the index point 9 |4.- The push-button l6 is then depressed to make the selection. The credit circuit relay has two pair o'fcontacts 00(l) and 00(2), each of which are closed only when the winding of the relay is energized. This relay winding CC and the coin switch as are in series between the line LG) and 11(3) so that whenever the coin switch contacts CSare momentarily closed by the passageof a coin,the relay pulls in, closing a holding circuit through the contacts '00 (-2) I and 'H(l) to hold the relay energized after the coin switch contacts 0S reopen. The homing contacts H( I) represent the union between homing contact 8 3 (Figure 6) to the switch rotor parts 11, 19, 89 and 8|. The circuit is now in a condition where the path of first current fiow is through 08 and the winding 00, and the holding circuit current continues to fiow through 00(2) and thec'ontacts H(|). this connection it is also to be noted, however, that although no current flows through the push-button contacts PB yet the credit-circuit for the unit has been set up by the closing of the relay contacts 00(1) to connect the push-button to the line L(3) through the rectifier HQ) and detent switch D( i) The desired record title is 'now moved to a position in front of the indexing marker Hi. This movement of the chain 3| acts through the pinion 92 to set the angular position of the interrupter gear 9.! and its insulating button t l at any one of forty-one different positions. As the chain is moved, however, the detent switch D(i) opens between each selection so that actuation of the push-button is inefiective unless the title is properly aligned with the index marker. The push button contacts PB are then closed to choose the selection.

Closing of the contacts PB permits unidirectional flow of current from the line L(3) through D(;|) and rectifier R(2) .and thence through 00(I) and PB to the windingsof arelay 0B in the receiving circuit, from whichit flows through the homing contacts I-I(4). The contactsI-Ifll) represent the union between the homing contacts 9 (Figure 10) and the contact H6, arm H5, contact H4 and commutator H3 of the power operated switch, previously described. The relay CR includes three pairs of normally open contacts 0R(l), 0R.(2) and 0R(4), as well as two pairs of normally closed contacts CR(3) and CR()'. Thus, when the winding is energized, contacts CRO) close to complete a circuit from line LU) through 'the'homing contacts H01) to winding CR, and thence through the rectifier R(3) and relay contacts 0R0) to line L(3-). This circuit permits unidirectional current flow through the winding in the opposite direction to the current it received from the push-buttons, but holds the relay. in for the following half cycle. The closing of the contacts CRU) also closes the circuit from'line L(l) through stepper SU) and rectifiers RH) and R(3), and sinc'e'these rectifiers are polarized in the same direction, they' permit a unidirectional flow of current through the windings "8(1). The windings arethus energized by a pulsating direct current of sixty cycles per second, which will cause the switch ratchet wheel and shaft to-begin a stepping movement'of sixty notches per second. The closing of contacts 0R( I) also completes a circuit from-the line L(I) through the rectifier R(5) and thence through the windings of the synchronous stepping.unit S(2) in thereceiving unit. This is also a "half-wave currentpso the-stepper will beginto stepaaroundin-rexact synchronismwith the movetakes on a sufiioient charge to cause a timedelay of about a twentieth of a second after the opening of its contacts before the relay fallsout. The closing of'relay 0R also closes the contactsCRGl) of the record selector circuit. These contacts areconnected to count the number of operations of the phonograph, and the counter will be en'er gized at-this point of the circuit operation-by the The contacts CRtZ) of the relay set up a holding circuit toholdthe closing of contacts TD(I).

relay energized after the homing contacts H) are opened by rotation of the stepper S(-2 From the above it will be seen that the relay OR. is originally closed by a circuit completed from line L(3) through D(l), R(2), 00(l) *and:

PB, and thence through H( 4) to line -L( I This energizes both steppers SH) and S(.2) through the same contacts 0R.( l) and these provide'means to start the steppers SH) and {5(2) at thesame' precise instant. In addition, the arrangement is. effective to complete the circuit in that portion-of:

the cycle of the current source in which the current is tending to flow from line L(3) tolineLfl l, but since the rectifiers RH) and R(5) prevent flow in this direction the steppers will not be actually energized until the next half cycle. This is of importance since it means that the step- .pers will each become energized at the beginning.

of a half -wave cycle of theenergizing current, *so that a positive start is assured.

The step of the operation just described .hav-;

ing energized both of the synchronousstepping motors SH) and 8(2) will advance the homing contacts of each of these motors, and the selector switch arm I26 will move to the idle-contact l-28.

At this time the homing contacts HM) open to break the circuit through the credit circuit relay 00, which falls out and opens the contacts -00(I) through which the push-button is energized, and the holding contacts 00(2). The .circuit is closed through the homing contacts HQ) and H(3),.

however, and through the interrupter contacts I to complete a circuit from line M3) to line L(2). The homing contacts Hui) of the receiving unit have opened at this time, but the homing contacts H(5) have simultaneously closed; so that a circuit is completed from line L(2) through the relay winding CR, and thence through the contacts CR(2) and H(5) to hold therelay enerhoming contacts H(2) to the line 14(3),, while the circuit through the stepper S(2) is completed through'the rectifier R65) and through the relay contacts 0R(I) as before. The-time delay relay 15 again energized through the rectifiers'RKB).

The steppers SH) and 8(2) thus continue '.to

operate synchronously, in accordance with the alterations of the supply current,'until the r0-' tating switch arm 88 strikes the insulatingbutr :ton 94 on the disc 93. This opens the interrupter contacts I and breaks the circuit previously established from the line L(3) through the homin contacts H(2) and H 3 and to the windings of the relay CR, so that although a circuit through the windings CE is still completed through the rectifier R(3) during half of the alternating current'cycle, it is opened during the other half, allowing the relay CR to fall out. Actuation of this relay opens the contacts CRO), CR(2) and CRUD, and closes CR(3) and CR(5). The opening of contacts CR) breaks the circuit through the winding of the synchronous stepping motor 8(2) so that the motor stops, with the switch arm I26 resting on one of the contacts I21, corresponding to the position of the interrupter button 94. The time delay relay TD remains in for a fraction of a second, however, so that a circuit is completed through the contacts TD(I) and CR(5) to energize the record selector magnet. This causes the mechanical record selector to play the record desired, and the selection operation is completed.

.The circuits prepare themselves for the next operation by advancing both steppers to their original home position so that they will be in position to initiate another operation. The hom ing operation of the wall box stepper is so arranged that the circuit through SH), RH), and H(2) is not broken. The result is that the wall box switch does not stop at any point, but continues in its step by step motion until the homing contacts H(2) break. This occurs simultaneously of the opening of the contacts I-I(3) and the closing of the contacts HH), so that the circuit is again in the original condition.

In the receiving unit, the fact that the time delay relay TD held the contacts TD(2) open for a moment after the opening of the contacts CR( 1) causes the stepper S(2) to stop for a fraction of a second. However, as soon as the time delay relay TD falls out and the contacts TD( 2) close, a homing circuit is completed from the line L( I) through contacts H 5 CR(3) TD(2) and thence through the windings S(2) and the rectifier RM) so that a unidirectional pulsing current is fed through the motor to step it to home position where the contacts H(5) break and cause it to stop. The breaking of 11(5) occurs simultaneously with the closing of contacts H(4) so that the receiving circuit is again in its original position and ready to function again,

' From the foregoing description, it will be apparent that by following the teachings of this invention it is entirely practicable to provide an automatic phonograph control system including any'desired-number of coin controlled wall boxes, Y each having its own selector mechanism, so that that the'operation of one remote control box does not in any way interfere with the like operation of'the'other boxes. By this is meant that while each include its own time interval signal gencrating mechanism, initiated by the'closing of a relay at'th'e phonograph, yet the circuits are so designed that only the signal mechanism of the box whose push-button is depressed is actuated.

It is important to note that the system requires only one conductor to the Wall boxes in addition to their lighting circuits, so that only three conductors are required to complete the illuminating circuit and credit (coin control) circuit as well as the record selection circuit.

Further, these important advantages are ace complished by an arrangement which does not; introduce other objectionable features into the' machine, particularly since it does not require.

the large number of switch points at the wall boxes, nor utilize pulsing contacts or complicated mechanical devices characterizing many of the prior art controls. The circuits are notably economical in their power requirements, since the power requirements for the selection operating itself is negligible, and the lamp circuits are so related that these use a simple alternating current source, rather than being energized through a rectifier as the design of some prior devices hasrequired.

It will thus be apparent to those acquainted in the art that the mechanism here disclosed marks a valuable forward step in the development of control systems of this type, andfor the first time makes possible the installation of systems having:

a large number of remote control wall boxes which combine the desirable features heretofore apparently irreconcilable, and yet are inexpensive to manufacture, economical in their power requirements, dependable in their operation and adapted to be connected to the phonograph unit by a simple three-wire conductor.

The form of the invention illustrated in the drawings of this disclosure and described herein.

is a present preferred form, as now commercially manufactured. It is to be recognized, however, that various departures from the exact structure shown may be made without sacrificing all of the advantages of these teachings, and it is accord ingly pointed out that the scope of the inventive concept is not limited to thi precise construetion, but extends equally to any variations or modifications coming within the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim as new and desire to protect by United States Letters Patent is:

1. In a remote control selector system, the com- 1 bination, with an automatic phonograph having a mechanical record selector and a receiving unit in the phono raph, and a remote control unit with a manually operable title selector; of means including a synchronous motor in the remote control unit to generate a time interval signal of different duration for each title, and means including a power operated scanning switch in' the receiving unit responsive to the time interval signal to select one of a multiplicity of records in,

accordance with the duration of the signal.

2. In a remote control phonograph record selector system, the combination, with a remote control station having a time interval signal generator and a receiving station having a mechanical record selector, of a scanning switch having mote control station, and means for energizing the shiftable contact of the scanning switch in: response to the termination of the time interval, signal to close a circuit through one of the fixed contacts; together with means including manually operable push-button'contacts at the remote control station to initiate operation of the scam 13 ning switch and time interval signal generator at the same instant.

3. In a remote control phonograph record selector system, the combination, with a remote control station having a time interval signal generator and a receiving station having a mechanical record selector, of a scanning switch having a fixed contact for each record selection and a shiftable contact adapted to engage all of the fixed contacts in rapid succession; power operated means to drive said scanning switch including homing devices to cause it to have a normal position of rest; means for initiating the movement of said switch in response to the beginning of a time interval signal from the remote control station, and means for energizing the shiftabl contact of the scanning switch in response to the termination of the time interval signal to close a circuit through one of the fixed contacts; together with means to initiate operation of the scanning switch and time interval signal generator at the same instant.

4. In a remote control phonograph record selector system, the combination, with a remote control station and a receiving station having a mechanical record selector, of a manually operable record title selector at the remote control station and a time interval signal generator responsive to the manipulation of the record title selector and driven by a synchronous motor to generate a time interval signal of different duration for each selection; and a receiving unit including a scanning switch having a fixed contact for each record selection and a shiftable contact adapted to engage all of the fixed contacts in rapid succession; power operated means comprising a synchronous motor to drive said scanning switch including homing devices to cause it to have a normal position of rest; means for initiating the movement of said switch in response to the beginning of a time interval signal from the remote control station and means for energizing the shiftable contact of the scanning switch in response to the termination of the time interval signal to close a circuit through one of the fixed contacts; together with means comprising manually operable contacts at the remote control station to initiate operation of the scanning switch and time interval signal generator at the same instant.

5. In a remote control phonograph record selector system, the combination, with a remote control station and a receiving station having a mechanical record selector, of a manually operable record title selector at the remote control station and a time interval signal generator responsive to the manipulation of the record title selector to generate a time interval signal of different duration for each selection; and a receiving unit including a scanning switch having a fixed contact for each record selection and a shiftable contact adapted to engage all of the fixed contacts in rapid succession; power operated means to drive said scanning switch including homing devices to cause it to have a normal position of rest; means for initiating the movement of said switch in response to the beginning of a time interval signal from the remote control station and means for energizing the shiftable contact of the scanning switch in response to the termination of the time interval signal to close a circuit through one of the fixed contacts; together with means comprising manually operable contacts at the remote control station to initiate operation of the scanning switch and time interval signal generator at the same instant.

6. In a remote control selection system, the combination, with a mechanical record selector having multiple selection magnets, of a control system including a multiple contact selector switch adapted to energize said record magnets; means to progressively advance the switch through all of its positions to scan all of the switch contacts, together with a manually operable title selector at a control station remote from the phonograph; an interval timer in the remote control station, means responsive to the operation of the title selector to set the adjustment of the interval timer to a different interval for each title, and means to transmit a signal from the interval timer through the selector switch to energize a contact of the selector switch corresponding to the duration of the time interval signal and thus energize a selection magnet of the mechanical record selector to select the record corresponding to the title selected at the remote control station.

7. In a remote control phonograph record selector mechanism, the combination, with an automatic phonograph having a mechanical record selector and at least one remote control station, of a multiple contact rotary selector switch for a mechanical record selector of the phonograph and means located in the phonograph to progressively advance the selector switch across its contacts at a fixed rate; a timer including a synchronous motor at the remote control station, with means for electrically connecting the timer with the advancing means of the switch causing the switch to advance; a manually shiftable title selector at the remote control station, with means responsive to the actuation of the manually shiftable title selector to set the timer at a difierent predetermined interval corresponding to each of the several selections, whereby difierent time interval settings of the timer will advance the selector switch to different contacts to effect the selection of a record corresponding to the title selected at the remote control unit.

H. HERBERT VANDERZEE. ROBERT A. MCCALLUM.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 302,723 Strimes July 29, 1884 875,660 Haig Dec. 31, 1907 983,438 Gruskin Feb. 7, 1911 1,525,431 Phillips Feb. 3, 1925 1,639,987 Coupland Aug. 23, 1927 2,136,630 Massonneau Nov. 15, 1938 2,167,061 Andres July 25, 1939 2,222,218 Wallace Nov. 19, 1940 2,233,026 Mock Feb. 25, 1941 2,296,760 Barry Sept. 22, 1942 2,319,788 Bryan 'et a1. May 25, 1943 2,324,908 Collison July 20, 1943 2,327,429 Hull Aug. 24, 1943 2,346,238 Schmidt Apr. 11, 1944

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US2804307 *Nov 16, 1953Aug 27, 1957Rock Ola Mfg CorpPhonographs
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Classifications
U.S. Classification340/4.4, 369/53.45, 369/34.1
International ClassificationG07F17/30, G11B17/22
Cooperative ClassificationG07F17/305, G11B17/22
European ClassificationG11B17/22, G07F17/30B